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Full text of "Town of Cohasset (Mass.) Annual Report"

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ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
of the FINANCIAL AFFAIRS 

of the 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

Reports of the School Committee 

and the 
Reports of Other Town Officers 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 2005 



TOWN OF COHASSET 

Incorporated 1770 

Population January 2005 — 7550 

President of the United States of America 
George W. Bush 

Massachusetts Senators 

Edward M. Kennedy 

John F. Kerry 

Tenth Congressional District 
Representative William D. Delahunt 

Norfolk and Plymouth Senatorial District 
Senator Robert L. Hedlund 

Third Plymouth Representational District 
Representative Garrett Bradley 

Annual Town Meeting 
Date Set by Board of Selectmen 

Election of Officers 
Within 35 days of the Annual Town Meeting 



IN MEMORIAM 

John Francis O'Toole - January 10, 2005 
Planning Board 

Peter G. Whitman - January 16, 2005 
Government Island Study Committee 

Luther Emmett Holt III - February 3, 2005 
Advisory Committee 

Dr. Robert T. Sceery - February 18, 2005 
School Physician 
Board of Health 

William H. McArthur - March 1, 2005 

School Custodian 

Call Firefighter 

Special Police Officer 

Tree & Park Department 

Health Insurance Advisory Committee 

Herbert L. Jason - July 14, 2005 
Deputy Harbormaster 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr. - July 29, 2005 

Highway Surveyor 

Measurer of Wood and Bark 

Noel A. Ripley - July 31, 2005 

Historical Commission 

Veterans Agent 

Government Island Study Committee 

Keeper of the Town Clock 

Clifford Dickson - November 13, 2005 

Assistant Harbormaster 

Shellfish Constable 

Cohasset Yacht Club 

Call Firefighter 



IN MEMORIAM 
Continued 



Betty P. Enders - November 23, 2005 

Secretary Cohasset High School 

Historical Society 

Council on Elder Affairs 

Charles C. Ford - December 2, 2005 
Senior Shuttle 

Charles A. Marks - December 24, 2005 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Postmaster 



ELECTED OFFICIALS - TOWN OF COHASSET 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN - 3 YEAR TERM TERM EXPIRES 

Michael H. Sullivan 2006 

Ralph Dormitzer 2007 

Robert Spofford 2007 

Frederick Koed 2008 

Raimund G. Vanderweil, Jr. 2008 

MODERATOR - 3 YEAR TERM 

Daniel S. Evans 2008 

TOWN CLERK - 3 YEAR TERM 

Marion L. Douglas 2008 

ASSESSOR - 3 YEAR TERM 

Michael C. Pairolia 2006 

Elsa Miller 2007 

Mary E. Granville 2008 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 YEAR TERM 

Richard F. Flynn 2006 

Pamela Wilson 2006 

Adrienne MacCanhy 2007 

Jamie Williams 2007 

Alfred Slanetz 2008 

TRUSTEES PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY - 3 YEAR TERM 

Agnes McCann 2006 

Patience G. Towle 2006 

Carol Riley 2006 

Sarah R. Pease 2007 

Barbara Power 2007 

Stacey V. Weaver 2007 

Sheila Evans 2008 

Roger L. Lowe 2008 

Rodney M. Hobson 2008 



BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 YEAR TERM 

Margaret S. Chapman 2006 

Stephen N. Bobo 2007 

Robin M. Lawrence 2008 

COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 YEAR TERM 

John Muncey 2006 

Ralph Perroncello 2007 
Helen C. Nothnagle (appointed by Governor) 

Ann Barrett 2009 

Christopher M. Allen 2010 

PLANNING BOARD - 5 YEAR TERM 

Peter J. Pratt 2006 

Alfred S. Moore 2007 

Robert H. Sturdy 2008 

Michael R. Westcott 2009 

Stuart W. I vimey 2010 

RECREATION COMMISSION - 5 YEAR TERM 

Lisa L. Lojacono 2006 

Lillian Murray Curley 2007 

Mary K. Muncey 2007 

James Richardson 2007 

Richard Barrow 2008 

Anthony J. Carbone 2009 

James E. Carroll, Jr. 2010 

SEWER COMMISSIONERS - 3 YEAR TERM 

John W. Beck 2006 

Sean Cunning 2007 

Raymond Kasperowicz 2008 

WATER COMMISSIONERS - 3 YEAR TERM 

John McNabb 2006 

Nathaniel Palmer 2007 

Glenn A. Pratt 2008 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE (3 YRS) 

NO MEMBER MAY SERVE MORE THAN TWO CONSECUTIVE FULL TERMS. 
APPOINTED BY TROIKA. 

Vivien A. Bobo, 292 Jerusalem Rd. 2006 

Roger Q. Hill. 1 9A Highland Ave. 2006 

Donna McGee, 27 Hill Street 2006 

Merle S. Brown, 546 Beechwood Street 2007 

Thomas J. Glavin, 107 Nichols Road 2007 

Patrick Waters, 91 Aaron River Road 2007 

Bemadette Faulkner, 19 Heather Drive 2008 

Jamie Oilman, 62 Rust Way 2008 

Samuel Wakeman, 255 Atlantic Ave. 2008 

ADA COORDINATOR 

Robert M. Egan, 17 Bradley Woods Drive, Hingham 2008 

ADMSORY BOARD ON COUNTY EXPENDITURES 

ALTERNATE RIGHT TO KNOW MUNICIPAL COORDINATOR FOR BOARD 
OF HEALTH 

APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN 

Joseph Godzik - Health Agent 

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY COMMITTEE 

Michael Bliss, 76 Summer Street 2006 

Rodney Hobson, 3 1 Deep Run 2006 

Joseph Jerz, 133 North Main Street 2006 

Robert Kinscherf, 172 Sohier Street 2006 

Luciano Laurehi. 422 Jerusalem Road 2006 

James Shipsky, 58 Doane Street 2006 

Alfred E. Slanetz, 14 Nichols Road 2006 

Mary White, 22 Sheldon Road 2006 

Andrew Willard, 37 Stockbridge Street 2006 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Paul Murphy, 12 Elizabeth Lane, Hingham 2008 

ASSESSOR/ APPRAISER 

Mary E. Quill, 24 Gumey Drive, Pembroke 2006 

BEECHWOOD BALL PARK COMMITTEE 

Merle Brown, 546 Beechwood Street 2008 

Lillian Curley, 28A Margin Street 2008 

Lynne DeGiacomo, 59 Beach Street 2008 

Adrienne MacCarthy, 85 Doane Street 2008 

Roseanne McMorris, 89 Doane Street 2008 

Glenn Pratt, 482 King Street 2008 

Francis Sargent, 1 Doane Street 2008 

Fredric Siegel, 4 Bates Lane 2008 

Nancy Snowdale, 52 Mill Lane 2008 

BUILDING INSPECTOR/ZONING OFFICER 3 YEAR TERM 

Robert M. Egan, 17 Bradley Woods Drive, Hingham 2008 

BY-LAW COMMITTEE, PERMANENT (3 YEAR TERM) 

Jacqueline Dormitzer, 334 South Main Street 

Louis F. Eaton, 30 Beach Street 

Agnes McCann, 104 Doane Street 

Marion L. Douglas, CLERK (ex-officio) 

Paul R. DeRensis, ESQ. - TOWN COUNSEL (ex-officio) 

CALL FIREFIGHTER COMM. 

Bruce W. Pratt, 83 Sohier Street 

Robert D. Silvia, 50 Stockbridge Street 

Ian R. Fitzpatrick, 60 Pleasant Street 

Richard Bonanno, 109 Hallett Street, Scituate, MA 

CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE (3 YEAR TERM) 

Samuel C. Pease, 3 Sanky Road 2006 

Mark Baker, 32 Nichols Road 2007 

David Bergers, 14 Bayberry Lane 2007 

Steve Gaumer, 100 Pond Street 2008 



CEMETERY COMMITTEE 

Joseph M. Curley, 9 Church Street 
James H. Gilman, 62 Rust Way 
Julianna D. Hassan, 497 Beechwood Street 
Joseph L. Jerz. 133 North Main Street 
Glenn A. Pratt, 182 King Street 

CIVILIAN DISPATCH COMMITTEE 

James Hussey - Police Chief 
Roger W. Lincoln - Fire Chief 
William Griffin - Town Manager 

COHASSET COMMON HISTORIC DLSTRICT COMMISSION 

Sarah H. Gomez, (District Resident) 2007 

Patience G. Towle 2007 

Thomas F. Van Aarle, (Architect) 2007 

Gail Parks (District Resident) 2006 

Mary Jane Larson (District Resident) 2006 

Janice Crowley (Realtor) 2006 

William A. Hurley (District Resident) 2005 

Peter J. Wood 2005 

COHASSET CULTURAL COLTVCIL 

NO MEMBER MAY SERVE MORE THAN TWO CONSECUTIVE FULL TERMS 
(PER MGLS) 

D. Alex Adkins. 33 Black Rock Road 2006 

Betts H. Murray, 8 Westgate Lane 2006 

Selene Carlo-Eymer, 3 1 Bow Street 2006 

Douglas Eymer, 31 Bow Street 2006 

Davrd T. Lehr, 70 Red Gate Lane 2007 

Suzanne S. Terry. 32 Margin Street 2008 

Elizabeth Morse, 24 Cedar Street 2008 

Joan Jensen, 63 Howes Road 2008 

Mary A. Foley, 184 Lamberts Lane 2008 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 

Lance Norris 2006 

Four (4) Vacancies 



COMMITTEE to SURVEY STRUCTURE and FUNCTIONS of TOWN GOVERNMENT 

Paul A. Donovan 
William Lean, Jr. 
Seven (7) Vacancies 

COMMUNITY PRESERVATION COMMITTEE 

Al Moore, Planning Board 

James G. Dedes, Conservation Committee 

Deborah Cook, Open Space Committee 

Ralph Dormitzer, Selectmen 

Helen Nothnagle, Senior Housing 

Margy Charles, 85 Linden Drive 2008 

Stuart Ivemey, Resident, 7 Sanky Road 2008 

Jeff Wahl, Resident, 36 Old Pasture Road 2008 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 3 YEAR TERM 

Edward Graham, 715B Jerusalem Road 2007 

Veneta Roebuck, 312 Beech wood Street 2007 

Sarah E. Charron, 40 Cedar Acres Lane 2007 

David H. Farrag, 23 Hull Street 2007 

Alix White, 25 James Lane 2007 

Ross Smith, 19 Whitney Woods Lane, Assoc, member 2007 

Deborah S. Cook, 28 1 King Street 2008 

Richard M. Karoff, 19 Border Street 2008 

CONSTABLE (3 YEARS) 

Maria Plante, 798 Jerusalem Road 2006 

D.P.W. SUPERINTENDENT 

Carl A. Sestito 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

Appointed by TROIKA 

Robert C. Hunter, 604 Jerusalem Road 
Robert A. Stansell, 23 Cedar Lane 
Josiah Stevenson, 173 Hull Street 
Robert Egan, Building Inspector 



10 



DIRECTOR OF FINANCEATOWN ACCOUNTANT 

J. Michael Buckley, Jr. 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 

Peter L. Brown, 38 Atlantic Ave. 2006 

Gabriel E. Gomez, 59 Highland Ave. 2006 

Charles E. Hurd, 18 Jerusalem Road Drive 2006 

Timothy J. O'Brien, 8 Talarico Lane 2006 

Thomas A. Powers, 25 Powers Lane 2006 

Peter Richardsson, 498 North Main Street 2006 

ELDER .AFFAIRS, COUNCIL ON 

Anna A. Abbruzzese. 155 Border Street 2007 

Nancy Barrett. 60 Elm Street 2007 

Susan S. Galligan, 3 1 Border Street 2007 

James F. Kearney, 52 Brewster Road 2007 

Edward T. Mulvey, 50 Pond Street 2007 

Dolores A. Roy, 53 Old Coach Road 2007 

Jean J. Thompson. 3 1 Reservoir Road 2007 

Barbara Elliot, 179 Atlantic Ave. 2008 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT, DEPUTY DIRECTOR 

Glenn A. Pratt, 482 King Street 

FENCE VIEWERS 

Kearin A. Dunn, 1 86 Pond Street 2008 

Glenn A. Pratt, 482 King Street 2008 

FIRE CHIEF 

Roger W. Lincoln 

FIRE DEPARTMENT UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

David R. Asci Firefighter/EMT-P 

Randy Belanger Firefighter/EMT-P 

Paul T. Bilodleau Firefighter/EMT-B 

James F. Curley Firefighter/EMT-B 

John J. Dockray Firefighter/EMT-P 

Thomas P. Finegan Acting Lieutenant/EMT-B 



11 



James E. Fiori 
James Lee Gurry 
John M. Heman 
Sharon S. Leone 
Frances X. Mahoney, Jr. 
Matthew B. Man- 
Laura C. Morrison 
Robert F. Protulis 
Randall W. Rosano 
James P. Runey 
Robert D. Silvia 
Daniel N. Smith 
Peter W. Starvaggi 
Mark H. Trask 
Eric Wenzlow 
James E. Hall 



Acting Lieutenant 

Captain/EMT-B 

Firefighter/EMT-P 

Firefighter/EMT-P 

Firefighter/EMT-B 

Acting Lieutenant/EMT-B 

Firefighter/EMT-P 

Firefighter/EMT-B 

Acting Lieutenant/EMT-B 

Captain 

Captain/EMT-B 

Firefighter/EMT-P 

Firefighter/EMT-P 

Captain 

Firefighter/EMT-B 

Firefighter/EMT-P 



CALL FIREFIGHTERS 



William Brooke 
John MacNeill 
Jordan MacNeill 
Steven Maynard 
Kathleen McGuire 
Thomas McKay 
Joseph Migliaccio 
Bruce Pratt 



Lieutenant 
Lieutenant 



Lieutenant 



FOREST WARDEN 



Roger W. Lincoln 



GOVERNMENT ISLAND ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Constance M. Afshar, 141 South Main Street 
Noel A. Ripley, 179 South Main Street 
Hamilton T. Tewksbury, 81 Elm Street 
Richard P. Barrow. 283 Kins Street 



2006 
2006 
2007 
2007 



GROWTH and DEVELOPMENT TASK FORCE 



Clark H. Brewer, 262 North Main Street 
Richard W. Swanborg. Jr., 48 Nichols Road 
Michael R. Westcott, 2 River Road 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 



12 



HARBOR COMMITTEE 

Scott Herzog, 37 Church Street 2005 

Mary Muncey, 377 South Main Street 2008 

John F. Bertolami, 69 Summer Street 2006 

Lorren S. Gibbons, 1 1 Schofield Road 2006 

Gail Parks. 19 Highland Ave. 2006 

Peter J. Wood, 77 Summer Street 2007 

Peter H. Pearce, 23 Forest Ave 2007 

HARBOR HEALTH COMMITTEE 

Russ Bonetti, 20 Parker Ave. 2006 

Noel Collins, 15 Forest Ave. 2006 

James W. Drysdale, 4 Cedar Acres Lane 2006 

Christopher Evans, 36 Sohier Street 2006 

Paul Figueirdo, 173 Pond Street 2006 

Willy Fox, 35 Stockbridge Street 2006 

Paul Pattison. 104 Elm sVeet 2006 

Karen Quigley, 27 Clay Spring Road 2006 

Peter Wood, 77 Summer Street 2006 

Peter Workman, 43 Beechwood Street 2006 

HARBOR MASTER 

John D. Muncey, 377 South Main Street (Acting Harbor Master) 

ASSISTANT HARBOR MASTER 

Clifford J. Dickson. 1 8 Tupelo Road 2006 

William Kelly. 227 Old Oaken Bucket Road. Scituate 2006 

Robert D. Baggs, 485 Halherly Road, Scituate 2006 

Lorren S. Gibbons, 1 1 Schofield Road 2006 

Robert A. Johnson, 68 Highland Crossing, Scituate 2006 

Christy J. Tarantino, 61 Mann Lot Road, Scituate 2006 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Rebecca Bates-McArthur, 417 Beechwood Street, Chair 2006 

Noel A. Ripley, 179 South Main Street 2007 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury, 81 Elm Street 2007 

Marilyn M. Morrison, 505 Beechwood Street 2007 

Nathaniel Palmer. 9 Little Harbor Road 2007 

David Wadsworth, 24 Joy Place. Secretary 2007 



13 



KEEPER of the LOCKUP 

Conte, John C, 1 Forest Ave. 2006 

KEEPER of the TOWN CLOCK 

Noel A. Ripley, 179 South Main Street 2006 

MBTA REPRESENTATIVE 

Mark D. Brennan, 2 Mendel Road 2008 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

Frederick R. Koed, 92 Pleasant Street 2008 

PLUMBING and GAS INSPECTOR 

William Higgins 2006 

POLICE CHIEF 

James M. Hussey, 22 Fortune Drive, Norwood 2008 

SERGEANTS OF POLICE UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

David C. Cogill 
John C. Conte 
Shellee L. Peters 
William P. Quigley 
Gregory J. Lennon 

PATROLMEN UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Lawrence D. Ainslie 
Edward P. Bagley 
Frederick H. Grassie 
Garrett A. Hunt 
Patrick Kenney 
Lisa M. Matos 
James P. McLean 
John H. Small 
Christy J. Tarantino 
Jeffrey R. Treanor 
Paul M. Wilson 
Francis P. Yannuzzi, Jr. 
Christopher Goodmen 



14 



RECREATION DIRECTOR 

John M. Worley, 123 Outlook Drive, Marshfield 2008 

RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

F. Allan MacDonald, 41 Oak Street N/A 

John K. McNabb, Jr., 53 Pond Street N/A 

Sharyn K. Studley, 1 17 Hull Street N/A 

Jean White, 190 Jerusalem Road N/A 

REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 

Marion L. Douglas, Town Clerk 

Margaret R. Charles, 85 Linden Drive 2006 

Judith Volungis, 234 Forest Ave. 2007 

Edythe Ford, 135 Beach Street 2005 

SCHOOL BUDGET INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE 

Richard Avery, 22 Surry Drive 2006 

Joseph R. Barresi, 60 Brewster Road 2006 

Gabriel Gomez, 59 Highland Ave. 2006 

Maureen Jerz, 133 North Main Street 2006 

Margaret Lynch, 430 South Main Street 2006 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

9 MEMBERS APPOINTED FOR. THREE (3) YEAR TERM. THE MODERATOR, 
SELECTMEN AND SCHOOL COMMITTEE WILL EACH APPOINT THREE (3) 
MEMBERS. 

Adrienne MacCarthy, 85 Doane Street (appointed by Moderator) 
Donna O'Donnell, 248 King Street (appointed by Moderator) 
Kathleen E. Guinee, 1 1 Surry Drive (appointed by Moderator) 
Scott Collins, 164 Sohier Street (appointed by School Comm.) 
Joanne Chittick, 98 South Main Street (appointed by School Comm.) 
Mary Beth Masci, 106 Doane Street (appointed by School Comm.) 
Patricia C. Chase, 25 Red Gate Lane (appointed by Selectmen) 
David Chase, 100 Pond Street, #28 (appointed by Selectmen) 
Denise Parker, 16 Rustic Drive (appointed by Selectmen) 
Thomas M. Daley, 1 1 Ledgewood Farm Drive (appointed by Selectment) 



15 



SEALER of WEIGHTS and MEASURES 

Robert M. Egan, 17 Bradley Woods Drive, Hingham 2006 

SENIOR HOUSING COMMITTEE 

Nancy Barrett, 60 Elm Street 2005 

Margaret Charles, 85 Linden Drive 2008 

Roseanne M. McMorris, 89 Doane Street 2005 

Edward T. Mulvey, 50 Pond Street 2006 

Joseph R. Nedrow, 21 Fairoaks Lane N/A 

Wayne Sawchuk, 432 Beechwood Street N/A 

Freda A. Zotos, 28 Old Coach Road 2006 

SHELLFISH DEPUTY 

Dickson, Clifford, 19 Tupelo Road (Constable) 2006 

Muncey, John D.. 377 South Main Street (Constable) 2006 

Laugelle, Rocco F.. 38 Smith Place 2006 

Baggs, Robert D.. 485 Hatherly Road, Scituate, MA 2005 

SOUTH SHORE RECYCLING COOPERATIVE COMMITTEE 

Lehr, Arthur L., Jr. 2008 

SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL SCHOOL DISRICT COMMITTEE 

David M. Kneeland, 60 Doane Street 2008 

TOW^ ARCHIVIST 

David H. Wadsworth 2006 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Paul R. DeRensis 



16 



TOWN HISTORY COMMITTEE 

Ernest Grassey, 20 Ledge Way 2005 

Molly Pierson, 123 Atlantic Ave. 2005 

Wigmore Pierson, 123 Atlantic Ave. 2005 

Harold E. Coughlin, 25 Reservoir Road 2006 

Louis R. Eaton, Jr., 30 Beach Street 2006 

Julia H. Gleason, 44 Stockbridge Street 2006 

James W. Hamilton. 298 King Street 2006 

Louis S. Harvey, 465 King Street 2006 

Margot Cheel, 14 Margin Court 2007 

Jacqueline M. Dormitzer, 334 South Main Street 2007 

Ann Pompeo, 130 Forest Ave. 2007 

TOWN PLANNER 

Elizabeth B. Harrington, 185 Essex Street, Quincy 2008 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Linda Litchfield 

TURKEY HILL MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 

Veneta P. Roebuck, 312 Beechwood Street 

VETERAN SERVICES - DIRECTOR OF 

Mary Jeanette Murray, 28 Margin Street 2006 

VILLAGE REVITALIZATION TASK FORCE 

Joseph Coggins, 57 Elm Street 

Lucia Flibotte, 27 Summer Street 

Timothy O'Brien, 8 Talarico Lane 

Josiah Stevenson, 173 Hull Street 

Richard Swanborg, 48 Nichols Road 

Rebecca B. Mc Arthur, 417 Beechwood Street, (Historical Comm.) 

Noel Ripley, 179 South Main Street, (Historical Comm.) 

Merle Brown, (Selectmen) 

Elizabeth Harrington, (Town Planner) 



17 



WASTEWATER COMMITTEE 

Merle S. Brown, 546 Beechwood Street (Board of Selectmen) 2006 

John C. Cavanaro, 29 Arrow wood Street 2006 

Paul Davis, 38 Rocky Lane 2006 

James G. Dedes, 207 South Main Street 2006 

Joseph R. Godzik, 24 Maple Street, Scituate (Board of Health) 2006 

Jeffrey F. Moy, 33 Ledge wood Drive 2006 

Raymond Kasperowicz, 172 South Main Street 2006 

Stephen N. Bobo. 292 Jerusalem Road (Board of Health) 2006 

Vicky C. Neaves, 259 South Main Street 2006 

WEIR RIVER ESTUARY PARK COMMITTEE 

Vincent P. Dunn, 715 Jerusalem Road 
Richard J. Avery, 22 Surry Drive 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Benjamin H. Lacy, 181 Jerusalem Road 2006 

Barbara M. Power, 74 Beach Street 2007 

Charles Higginson, 159 Atlantic Ave. 2007 

S. Woodworth Chittick, 98 South Main Street 2008 

Peter L. Goedecke, 100 Nichols Road 2008 

Kathleen Hunter, 86 Summer Street 2008 



18 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



The following elections and town meetings were held: 

Annual Town Meeting, April 2, 2005 
Annual Town Election, April 9, 2005 
Special Town Election, May 21, 2005 
Special Town Meeting. December 5, 2005 

The Annual Listing of Persons seventeen years of age and older as per General Laws, 
Chapter 51, Section 4 was conducted by mail during January. Any citizen of the United 
States who is a Massachusetts resident and who will be 18 years old on or before a town 
meeting or Election Day may register to vote. There is no waiting period to be eligible to 
register to vote, if you move, you may register to vote as soon as you move into your new 
home. Registration is closed for a brief period before town meeting and election to allow 
election officials time to prepare the voting lists. If you register during a "closed" period, 
you will be eligible to vote only in later town meetings or elections. You must be 
registered twenty days before all primaries and elections, and ten days before a special 
town meeting. Currently there are a total of 5220 voters. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Margaret Charles. Chairwoman 
Marion Douglas, Clerk 
Edythe Ford 
Judith P. Volungis 



19 



Selectman's Report for FY2006 Annual Town Report 



January- New Town Manager Bill Griffin starts full time the end of January. Selectmen 
thank Finance Director Michael Buckley for filling in as acting Town Manager. 
Selectmen look at alternatives to fence along Cohasset Harbor to maintain the character 
of the harbor, while constrained by state building codes. A sub-committee of the 
Selectmen meets with state officials in Boston to discuss the Town's compliance with the 
second amended judgment on Little Harbor. 

February- the Selectmen and the Town debate the issues surrounding the sewering of 
Little Harbor and providing septic wastewater disposal for 95 units of housing at the 
Cook Estate. Three term Selectman Ronnie McMorris decides not to seek re-election. 

March- Selectmen hold a Downtown Revitalization project public hearing to discuss 
options for sidewalk covering that will come under budget so that the project can move 
forward. Selectmen sign LIP agreement application for affordable apartments portion of 
Cedamere development. 

April- Town Meeting approves a S3 1.9 million dollar budget, subject to approval of a 
$400,000 override. Town meeting also approves the Little Harbor/ Atlantic Ave. sewer 
extension. Town Manager Bill Griffin appoints Jim Hussey Police Chief after negotiating 
a new contract. Fred Koed is re-elected Selectman and the board welcomes new 
Selectman Gary Vanderweil. The Board is re-organized; Fred Koed is elected Chairman 
and Ralph Dormitzer Vice Chairman. Cook Estate I project developer Northland 
Residential informs selectmen scope of project is reduced from 95 to 65 units. Town 
Counsel rules that the reduction is substantial and is considered a significant enough 
change under State Procurement Laws Chapter 30B to require re-bidding. 

May- Selectmen begin to reformulate Second REP for going out to bid for Cook Estate. 
Cohasset Police are called to Cohasset High School after the discovery of a bullet and a 
threatening note. Town wide override of $400,000 and debt exclusion override of Si 3.2 
million for Little Harbor/ Atlantic Sewer project fails. Sewers will now be funded 100% 
by homeowners in Little Harbor/ Atlantic Ave. district. 

June- New RFP Draft is debated and approved by Selectmen. 

July- Spindrift Lane neighborhood asks selectmen to post "No Parking" signs along their 
lane. Selectmen ask Police Chief and DPW Chief for recommendations. DiNero's 
Restaurant applies for a second time for a KENO license. After a public hearing 
Selectmen vote for a second time to recommend to the Lottery Commission that the 
license be denied. 



20 



August- Ongoing issues around the construction of Greenbush Line of the Old Colony 
Railroad continue. Selectmen listen to Parker Avenue neighborhood complaints about 
speeding on Parker Avenue. New Cedamere owners inform Selectmen that no 
apartments will be included in Cedamere. Hurricane Katrina strikes Louisiana. 

September- Selectmen open bids for Cook Estate II. Deer Hill Associates is first, based 
on the selection criteria results of the five selectmen. Cohasset Associates threatens to sue 
Town over selection. Selectmen approve Cohasset Animal Control Officer Paul Murphy 
heading to Louisiana to help in the Hurricane Katrina effort with animal control. State 
Treasurer Timothy Cahill presents Town of Cohasset with first $19.6 million dollar check 
from the School Building Assistance (SB A) Fund. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
Fred Koed, thanks Treasurer Cahill, State Senator Bob Hedlund, State Representative 
Garret Bradley and Finance Director Michael Buckley for all of the work and assistance 
lend to the town of Cohasset in getting the SB A enacted. 

October- Town Manager Bill Griffin appoints Former State Representative and Cohasset 
Selectman Mary Jeanette Murray as the new Town Veteran's Agent to fill a vacancy 
created by the death of Noel Ripley. 

November- Town Counsel informs the Selectmen that an extension of the outside closing 
date for Cook Estate II of January 15, 2006, will violate Chapter 30B of the State 
Procurement Law. Deer Hill Partners informs the selectmen that there is insufficient time 
to obtain all permits to close on the Cook Estate project. Selectmen award bid to 
Cohasset Associates. Cohasset Associates, after consideration, declines accepting the 
Cook Estate designation as developer. 

December- Selectmen Ralph Dormitzer and Gary Vanderweil negotiate a new extension 
with the Cook Trustees. Special Town Meeting (STM) approves the use of 9 acres of 
town owned land adjacent to the Cook Estate for open space. Budget is finally balanced 
at STM after override failed in spring. Budget season for FY2007 begins. School 
Superintendent Denise Walsh proposes $1.6 million dollar school budget increase. Town 
Manager Bill Griffin proposes to Selectmen to alter the process of Town Meeting and 
overrides with a new balance budget approach. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick R. Koed 
Chairman 



21 



2005 ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN MANAGER 

It is an honor and privilege to submit to the citizens of Cohasset my first annual report as 
your Town Manager. I commenced my service as Town Manager on January 31, 2005. I 
thank the Board of Selectmen for the confidence they showed in me when they appointed 
me to this position, and for the support they have given me during my short tenure. 

Cohasset was facing several important issues and challenges as we began the year 2005. 
The municipal and school budgets were under great stress due to limited new revenues, 
growing fixed costs, and the need to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of town 
services. That challenge was made even more difficult when the Proposition 2 V2 
override question failed at a special election in May of this past year. Town and school 
officials worked together to fairly allocate the budget reductions that were necessary to 
respond to the override defeat. After many years of discussion, debate and negotiations 
with the Department of Environmental Affairs, the 2005 annual town meeting authorized 
SI 3. 2 million in bonds to finance sewer service expansion for the Little Harbor/ Atlantic 
Avenue and the Deep Run/Rust Way areas. Unfortunately, 2005 did not see finalization 
of the Cook Estate senior multi-family housing project. However, efforts are currently 
underway to see that project to a successful conclusion in 2006. 

In addition to above, there were several special projects that I focused on during 2005, 
included the preparation of financial management policies and guidelines to guide future 
decision-making and improve the town's fiscal health now and into the future. Those 
policies were adopted by the Board of Selectmen and Advisory Committee, and address 
such issues as fiscal reserves, financial planning and monitoring, capital planning, debt 
management, revenue enhancements and investments. Also relating to town finances, I 
convened a "Fiscal Summit" in October of this year to allow members of the Board of 
Selectmen, School Committee, Advisory Committee, department heads and members of 
the public to discuss the upcoming budget process, fiscal policies and fiscal priorities. 

To improve the decision-making process leading up to town meetings, I suggested an 
article and budget review schedule that would allow us to distribute warrant booklets to 
town residents that are more informative, easy to read and comprehensive. I believe that 
worked well for the December 2005 special town meeting and will hopefully be effective 
in 2006 and beyond. 

In closing, I wish to thank town officials, employees and members of the public for the 
welcome you have given me in my first year as Town Manager. Cohasset is a wonderful 
town, and while we face many challenges in the future, we have the capacity and energy 
to succeed. I would especially like to thank the many volunteers who serve on boards, 
commissions, and committees for your thousands of hours of service to the community, 
and to our town employees who day in and day out are serving the people of this 
community. 

William R. Griffin 
Town Manager 



22 



ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF TOWN COUNSEL 

2005 

This year was a very active and successful year for the Law Department: 

1 . Advice & Legal Documents . Numerous advisory opinions were rendered 
throughout the year to various Town officials and Boards relating to a wide variety of 
issues and subjects. Frequent and ongoing attention was given to reviewing and/or 
drafting Bylaws, numerous contract documents and agreements. Town Manager 
transition issues, easements, procurement documents, public road documents. Warrants 
for Town meetings (both special and annual town meetings), compliance with State 
Ethics Act, public records requests, various Town rules and regulations, proposed 
legislation of benefit to the Town and other legal documents. 

2. Administrative Agencv Proceedings . The Town was involved with a 
number of state or federal administrative agencies, including issues before the Appellate 
Tax Board, Department of Environmental Protection, Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Commission, Army Corps of Engineers and the Norfolk County District Attorney. 

3. Projects . We assisted with issues related to the Community Preservation 
Act, various private road issues. North Cohasset Sewer project issues, the Avalon and 
Cedarmere projects. Central Cohasset Sewer Project issues, licensing issues, the MBTA 
Greenbush line, 40B Comprehensive Permit issues, James Lane issues, and the Jacobs 
Meadow tidal flood gates project. 

4. Labor Issues . We assisted the Town in general employee matters and in 
connection with employee grievances, labor arbitrations and retirement issues. We also 
provided advice from time to time during the year regarding the interpretation and 
application of collective bargaining agreements and the processing of grievances. In 
addition, several non-union personnel issues, including possible disciplinary proceedings, 
occurred during this year. We assisted with several collective bargaining agreements. 

5. Litigation . As of December 3 1 , 2005, the number of claims and lawsuits 
in which the Town is a party total 32 as follows: 



Matters involving the Board of Selectmen/Town Manager: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. Town of Cohasset , 
Suffolk Sup Ct, No. 38652 

De Wolfe v. Town of Cohasset , MCAD Docket No. 04- 
MCAD Docket Number: 04BEM00967, 
EEOC/HUD Number: 16CA401392. 



23 



2 Matter involving the Conservation Commission 

Herzfelder v. Cohasset Conservation Commission et al ., 
Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 02-1 166. 
Tehranian v. Cohasset ConCom , Nor. Sup. Ct., C.A. 
No. 05-241. 

1 Matter involving the Harbormaster 

Cohasset Harbor Marina, Inc. v. Town of Cohasset 
and Cohasset Harbormaster . Nor. Sup. Ct. C.A. No. 
1999-1575. 

13 Matters involving the Board of Appeals: 

Chief Justice Cushing Highway Corporation v. Board of Appeals , 

Land Ct, No. 243862. 

Emanuello v. Board of Appeals , Norfolk Sup. Ct., C.A. 99-00905 

Morrissey v. Board of Appeals , Land Court No. 263788. 

Cohasset Cove LLC v. Board of Appeals , Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. No. 00- 

803. 
Aver V. Board of Appeals et als ., Norfolk Sup Ct C.A. No. 03-00209 and 

C.A. No. 03-02255 (which consists of Ayer's appeal of her request 

for zoning enforcement, which was denied, entitled Ayer v. Board 

of Appeals , Norfolk Superior Court) 
Daly et al. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court, Misc. No. 292733 
Petrillo v. Board of Appeals et als. ; Land Court Misc. No. 287659. 
Petrillo v. Board of Appeals et al .. Norfolk Sup Ct C. A. No. 03-01224 . 
Cohasset Water Commission v. Board of Appeals and Avalon , Mass. 
Land Court No. 294252. 

Strecker v. Board of Appeals , Norfolk Sup Ct C.A. No. 04-04537. 
Ledgewood Estates, Inc. v. Board of Appeals and Chief Justice 
Cushing Highway Corporation , Mass. Land Court No. 302403 see also 

243862. 
Shelton and Fitzpatrick v. Board of Appeals , Nor. Sup. Ct. C.A. No. 02- 

352. 
Avalon Cohasset v. Board of Appeals , Housing Appeals Committee No. 

2005-09. 

2 Matters involving the Planning Board: 

Campbell v. Planning Board et al ., Norfolk Sup Ct C.A. No. 04-1391 
Kupperstein v. Planning Board et al ., Norfolk Sup Ct C.A. No. 04-1304 



24 



Matters involving the Sewer Commission: 

King Taylor Cohasset. LLC v. the Cohasset Sewer Commission , 
Suffolk Superior Court, C.A. No. 03-056 14A. 

Jerusalem Road Estates v. Sewer Commission , Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. 
No. 03-00103 

Matters Involving the Board of Health 

Susan Tehranian v. Board of Health , Norfolk Sup Ct, C.A. 
No.: 03-00828 

Matters Involving the Police Department 

Davenport v. Town of Cohasset et al .. Nor. Sup. Ct. 05-00720 
IBPO/NAGE and Town of Cohasset . AAA # 1 1 390 00376 05 
Local 641. International Brotherhood of Police Officers and 
the Town of Cohasset . JLMC-05-49P 

Claims pending: 

Paton V. Town of Cohasset D.P.W. 

Secure Horizon v. Town of Cohasset (Fire Department ) 

By letter dated July 9. 2004 

Les Constructions Beauce Atlas. Inc. . (Cohasset Public Schools) 



Respectfully submitted, 
Paul R. DeRensis 
TOWN COUNSEL 



25 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning and economic 
development district representing 101 cities and towns in metropolitan Boston, hi 
addition, the Council shares oversight responsibility for the region's federally funded 
transportation program as one of 14 members of the Boston Metropolitan Planning 
Organization. The Council's legislative mandate is to provide technical and professional 
resources to improve the physical, social and economic condition of its district, and to 
develop sound responses to issues of regional significance. The Council provides 
research, studies, publications, facilitation and technical assistance in the areas of land 
use and the environment, housing, transportation, water resources management, 
economic development, demographic and socioeconomic data, legislative policy and 
inter-local partnerships that strengthen the operation of local governments. More 
information about MAPC is available at www.mapc.org . 

The Council is governed by 101 municipal government representatives, 21 gubernatorial 
appointees, and 10 state and 3 City of Boston officials. An Executive Committee 
composed of 25 members oversees agency operations and appoints an executive director. 
The agency employs approximately 30 professional and administrative staff. Funding for 
Council activities is derived from contracts with government agencies and private 
entities, foundation grants, and a per-capita assessment charged to municipalities within 
the district. 

hi the past year, the Council has focused on initiatives that respond to regional 
challenges, some of which include: 

MetroFuture -- Making a Greater Boston Region: State law requires that MAPC 
prepare, from time to time, a comprehensive regional plan. This planning process is now 
underway and is called the MetroFuture initiative. It started by asking the people of 
Greater Boston about their aspirations for the future of the region, and continues with a 
comparison between those visions and the future that will arise if our current trends 
continue unchanged. We are finding both exciting prospects and interesting challenges 
lie ahead if we continue our current pattern of growth and development. Here are just a 
few of the results, out to the year 2030: 

• Population will grow slowly, while the number of households will grow more 
quickly. By 2030, the region's population will have increased by 10%, approximately 
a third as fast as the projected U.S. population growth (29%). The number of 
households is projected to increase by 19% for that same time period, at a greater rate 
than the population, due to a continued decline in household size. 

• Consumption of land continues apace. Fifteen percent of land that was open in 
2000 will be developed by 2030. 



26 



• An older population will demand more homes and health care. There will be 
declines in all age groups under 55 and substantial increases in empty nesters and 
elders, creating demand for different housing and contributing to an expected near 
tripling of health care costs from 2000 to 2030. 

• Water in short supply outside the MWRA. Communities with public water systems 
not connected to the MWRA system will face serious water constraints by 2030; 
approximately half will exceed their permitted withdrawal rates. 

These are among the results that will serve as a starting point for discussions across the 
region about alternative paths the region could take, beginning with a series of briefings 
early in 2006. Visit www.MctroFuture.org to learn more about the project, and contact 
MctroFuture@mapc.org to learn about how to host a briefing about the region's future. 

Municipal Planning: MAPC continues to assist municipalities in implementing Smart 
Growth Principles through local zoning changes. Under the Vision 2020 program, 
MAPC provided zoning analyses or draft bylaws to the towns of Duxbury, Stoughton and 
Hanover. Through FY05 funding from Smart Growth Technical Assistance Grants, 
MAPC assisted Topsfield in developing a Low Impact Development storm-water and 
erosion control bylaw. Under funding secured through the Priority Development Fund, 
MAPC is developing mixed use or multi-family bylaws for the towns of Bedford, Stow, 
Millis, Southborough and Stoughton. Just recently. MAPC received notice of approval of 
its application for Smart Growth Technical Assistance funds to assist the towns of 
Hopkinton, Ashland and Southborough in examining alternative futures for the 900-acre 
Weston Nurseries property. MAPC also continues to provide information to 
municipalities regarding the Smart Growth Overlay Districts enabled under Chapter 40R. 

Metro Mayors Coalition: MAPC works with the mayors and city managers of 10 
municipalities in the urban core on issues such as group purchasing, employee health 
insurance, regional public safety, and municipal public finance. Through this work, 
MAPC staffed the statewide Municipal Finance Task Force which reached consensus on 
a variety of public policy changes to reinvigorate the partnership between local and state 
government. We also formulated an SI 1 million grant program to fund inter-local and 
multi-disciplinary approaches to stemming the tide of youth violence, drug use, and gang 
activities in the region. This program became law late in 2005. 

The Metro Data Center, an official US Census affiliate, provides in-depth analysis of 
trends in the region and conducts research on emerging issues that will strengthen the 
Council's ability to plan for the future. The Center works to increase public 
understanding of and access to demographic, social, economic and land use data and 
trends that affect the Boston metropolitan area. The Center also releases regular 
publications to maintain a general awareness about how growth continues to impact 
communities. The Center provides current accurate data to legislators, municipalities, 
public and private agencies, and the general public about growth trends in the 
communities and sub regions of the greater Boston area. 



27 



Transportation planning: MAPC staff played an active role in helping to revise the 
MassHighway Design Manual, now known as the Project Development and Design 
Guidebook. As vice chair of the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization, MAPC 
worked to develop the annual Transportation Improvement Program, including 
transportation spending priorities for the region. We also developed population and 
employment projections to the year 2030, to be used in scenario modeling in the new 
Regional Transportation Plan and MetroFuture (see above) in 2006. 

Legislative Advocacy: The Legislative Committee has worked to promote legislation 
that is of regional interest and is informed by smart growth principles (visit 
http://www.mapc.org/regional planning/MAPC Smait Growth.html to view the list of 
principles). 

At the beginning of the legislative session the Committee recommended for endorsement 
a full legislative agenda, which was subsequently endorsed by MAPC's Executive 
Committee. Among many items, the priorities include reform of the state's surplus land 
disposition policy; recapitilization of the brownfields redevelopment fund; reform of the 
state's antiquated zoning laws; and repeat offender legislation. Contact Legislative 
Director Joel Barrera at jbarrera @ mapc.org to learn more about the committee's 
priorities and how your community can get involved in regional advocacy efforts. 

Metropolitan Highway System Advisory Board: MAPC staffs this board, established 
in 1997 by the Commonwealth to advise the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority on issues 
relative to land use, air rights, zoning, and environmental impacts associated with 
development of land owned by the authority, hi 2005, the Board reviewed a number of 
Requests for Proposals and development proposals for various parcels along the Central 
Artery surface. 

Regional Services Consortiums: The Regional Consortiums Project collectively 
procured more than $3,000,000 in office supplies for 32 municipalities, and highway 
maintenance services valued at $16,000,000 for South Shore and Metro West cities and 
towns. The project also facilitates collegial forums among members' chief administrative 
officers that focus on collective problem solving and resource sharing. MAPC, in 
partnership, with the Greater Boston Police Council, assists over 300 units of local 
government in procuring police, public works and general use vehicles, along with 
various public safety supplies. 

Public Safety and Homeland Security: MAPC provides planning and fiduciary services 
to the Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC), the 
Northeastern Law Enforcement Council (NEMLEC) and the Metropolitan Law 
Enforcement Council (METROLEC). Activities include procurement, research, and 
planning to enhance the delivery of public safety services and to ensure the region is 
prepared for either a terrorist attack or natural disaster. 



28 



Hazard Mitigation: Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) plans help communities prepare for 
natural disasters such as floods, winter storms, wind, and geologic hazards. In 2005, 
MAPC completed PDM plans for 10 communities on the North Shore and 10 
communities on the South Shore. MAPC is also developing PDM plans for 9 Inner Core 
communities, including Boston and neighboring communities, which will be completed 
in 2006. FEMA has awarded a grant to MAPC to develop PDM plans in 28 towns in the 
MAGIC, Metro West, and North Suburban subregions, beginning in 2006. 

495/MetroVVest Water Resources Strategy: Working with the 495/MetroWest Corridor 
Partnership. MAPC completed three major components of a comprehensive water 
strategy for the corridor: 

■ The Massachusetts Low Impact Development Toolkit, available at 
http://w\vvv.mapc.org/lid.html , was published and two regional workshops were 
held to present the toolkit to the public. The toolkit recently received the 2005 
Outstanding Planning Project Award from the Massachusetts Chapter of the 
American Planning Association; 

■ Once Is Not Enough, a guide to water reuse in Massachusetts, was published. It is 
available at hitp://www.mapc.org/rcgi()nal pianning/waterreuse.html ; and 

■ two regional contracts for Leak Detection Services were developed for both the 
495/MetroWest communities, as well as all the entire MAPC region. Learn more 
about leak detection services that are available to cities and towns in MAPC's 
January edition of the Regional Record, our electronic newsletter, located at 
www.mapc.org . 

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy: Every five years, the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council is responsible for developing a Comprehensive Economic 
Development Strategy (CEDS) in partnership with the Economic Development 
Administration. The 2005 CEDS, Insuring Greater Boston's Prosperity, contains an 
analysis of economic trends and conditions and highlights five challenges to economic 
well being. It sets a context for inviting regional participation that moves toward a 
regional response to the challenges. The report is included in the January edition of 
MAPC's Regional Record, available at www.mapc.org . 

Wind Power: Using a grant from the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, MAPC 
recently completed a project to help ten North Shore coastal communities understand 
opportunities and obstacles to siting land-based wind turbines on municipally-controlled 
properties. The project helped the communities to identify regulatory barriers to wind, 
and the environmental and financial impacts of a wind project. Area residents took part 
in a web-based energy survey and each community received wind information and siting 
maps. MAPC hosted two wind educational forums as part of the project, helped the city 
of Lynn to draft a wind turbine siting ordinance and facilitated the creation of Alternative 
Energy Committees in Gloucester, Swampscott and Rockport to advance the siting of 
wind turbines in their communities. Information about the North Shore Wind Project is 
also included in the January Regional Record at vvwvv.mapc.org . 



29 



MEPA Project Reviews: MAPC reviews projects under the Massachusetts 
Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) and submits comments on projects with significant 
regional impacts. In 2005, MAPC reviewed 166 MEPA filings (Environmental 
Notification Forms, Environmental Impact Reports, and Notices of Project Change), and 
submitted comments to EOEA on 58 of these. One of the most significant reviews of the 
year was a "Peer Review" conducted by MAPC and the Old Colony Planning Council on 
the proposed Village Center Plan for the former South Weymouth Naval Air Station. 
Visit http://www.mapc.org/whats new/SWNAS/SWNAS Summary Document.pdf to 
view our comments. 

South Shore Coalition 

In 2005, the South Shore Coalition (SSC), one of the eight subregions of MAPC, met on 
a monthly basis to discuss issues of mutual interest from drinking water supply. 
Redevelopment of the South Weymouth Naval Air Station, and transportation issues. 
SSC is comprised of the communities of Cohasset, Duxbury, Hanover. Hingham, Hull, 
Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Rockland, Scituate, and Weymouth. 

During the year, SSC heard presentations regarding and provided input to MAPC's 
actions relating to the following regional transportation issues:, 2005 Transportation 
Improvement Program, the Greenbush Commuter Rail project, UPWP Braintree Split 
Study, and the UPWP Route 53 Corridor Study. SSC participated on the Regional 
Transportation Advisory Committee (RTAC), developed a set of subregional legislative 
priority issues to help guide MAPC's priorities, and reviewed the ongoing efforts of 
redevelopment taking place at the now closed South Weymouth Naval Air Station. The 
subregion was briefed periodically on the MetroFuture project, the on-going review of 
the subregions that is taking place in conjunction with the MAPC strategic planning 
process, and other activities of MAPC. 

MAPC Annual Report prepared and submitted by Marc D. Draisen, Executive 
Director, Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 



30 



REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK 



As the year 2005 comes to a close, I respectfully submit my fourteenth report as Town 
Clerk. This year we had two elections and two town meetings, conducted the annual 
census, issued dog licenses, business certificates, etc. Those results follow this report. 

For quite some time, the Massachusetts Registry of Vital Records and Statistics have 
urged the clerks throughout the Commonwealth not to list individual births, deaths and 
marriages in our annual town reports. Because of the potential risk of fraud, stolen 
identities and the safety of our citizens, I have decided not to publish these records 
individually but will include the number of vital events that have occurred over the year. 

On October 29, 2004 the Governor signed into law Chapter 388 of the Acts of 2004 
(House Bill 75). This law eliminated the premarital medical certificate requirement for 
marriage in Massachusetts. Therefore, effective January 28, 2005 (90 days after signing) 
medical certificates were no longer required. 

As always. I would like to extend my appreciation to the citizens of Cohasset, town 
officials, department heads, town employees, election workers, committees and to my 
assistant for their support and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



31 



Index Annual Town Meeting - April 2, 2005 



Article # Description of Article 

1 Accept town report. Adopted unanimously. 

2 Hear and act on reports. Adopted unanimously. 

3 Operating budget. Adopted. 

4 Community Preservation Fund 

a. Recommendation A - Funding Sub Accounts - Adopted unanimously. 

b. Recommendation B - Housing Authority improvements. Adopted 
unanimously. 

c. Recommendation C - Restoration to Captain John Wilson House. 
Adopted unanimously. 

d. Remaining balance retained - Adopted unanimously. 

5 Unpaid bills from previous year. Adopted unanimously. 

6 Additional appropriations Fiscal Year 05. Adopted 

7 Zoning Bylaw - Demolition delay. Motion defeated. 

8 Zoning Bylaw - Land alteration. Motion defeated. 

9 Zoning Bylaw - Large home plan review. Withdrawn. 

10 Zoning Bylaw - Section 8 amendments. Motion defeated. 

11 Feasibility study funding - Sewer Commission. Adopted. 

12 Little Harbor /Atlantic Ave project funding. Adopted. 

13 Deep Run/Rust Way project funding. Adopted. 

14 Betterments 50/50 - Sewer Commission. Adopted. 

15 Water Department - donation of land - Adopted unanimously. 

16 General Bylaw - Financial reporting. Adopted. 

17 General Bylaw - Revolving & Enterprise fund reporting. Adopted. 

18 Water Department - water rates and project funding. Adopted 

19 Assessors Compensation. Adopted 

20 Alternative Energy Committee. Adopted unanimously. 

21 General Bylaw - Vernal pools. Adopted. 



32 



Annual Town Meeting - April 2, 2005 

At the Annual Town Meeting held on Saturday, April 2, 2005 at the Cohasset High 
School Sullivan Gymnasium the following articles were contained in the warrant and 
acted upon as follows. 

Checkers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 9:30 a.m. were Carol St. 
Pierre, Janice Rosano. Debra Kmpczak, Kathleen Rhodes, Margaret Heman and 
Geraldine Ainslie. Tellers were appointed and sworn in by the Moderator, George L. 
Marlette III. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order at 10:10 a.m. and a quorum of 100 was present 
at that time. The registered voters checked in on the voting list totaled for Precinct 1 - 
316 and Precinct 2 - 152 for a grand total of 468 voters. A moment of silence was 
observed for Pope John Paul II. 

Citizens recited the pledge of allegiance. 

Voted unanimously to dispense with the reading of the call of the Meeting and Return of 
Service having been examined by the Moderator and found to be in order. 

Article 1: 

To act upon the reports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual Town 
Report for 2004. 

MOVED that the reports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual Town 
Report for 2004 be accepted and filed with the permanent records of the Town. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 2: 

To hear the reports of any Committee heretofore chosen and act thereon. 

Michael Sullivan gave a report for the Board of Selectmen. A report of the School 
Investigation Committee was given by Richard Avery and Gabriel Gomez. 

MOVED that the reports of any committees heretofore chosen be heard and accepted. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

It was moved by Alex Koines to advance articles 16 and 17. 

Motion defeated. 



33 



Article 3; 

To see if the Town will vote to fix salaries and compensation of Elected Officers, and to 
see what sums the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from available funds or 
otherwise, for the payment of the salaries and compensation, expenses, equipment and 
outlays, capital and otherwise, of the several Town Departments, for the ensuing fiscal 
year. 



34 



Dept. 

No. Appropriation 



APPENDIX A 
TOWN MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATIONS, ARTICLE 3 

Town 
Department IVIanager 
Budget Budget Request Recommend. 

Fiscal 2004 FIscai 2005 Fiscai 2006 FIscai 2006 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
114 Moderator; 

Personal Services 
122 Selectmen: 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
129 Town Manager: 

Personal Services 

Town Hall Clerical 

General Expenses 
131 Advisory Committee: 

General Expenses 
133 Reserve Fund: 

Reserve Fund 
135 Director of Finance 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
141 Assessors: 

Personal Services-Elected 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 

Revaluation 
145 Treasurer-Collector 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
151 Legal: 

Town Counsel 
161 Town Clerk: 

Personal Services-Elected 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 

Capital Outlay 
171 Conservation Commission: 

General Expenses 

175 Planning Board 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 

176 Zoning Board of Appeals: 

General Expenses 
195 Town Reports: 

General Expenses 
197 Parking Clerk: 

General Expenses 
199 Unclassrfied: 

Audit of Accounts 

Water Purchase 

So Shore Coalition 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



573 



295,000 



27,800 



573 



573 



180,000 



180,000 



54,455 


54,455 


57,119 


13,833 


16,466 


12,670 


9,706 


10,562 


9,135 








16,250 



27,800 



37,800 



573 



5,500 


5,500 


5,500 


5,500 


135,832 


66,012 


66,800 


58,800 


41,500 








105,475 


105,475 


115,000 


115,000 


420,990 


399,263 


423,147 


422,148 


6,360 


6,360 ■ 


6,600 


6,550 


345 


345 


345 


345 


100,000 


167,000 


125,000 


125,000 


87,865 


87,865 


92,639 


92,639 


27,300 


35,300 


30,300 


28,968 


3,700 


3,700 


3,700 


3,700 


59,682 


60,320 


62,130 


62,130 


11,505 


11,505 


13,055 


11,855 





20,000 


5,000 





62,769 


62,969 


65,002 


65,002 


42,750 


42,750 


42,750 


40,450 



150,000 

57,119 

11,307 

8,735 



37,400 



30,000 


30,000 


30,900 


10,300 


14,730 


14,730 


14,730 


4,400 


4,385 


4,385 


4,385 


4,385 


16,000 


16,000 


16,000 


15,000 


2,500 


2,500 


2,500 


2,000 


8,500 


8,500 


8,500 


8,500 


45,000 


67,000 


67,000 


50,000 


4,000 


4,000 


4,000 


4,000 


1,638,055 


1,511,335 


1,518,530 


1,401,806 



35 



Dept. 

No. Appropriation 



APPENDIX A 
TOWN MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATIONS, ARTICLE 3 

Town 
Department Manager 
Budget Budget Request Recommend. 

Fiscai 2004 FIscai 2005 Fiscal 2006 Fiscai 2006 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

210 Police: 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

220 Fire: 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 
Hydrant Services 

241 Building Inspector: 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 

242 Plumbing & Gas Inspector: 
General Expenses 

244 Weights & Measures: 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 

245 Wire: 

General Expenses 
291 Civil Defense: 

Salaries & Expenses 

295 Harbor: 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 

296 Shellfish Constable: 

Personal Services 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



1,571,318 

106,850 

28,000 


1,519,634 

103,850 

28,000 


1,618,472 

114,840 

28,840 


1,531,197 

95,750 




1.529,669 

156,520 

27,414 


1,468,462 

159,610 

67,414 


1,610,393 
213,145 
155,495 


1,572,642 

147,345 

67,414 


62,140 
3,955 


62,140 
3,955 


67,700 
5,550 


67,700 
5,400 



6,500 



6,500 



,000 



8,000 



2,600 


2,600 


2,600 


2,600 


450 


450 


450 


450 


16,500 


16,500 


17,500 


17,500 


450 


450 


5,450 


5,350 


61,153 


61,153 


62,589 


62,589 


7,400 


7,400 


7,400 


5,100 


500 


500 
3,508,618 


500 


500 


3,581,419 


3,918,924 


3,589,537 



SCHOOLS 
300 Cohasset Public Schools: 
Salaries & Expenses 



11,418,829 12,037,300 12,869,382 12,869,382 



301 Vocational Assessment 


59,238 


86,988 


95,770 


95,770 


TOTAL SCHOOLS 


11,478,067 


12,124,288 


12,965,152 


12,965,152 


422 Public Works 










Personal Sep«/ices 


690,671 


694,605 


727,764 


700,327 


General Expenses 


508,454 


562,840 


542,945 


521,751 


423 Snow Removal 


50,626 


50,626 


51,156 


51,156 


426 Maintenance Division 










Payroll & Expenses 


373,445 


426,822 


456,056 


456,056 


424 Street Lighting 










General Expenses 


55,890 


55,890 


58,000 


58,000 


TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


1,679,086 


1,790,783 


1,835,921 


1,787,290 



36 



Dept. 

No. Appropriation 



APPENDIX A 
TOWN MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATIONS, ARTICLE 3 

Town 
Department IVIanager 
Budget Budget Request Recommend. 

Fiscal 2004 Fiscai 2005 Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2006 



440 Sewer 

General Expenses 

TOTAL SEWER 

510 Board of Health: 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
541 Council on Aging: 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
543 Veterans' Services: 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
599 Commission on Disabilities: 

General Expenses 

TOTAL HEALTH & WELFARE 

610 Library: 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 
630 Recreation: 

Personal Services 

General Expenses 

690 Common Historical District 

General Expenses 

691 Historic Preservation 

Personal Services 
General Expenses 

692 Celebrations: 

General Expenses 

TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 



814,264 



814,264 



102,541 
12,241 

122,417 
30,825 

1,600 
1,000 

100 

270.724 



324,056 
78,833 

1 16,505 

6,380 

200 



871,678 



871,678 



877,315 



877,315 



126,274 
12,241 

122,617 
36,605 

1,600 
1,000 

100 

300,437 



130,412 
13,980 

129,188 
40,967 

1,600 
1,000 

100 

317,247 



336,878 
84,418 

116,505 
6,380 

200 



371,144 
118,211 

118,490 
6,380 

200 



875,315 
875,315 



123,527 
12,100 

126,972 
31,160 

1,600 
425 

100 



295,884 



355,683 
100,211 

118,425 
6,380 

200 



800 


800 


800 


.800 


200 


200 


200 


200 


2,500 


2,500 


2,500 


2,500 


529,474 


547,881 


617,925 


584,399 



710 Principal: 

General Expenses 

751 Long Term Interest 
General Expenses 

752 Excluded Debt 
General Expenses 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 



1,033,271 
390,109 

2,381,703 



1,014,301 1,152,935 

421,322 418,085 

2,366,540 3,216,270 



1,152,935 

418,085 

3,216,270 



3,805,083 3,802,163 4,787,290 



4,787,290 



37 



Dept. 

No. Appropriation 



APPENDIX A 
TOWN MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATIONS, ARTICLE 3 

Town 
Department Manager 
Budget Budget Request Recommend. 

Fiscal 2004 Fiscal 2005 Fiscal 2006 Fiscal 2006 



91 1 Pensions: 



Norfolk County 


679,498 


843,884 


1,003,173 


1,003.173 


Non-Contributory 


3,400 


3,400 


3,400 





912 Workers' Compensation: 










General Expenses 


71,829 


105,000 


105,000 


90,000 


913 Unemployment: 










General Expenses 


5,000 


5,000 


5,000 


5,000 


914 Health Insurance: 










General Expenses 


1,731,715 


1,873,251 


2,059,000 


1,966,000 


915 Life Insurance: 










General Expenses 


5,200 


6,760 


8,000 


8,000 


916 Medicare Tax 










General Expenses 


149,000 


175,000 


190,000 


190,000 


945 Property & Liability Insurance 










General Expenses 


180,000 


230,000 


243,750 


222,500 


TOTAL BENEFITS & INSURANCE 


2,825,642 


3,242,295 


3,617,323 


3,484,673 


450 Water Department: 










General Expenses 


770.187 


888,100 


1,069,320 


1,069,320 


Town Hall Services 


31,296 


31,296 


31,296 


31,296 


Maturing Debt-Principal 


656,910 


663,160 


708,531 


708,531 


Maturing Debt-Interest 


371,545 


406,279 


446,331 


446,331 


Capital 


100,000 


100,000 


100,000 


100,000 


TOTAL WATER 


1,929,938 


2,088,835 


2,355,478 


2,355,478 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


28,551,752 


29,788,313 


32,811,105 


32,126,824 


General Government 


1,638,055 


1,511,335 


1,518,530 


1,401,806 


Public Safety 


3,581,419 


3,508,618 


3,918,924 


3,589,537 


Education 


11,478,067 


12,124,288 


12,965,152 


12,965,152 


Public Works 


1,679,086 


1,790,783 


1,835,921 


1,787,290 


Sewer 


814,264 


871,678 


877,315 


875,315 


Health & Welfare 


270,724 


300,437 


317,247 


295,884 


Culture & Recreation 


529,474 


547,881 


617,925 


584,399 


Debt 


3,805,083 


3,802,163 


4,787,290 


4,787,290 


Benefits & Insurance 


2,825,642 


3,242,295 


3,617,323 


3,484,673 


Water 


1,929,938 


2,088,835 
29,788,313 


2,355,478 


2,355,478 


TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 


28,551,752 


32.811,105 


32,126,824 



38 



APPENDIX B 
SALARIES AND RATE SCHEDULES FY 2006 











3% 










GRADE 


1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 


5th 


6th 


7th 


A 


Hourly 


9 86 


1042 


10.98 


11 54 


12.11 


12 68 


1325 




35 Hrs 


34506 


36473 


384.38 


404 04 


4237 


443 85 


46383 




40Hrs 


394 35 


416 84 


439 29 


461 77 


484 23 


507 26 


530 09 


B 


Hourly 


10.65 


11 26 


11 87 


1248 


13 05 


13 66 


1428 




35 Hrs 


372 58 


394 21 


41535 


436 97 


45664 


478 27 


499 79 




40 Hrs 


425 81 


450 53 


474 68 


499 4 


521 87 


546 6 


571 19 


C 


Hourly 


11 53 


1215 


12 79 


1343 


14 1 


1479 


15 45 




35 Hrs 


403 55 


42518 


447 79 


469 91 


493 5 


51758 


540 88 




40 Hrs 


461 2 


485 92 


511 76 


537 04 


564 


591 52 


618 14 


D 


Hourly 


12 43 


1316 


13 83 


1455 


15 27 


15 97 


16 69 




35 Hrs 


435 01 


460 57 


484 16 


509 23 


534 3 


558 88 


584 03 




40 Hrs 


497 16 


526 37 


553 32 


581 98 


610 63 


638 72 


667 46 


E 


Hourly 


1341 


142 


14 93 


157 


16 47 


17 25 


18.02 




35 Hrs. 


469 42 


496 94 


522 51 


549 54 


57657 


603 61 


630 77 




40 Hrs 


536 48 


567 93 


597 15 


628 04 


65894 


689 84 


720 88 


F 


Hourly 


14 48 


15 32 


1612 


16 91 


17 78 


1861 


1945 




35 Hrs 


506 78 


536 26 


564 28 


591 81 


622 29 


651 29 


680 59 




40 Hrs 


579 17 


612 87 


644 9 


676 36 


711 19 


744 33 


777 82 


G 


Hourly 


15 66 


16 52 


17 43 


18 31 


192 


20 05 


20 96 




35 Hrs 


548 06 


578 05 


610 


640 96 


671 93 


701 92 


733 5 




40 Hrs 


626 36 


660 63 


697 14 


732 53 


767 92 


802 19 


838 29 


H 


Hourly 


1689 


17 85 


1882 


198 


20 73 


21 68 


22.66 




35 Hrs 


591 32 


62474 


658 66 


693 06 


725 5 


758 93 


79308 




40 Hrs 


675 8 


713 99 


752 76 


792 07 


829 15 


867 35 


906 38 


1 


Hourly 


18 26 


19 27 


20 32 


21 35 


22 39 


23 43 


2448 




35 Hrs 


639 


674 39 


711 26 


747 14 


783 51 


819 88 


85678 




40 Hrs 


730 28 


77073 


81286 


853 87 


895 44 


937 01 


979 17 


J 


Hourly 


197 


20 8 


21 92 


2302 


24.2 


25 32 


2646 




35 Hrs 


689 63 


727 97 


767 29 


805 63 


84692 


886 24 


926 12 




40 Hrs 


788 14 


831 96 


876 9 


920 72 


967 91 


1,01284 


1,058 42 


K 


Hourly 


21 29 


22 47 


23 72 


24 9 


26 11 


27 33 


2856 




35 Hrs 


745 17 


786 46 


830 21 


871 5 


913.77 


956 53 


999 57 




40 Hrs 


851 62 


89881 


948 81 


996 


1,044 31 


1,09318 


1,142 36 


L 


Hourly 


23 


24 32 


25 63 


26 94 


28 23 


29 51 


30.83 




35 Hrs 


805 14 


85134 


897 06 


942 77 


987 99 


1,032,72 


1,079 19 




40 Hrs. 


920 16 


972 96 


1,025 21 


1,077 45 


1,12913 


1,180 25 


1,233 36 



M Hourly 24 86 26 22 27 64 29 06 30 48 3189 33 33 



39 



35Hrs. 870 02 917,7 967.35 1,016.99 1,066 64 1,116 28 1,166 51 

40Hrs 994 31 1,048 80 1,105 54 1,162.27 1,219 01 1,275 75 1,333 15 



N Hourly 26 81 28 33 29 86 31.35 32 89 

35Hrs 938 35 99143 1,045 01 1,097.11 1,15118 

40Hrs 1,072 39 1,133 07 1,194 29 1,253.84 1,315 64 



34 42 35 97 

1,204 75 1,258 97 
1,376 86 1,438 82 



Hourly 28 97 30 6 32 27 33 93 35 56 

35Hrs 1,01404 1,07106 1,12955 1,187.56 1,24457 

40Hrs 1,158.91 1,224 07 1,290 92 1,357 21 1,422 36 



37 19 38 86 
1,30160 1,360 17 
1,487 54 1,554 48 



40 



Schedule 1 - Regular Employees 



PAY POSITIONS 

GROUP AUTHORIZED SCHEDULE HOURS 



Board of Assessors 

Deputy Assessor/Appraiser 
Assistant Assessor 
Administrative Assistant 

Building Department 

Building Commissioner/7x)ning Officer 
Clerk 

Civilian Dispatch 

Communications Supervisor 
Communications Officer 
Communications Officer 

Elder Affairs 
Director 

Outreach Coordinator 
Volunteer Coordinator 

Van Driver 
Clerk 

Fire Department 

Fire Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Firefighter - EMT 
Firefighter - Paramedic 
Harbor Department 

Harbormaster 



Contract 


1 




40 


H 


1 


7 


35 


G 


1 


7 


35 


Contract 


1 




40 


E 


1 


7 


21 


H 


1 


1 


40 


F 


3 


1 


40 


F 


2 


1 


16 


Contract 


1 




40 


I 


1 


1 


28 


G 


1 


1 


18 


F 


2 


1 


19 


G 


1 


1 


15 


Contract 


1 




40 


FS- 13 


4 


5 


42 


FS- 12 


9 


5 


42 


FS- 10 


4 


5 


42 


FS- 11 


11 


5 


42 



Contract 



40 



Board of Health 

Office Manager/Inspector 
Health Agent 

Library 

Chief Librarian 
Staff Librarian 
Staff Librarian 
Library Assistant 
Library Technician 
Library Technician 



Contract 


1 




40 


Contract 


1 




15 


Contract 


1 




40 


L5 


1 


6 


35 


L5 


1 


6 


32 


L4 


1 


6 


32 


L3 


1 


6 


35 


L3 


1 


6 


19 



41 



Senior Clerk 



L2 



35 



Planning Board/Conservation Commission 
Town Planner 
Secretary 

Police Department 
Police Chief 
Sergeant 
Patrolman 
Secretary 

Department of Public Works 
Superintendent 
General Foreman 
Working Foreman 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Skilled Utility Worker 
Tree Climber 
Maintenance Worker 
Maintenance Worker 

Skilled Utility Worker - Cemetery 
Administrative Assistant 



Contract 


1 




8 


G 


1 . 


7 


25 


Contract 


1 




40 


PS- 11 


5 


4 


37.5 


PS -09 


13 


4 


37.5 


G 


1 


7 


40 


Contract 


1 




40 


K 


1 




40 


I 


4 




40 


G 


4 




40 


F 


2 




40 


F 


1 




40 


F 


1 




40 


G 


1 




40 


F 


1 




40 


G 


1 




30 



Recreation 
Director 



Contract 



40 



Board of Selectmen 

Administrative .A.ssistant/Human Resources 
Secretary/Receptionist 



H 
F 



40 
35 



Director of Finance/Town Accountant 
Director of Finance/Town Accountant 
Assistant Town Accountant 



Contract 
G 



40 
25 



Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 



40 



Town Manager 
Town Manaeer 



Contract 



40 



Treasurer/Collector 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assistant Treasurer/Collector 
Assistant to Treasurer 



Contract 


1 




40 


H 


1 


7 


40 


G 


1 


7 


35 



42 



Schedule la - Elected Employees 



Town Clerk 

Clerk, Board of Registrars 

Moderator 

Board of Selectmen: 

Chair 

Members (4) at $1,000 
Board of Assessors 

Chair 

Members (2) at $1,200 



$57,119 

$329 
$1 

$1,500 
$4,000 

$1,300 
$2,400 



Schedule 2a - Part Time Positions Annual 



Veterans' Agent 


$1,600 


Member, Board of Registrars 


$326 


Sealer of Weights and Measurers 


$2,600 


Town Archivist 


$600 


Director of Emergency Management 


$350 


Assistant Director of Emergency Management 


$100 


Shellfish Constable 


$500 


Animal Control Officer 


$13,770 


Keeper of the Town Clock 


$100 


Keeper of the Town Pump 


$100 


Schedule 2b - Part Time Positions Hourly** 




Assistant Harbor Master 


$12.00 


Casual Labor 


$6.75 


Election Officers 


$10.00 


Election Clerk 


$10.00 


Election Warden 


$10.00 


Summer Patrolman 


$14.00 


Police Matron 


$13.00 


Deputy Building Inspector (H-Min) 


$16.89 


Library Pages 


$8.00 


Recording Secretary 


$12.07 



Schedule 3 - Part Time Positions 
Constable - Per Notice 



$20.00 



Schedule 4 - Informational Only 
Police Department 



(Collectiye Bargaining Unit) 



Schedule 5 - Informational Only 
Fire Department 



(Collective Bargaining Unit) 



43 



Schedule 6 - Informational Only 

Library (Collective Bargaining Unit) 

Schedule 7 - Informational Only 

Municipal Clerical and Custodial (Collective Bargaining Unit) 

Exempt Positions - Per the Fair Labor Standards Act 

Deputy Assessor Appraiser Chief Librarian 

Building Commissioner Police Chief 

Director of Finance/Town Accountant Recreation Director 

Elder Affairs Director Superintendent of Public Works 

Fire Chief Town Manager 

Harbormaster Treasurer/Collector 

Health Agent Town Planner 

Director of Facilities 



44 



CAPITAL BUDGET - APPENDIX C 







TOWN OF COHASSET 












CAPITAL BUDGET 












FY 2005 TO FY 2009 






















DEPARTMENTJITEM 


2004 


200S 


2006 


2007 


200B 


2009 














Board of Selectmen 




























Pnvate Ways Repair 


S25.000 


j 550,000 


525.000 


$25,000 


$25,000 


Hartor Seawall 




5600 000| 








Border Street Bndge 


; 550.000 








Sandy Beach ParVing Lot 


t 


$75,000 






Forest Avenue Sidewalk 










Beechwood Street Sidewalk 




5100,000 








1 












Police Department 












1 












Cruiser Replacement Program 


560,000 556,000 


570,000 


$60 000 


$60,000 


560.000 


Police Station Construction 










54 000.000 




Portable Radio Replacement 














Computer Upgrades 






$30,000 








Cruiser Radio Replacement 


534.000 


























fire Department 




























Replace Chiefs Vehide 




535.000 








Refurbish Engine One 


540,000 










Replace Ambulance 








$150,000 






Replace Engine Two 












5300,000 
















School Department 




























School Bus Replacement 


$60,000 






$60,000 


$60,000 


$600,000 


Technology Upgrades 






$100,000 


$100,000 


$100,000 


$100,000 
















Department of Public Works 




























Loam and Seed Town Common/Inc SpnnWer System 






560.000 








Replace Sidewalk on Town Common 




510.000 








Replace Vehicles 


$62,000 










Replace 1986 Dump Truck 


575 000 








Replace 1982 Ford Bucket Truck 1 $100,000 








New Mowing Machine 


525 000 






Replace 1988 International 








$80,000 






Replace 1985 CAT Loader 










5150 000 




Replace 1988 655 Loader and Backhoe 








585.000 




Replace 1989 Petert>ilt 






5100.000 


1 










Paul Pratt Library 


























Upgrade OCLN Terminals 






512.000 


$1Z000 


$12,000 


$12,000 






































GRAND TOTAL S179 000 S758,00o' $692,000 


$587,000 


$4 492 000 


51,197,000 



45 



MOVED that Thirty One Million Eight Hundred Eighty Six Thousand Eight Hundred 
Twenty Four ($31,886,824) Dollars be appropriated for the Fiscal Year 2006 Annual 
Town Budget to be allotted as follows: $66,649 for salaries of elected Town Officials 
consisting of the Town Clerk $57,119; Clerk, Board of Registrars $329.00; Moderator, 
$1.00; Selectmen, Chairman, $1,500.00; Members (4) at $1,000.00, $4,000.00; Board of 
Assessors, Chairman, $1,300.00; Members (2); at $1,200.00, $2,400.00; and the 
remaining $31,820,175 for Personal Services, Expenses and Capital Outlays, interest on 
Maturing Debt and other charges for various departments as recommended for purposes 
in Appendix A as attached to these Town Manager's Recommended Motions for the 
2005 Annual Town Meeting and Appendix B of the Warrant for the 2005 Annual Town 
Warrant, a copy of which Appendices are incorporated here by reference, and to meet the 
appropriation, the following transfers are made: 



$2,355,478 


from Water Revenue 


$ 


875,325 


from Sewer Revenue 


$ 


325,000 


from Free Cash 


$ 


75,000 


from Overlay Surplus 


$ 


80,000 


from Pension Reserve 


$ 


11,645 


from Waterways Fund 


$ 


10,000 


from Wetlands Fund 



$ 50,000 from Sale of Burial Lots 

And the remaining balance of $28,104,376 is raised from taxation and other general 
revenues of the Town; and further that the Salary Rate and Schedule as printed in the 
Warrant and shown in Appendix B be adopted. 

Corrections to appendix A under Schools Dept. 300 - recommended for fiscal 2006 is 
$12,533,612 with a total for schools of $12,629,382 and the total operating budget of 
$31,886,824. 

Motion adopted. 

Proclamation offered by Roseanne McMorris, member of the Board of Selectmen. 

WHEREAS, George Marlette has served as the Town Moderator from 1992 to 2005; and 

WHEREAS, he has also served for five years on the Board of Registrars and three years 
on the School Facilities Committee; and 

WHEREAS he has dedicated his time and efforts to ensure the citizens of Cohasset a 
safe and effective Town Meeting. 

NOW, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED, that we the Board of Selectmen of the Town of 
Cohasset are honored to recognize him as a valued member of this community, and 
acknowledge with great admiration the positive results that his spirit of volunteerism and 
kindness has achieved. 



46 



GIVEN under our hands and the seal of the TOWN OF COHASSET this second day of 
April in the year Two Thousand Five. 

Proclamation adopted unanimously. 

Article 4: 

To see if the Town will vote to adopt and approve the recommendations of the 
Community Preservation Committee for Fiscal Year 2006, and to see if the Town will 
vote to implement such recommendations by appropriating a sum or sums of money from 
the Community Preservation Fund established pursuant to Chapter 44B of the General 
Laws, and by authorizing the Board of Selectmen, with the approval of the Community 
Preservation Committee to acquire, by purchase, gift or eminent domain such real 
property interests in the same of the Town, or enforceable by the Town, including real 
property interests in the form of permanent affordable housing restrictions and historical 
preservation restrictions that will meet the requirements of Chapter 184 of the General 
Laws, as may be necessary or proper to carry out the foregoing. 

Recommendation A: 

MOVED that Fiscal Year 2006 revenues to the Community Preservation Fund be divided 
to the following sub accounts to be administered by the Community Preservation 
Committee as follows: 

Historical Resources Sub Account (10%) 5 53,769.00 

Open Space Sub Account (10%) S 53.769.00 

Community Housing Sub Account (10%) $ 53,769.00 

Total Budget $161,307.00 

Motion adopted unanimously. 
Recommendation B : 

MOVED that Fifty Three Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty Nine (353,769.00) Dollars be 
transferred from the Community Preservation Fund Housing Sub Account and Three 
Hundred Forty Six Thousand Two Hundred Thirty One ($346,231.00) be transferred 
from the Community Preservation Fund, for a total of Four Hundred Thousand 
(5400,000.00) Dollars, with the intention that these funds be available in Fiscal 2005 and 
thereafter, which funds are to be expended by the Town Manager for the purposes of 
making various improvements to the Cohasset Housing Authority's 60 Elm Street 
Apartment Complex, provided however, because the funds appropriated herein are 
represented to be only a portion of the funds necessary to complete the 
improvements, this appropriation shall not be expended by the Town Manager, nor 
the transfers voted in this motion shall not be implemented, unless, prior to the end of 
Fiscal Year 2006, the Cohasset Housing Authority has demonstrated to the Town 
Manager's satisfaction, that all additional funds necessary for the completion of the 



47 



improvements have been secured and is in place, whether through donations, grants, or 
other sources of funds, to supplement the appropriation contained in this motion, and 
provided further that in the event the Housing Authority fails to make this demonstration 
by that date, then this appropriation shall expire and the transfers herein voted shall not 
come to pass, so that the money appropriated herein will remain in the Community 
Preservation Fund Housing Sub Account and the Community Preservation Fund in the 
amounts as set forth above as of June 30, 2006. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Recommendation C: 

MOVED that the sum of Ninety Thousand Four Hundred Ninety Eight ($90,498.00) 
Dollars be transferred from the Community Preservation Fund Historical Resources Sub 
Account and the sum of Nine Thousand Seven Hundred Forty Six ($9,746.00) Dollars be 
transferred from the Community Preservation Fund, for a total sum of One Hundred 
Thousand Two Hundred Forty Four ($100,244.00) Dollars, to be expended by the Town 
Manager for the purposes of performing restoration work to the Cohasset Historical 
Society's Captain John Wilson House and all other related work, provided, however, that 
the Board of Selectmen be hereby authorized to acquire in return for such sum a historic 
preservation restriction in compliance with Chapter 184 of the General Laws and the 
specific work items be performed with the prior approval of the Community Preservation 
Committee. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 
Recommendation D; 

MOVED that any remaining balance in the Community Preservation Fund in Fiscal 2006 
be retained for future Community Preservation Committee Recommendations and action 
by Town Meeting. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 5; 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, 
and/or borrow, pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, to be 
expended by the Town Manager, to pay for unpaid bills from previous fiscal years. 

VENDOR AMOUNT REQUESTED 

Deutsch, Williams, Brooks, DeRensis $59,455.00 

MOVED that Fifty Nine Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Five ($59,455.00) Dollars be 
appropriated, to be expended by the Town Manager to pay for unpaid bills from previous 
fiscal years, as follows: 



48 



VENDOR 



AMOUNT 



Deutsch. Williams. Brooks, DeRensis 



$59,455.00 



And to meet this appropriation, the sum of Fifty Nine Thousand Four Hundred Fifty-Five 
(559,455.00) Dollars be transferred from the unexpended balance of Article 7 of the 2003 
Annual Town Meeting. 

An 8/10's vote required. Motion adopted by the required 8/10's. 

Article 6: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, and/or transfer from available 
funds, a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town Manager, needed by various 
departmental budgets and appropriations to complete the fiscal year ending June 30, 
2005. 



Department Budget 

Advisory Comm. Reserve Fund 
Legal Expenses 
Police Department Salaries 
Fire Department Salaries 
School Dept. Expenses 
Building Maintenance Expenses 
Unemployment Expenses 



Request 

$100,000.00 
$ 40,000.00 
$100,000.00 
$ 75,000.00 
SI 00.000.00 
S 30,000.00 
S 16,000.00 



Purpose 

School Expenses 
Town Counsel 
Overtime Shortfall 
Overtime Shortfall 
Various Expenses 
Various Expenses 
Various Expenses 



MOVTD that Four Hundred Sixty One Thousand ($461,000) Dollars, be hereby 
transferred to the Fiscal 2005 budgetary items set forth below amending the amounts 
appropriated by the Town pursuant to Article 3 of the 2004 Annual Town Meeting 
(which appropriations may have been amended at the December 6, 2004 Special Town 
Meeting), which funds after transfer are to be expended by the Town Manager, to 
supplement certain departmental budgets and appropriations set forth below to complete 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 2005, as follows. 

Transfer Funds to: 

Advisory Comm. Reserve Fund $ 1 00,000.00 

Legal Expenses $ 40,000.00 

Police Department Salaries $ 1 00,000.00 

Fire Department Salaries $ 75,000.00 

School Dept. Expenses S 1 00,000.00 

Building Maintenance Expenses $ 30,000.00 

Unemployment Expenses $ 16.000.00 
TOTAL AMOUNT TRANSFERRED $461,000.00 



49 



And to fund these transfers. Four Hundred Sixty One Thousand (5461,000.00) Dollars be 
transferred from the unexpended balance of Article 7 of the 2003 Annual Town Meeting. 

Motion adopted. 

Resolution offered by Frederick Koed, member of the Board of Selectmen. 

WHEREAS, Martha K. Gjesteby 

Has served for nine years on the Board of Selectmen, 1987 through 1996. 

Has served two terms on the School Committee 1979 through 1986. 

Has served on numerous other elected and appointed committees such as Capital Budget, 
Planning Board, MAPC, Historic Commission and other community organizations over a 
thirty year period of time.. 

Now, THEREFORE, Be it resolved, 

That the citizens of Cohasset, in Town Meeting assembled, on this Z"'' day of April 2005, 
express their sincere appreciation to Martha K. Gjesteby for her guidance, her leadership 
and her service. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 
Article 7 : 

To amend the Zoning Bylaw of the Town by adding a new Section 17 as follows: 

17. Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings 

17.1. Purpose: 

This bylaw is adopted to protect and preserve buildings within the Town which reflect or 
constitute distinctive features of the architectural, cultural, economic, political or social 
history of the Town and to encourage the preservation and restoration rather than 
demolition of such buildings. By furthering these purposes the public welfare shall be 
promoted, making the Town a more attractive and desirable place in which to live, learn 
and work, while maintaining the historic flavor and diversity of same. 

To achieve this purpose the Cohasset Historic Commission is empowered to advise the 
Building Inspector with respect to the issuance of permits for demolition, and to hold 
hearings and make determinations as set forth below. The Commission shall offer its 
advice and expertise to owners of any building within the town that may fall within the 
terms of this by-law. 

17.2. Definitions: 



50 



Commission - Cohasset Historical Commission 

Demolition - the intentional act of pulling down, destroying, removing, or razing a 
building or commencing the work of total or substantial destruction with intent of 
completing same. 

Noncontributing - a building that is listed by the National Park Service as not 
contributing to the historical value of the District in which it is located. 

Premises - The parcel of land on which the building is located 

Regulated Building - a building that satisfies one or more of the following criteria: 

1. All buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, either 
individually or as components of National Register Historic Districts in 
Cohasset, except those officially designated as being "non-contributing" 
buildings: 



'c- 



2. All buildings listed on the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places, 
either individually or as components of the Massachusetts State Register 
of Historic Places in Cohasset except those officially designated as being 
"non-contributing"" buildings: 

3. Buildings listed in publication of the Cohasset Bicentennial Committee 
entitled "Town of Cohasset "Heritage Trail" first issued in 1970 as 
amended by the Cohasset Historical Society in 1999 (the published list). 
Copies of the published list shall be on file and available for review by 
members of the public at the office of the Town clerk and at the 
Commission's office. The published list is herby incorporated by 
reference in this Section 17. 

4. Buildings one hundred (100) years or more in age associated with one or 
more historic persons or events, or with broad architectural, cultural, 
economic, political or social history of the Town. 

5. Buildings one hundred (100) years or more in age historically or 
architecturally significant in terms of period style, method or building 
constructions or association with a significant architect or builder either by 
itself or as part of a group of buildings. 



51 



17.3. Procedures: 



1. No permit for the demolition of any building shall be issued other than in 
conformity with this Section 17. Upon receipt of an application for a 
demolition permit, the Building hispector shall forward a copy of the 
permit application to the Commission. 

2. The Building Inspector shall initially determine if a building is a 
potentially Regulated Building, either by inclusion on a federal, state or 
local register or by reason of age. Any building the age of which cannot be 
reasonably determined by the Building hispector shall be referred to the 
Commission. If then referred to the Commission, within thirty (30) days, 
the Commission shall hold and conclude a public hearing for the purpose 
of determining whether or not the building is a "regulated building." The 
Commission shall publish a notice of the hearing in a newspaper of local 
circulation at least one week preceding the date of the public hearing, 
noting the date, location, and subject of the hearing. The applicant for the 
demolition permit shall pay for such notice. The Commission shall 
provide notice of such hearing to the applicant by mail, postage prepaid, at 
least one week before the hearing. No less than ten (10) business days 
after the close of the public hearing on the demolition permit, the 
Commission shall make its determination and notify the applicant in 
writing stating its reasons with a copy to the Building Inspector. 

3. If the Commission determines that the building is not regulated by this 
bylaw, it shall sign the permit immediately and forward it to the Building 
Inspector who shall issue the permit, provided it otherwise meets all 
application requirements. 

4. If the Commission determines that the building is a "Regulated Building", 
the Building Inspector shall not issue a demolition permit for a period of 
six (6) months from the date of notification to the Building Inspector. 
During this period, the applicant is expected to work with the Commission 
to make a reasonable, good faith effort to identify alternatives to 
demolition in order to preserve, relocate or rehabilitate the building. 

5. In addition to all other available enforcement remedies, if the said building 
is torn down without the necessary demolition permit, no building permit 
to rebuild or construct at the premises will be issued for a period of three 
(3) years, 

6. Nothing in this Section, "Demolition of Historically Significant 
Buildings" shall prohibit the Building Inspector, Board of Health or other 
legally authorized public official from ordering the immediate demolition 
of any building which is determined to be imminently dangerous or unsafe 
to the public. The Building Inspector, Board of Health or other legally 



52 



authorized public official shall file a copy of any such order of emergency 
demolition with the Commission. 

MOVED that the Cohasset Zoning Bylaw be hereby amended by inserting a new Section 
17 to the Zoning Bylaw, as follows: 

17. Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings 

17.1. Purpose: 

This bylaw is adopted to protect and preserve buildings within the Town which reflect or 
constitute distinctive features of the architectural, cultural, economic, political or social 
history of the Town and to encourage the preservation and restoration rather than 
demolition of such buildings. By furthering these purposes the public welfare shall be 
promoted, making the Town a more attractive and desirable place in which to live, learn 
and work, while maintaining the historic flavor and diversity of same. 

To achieve this purpose the Cohasset Historic Commission is empowered to advise the 
Building Inspector with respect to the issuance of permits for demolition, and to hold 
hearings and make determinations as set forth below. The Commission shall offer its 
advice and expertise to owners of any building within the town that may fall within the 
terms of this by-law. 

17.2. Definitions: 

Commission - Cohasset Historical Commission 

Demolition - the intentional act of pulling down, destroying, removing, or razing a 
building or commencing the work of total or substantial destruction with intent of 
completing same. 

Noncontribuling - a building that is listed by the National Park Service as not 
contributing to the historical value of the District in which it is located. 

Premises - The parcel of land on which the building is located 

Regulated Building - a building that satisfies one or more of the following criteria: 

1. All buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, either 

individually or as components of National Register Historic Districts in 
Cohasset, except those officially designated as being "non-contributing" 
buildings: 



•c- 



All buildings listed on the Massachusetts State Register of Historic Places, 
either individually or as components of the Massachusetts State Register 
of Historic Places in Cohasset except those officially designated as being 
"non-contributing" buildings: 



53 



Buildings listed in publication of the Cohasset Bicentennial Committee 
entitled "Town of Cohasset "Heritage Trail" first issued in 1970 as 
amended by the Cohasset Historical Society in 1999 (the published list). 
Copies of the published list shall be on file and available for review by 
members of the public at the office of the Town clerk and at the 
Commission's office. The published list is herby incorporated by 
reference in this Section 17. 

Buildings one hundred (100) years or more in age associated with one or 
more historic persons or events, or with broad architectural, cultural, 
economic, political or social history of the Town. 

Buildings one hundred (100) years or more in age historically or 
architecturally significant in terms of period style, method or building 
constructions or association with a significant architect or builder either by 
itself or as part of a group of buildings. 



17.3. Procedures: 



1. No permit for the demolition of any building shall be issued other than in 
conformity with this Section 17. Upon receipt of an application for a 
demolition permit, the Building Inspector shall forward a copy of the 
permit application to the Commission. 

2. The Building Inspector shall initially determine if a building is a 
potentially Regulated Building, either by inclusion on a federal, state or 
local register or by reason of age. Any building the age of which cannot be 
reasonably determined by the Building Inspector shall be referred to the 
Commission. If then referred to the Commission, within thirty (30) days, 
the Commission shall hold and conclude a public hearing for the purpose 
of determining whether or not the building is a "regulated building." The 
Commission shall publish a notice of the hearing in a newspaper of local 
circulation at least one week preceding the date of the public hearing, 
noting the date, location, and subject of the hearing. The applicant for the 
demolition permit shall pay for such notice. The Commission shall 
provide notice of such hearing to the applicant by mail, postage prepaid, at 
least one week before the hearing. No less than ten (10) business days 
after the close of the public hearing on the demolition permit, the 
Commission shall make its determination and notify the applicant in 
writing stating its reasons with a copy to the Building Inspector. 

3. If the Commission determines that the building is not regulated by this 
bylaw, it shall sign the permit immediately and forward it to the Building 
Inspector who shall issue the permit, provided it otherwise meets all 
application requirements. 



54 



4. If the Commission determines that the building is a "Regulated Building", 
the Building Inspector shall not issue a demolition permit for a period of 
six (6) months from the date of notification to the Building Inspector. 
During this period, the applicant is expected to work with the Commission 
to make a reasonable, good faith effort to identify alternatives to 
demolition in order to preserve, relocate or rehabilitate the building. 

5. In addition to all other available enforcement remedies, if the said building 
is torn down without the necessary demolition permit, no building permit 
to rebuild or construct at the premises will be issued for a period of three 
(3) years. 

6. Nothing in this Section, "Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings" 
shall prohibit the Building Inspector. Board of Health or other legally 
authorized public official from ordering the immediate demolition of any 
building which is determined to be imminently dangerous or unsafe to the 
public. The Building Inspector, Board of Health or other legally authorized 
public official shall file a copy of any such order of emergency demolition 
with the Commission. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion is defeated. 

Representative Garrett Bradley was recognized at this time. 

Resolution offered by Robert Spofford, member of the Board of Selectmen. 

WHEREAS, Roseanne M. McMorris has served for nine years as a Selectmen of the 
Town; and 

WHEREAS, she has also served for four years on the Conservation Commission, and 
currently serves on the Senior Housing Committee; and 

WHEREAS, she has displayed great strength of purpose in the search for solutions to the 
ever-changing problems engendered by a vital community. 

NOW, therefore, BE IT RESOLVED, m Town Meeting assembled on the 2"^^ day of 

April 2005, we the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Cohasset acknowledge with 
gratitude the large role she has played in the efforts of those volunteers who have served 
well in the interest of the general welfare of their fellow townspeople. 

GIVEN under our hands and the seal of the TOWN OF COHASSET this second day of 
April in the year Two Thousand Five. 

Resolution adopted unanimously. 



55 



Article 8: 

That Section 11 of the Zoning Bylaw, '"Regulations Governing Earth Removal", be 
stricken in its entirety, and replaced with the following: 

Section 1 1 - Earth Removal, Land Clearing & Land Alteration 

11.1 Purpose 

The purpose of this section is to: 

A) To protect the health, safety and property of the residents of the Town of Cohasset 
by: 

1) regulating clearing, grading and earth removal activities associated with 
residential land development; 

2) preserving as much as practicable existing trees, vegetation and land forms; 

3) preventing erosion and sedimentation and controlling stormwater runoff; 

4) minimizing fragmentation of wildlife habitat and loss of vegetation; and 

B) To promote land development and site planning practices that is responsive to the 
Town's scenic character without preventing the reasonable development of land. 

11.2 Definitions: 

hi this section, the following words have the meanings indicated: 

Clearing - Removal or causing to be removed, through either direct or indirect actions, 
trees, shrubs, topsoil, subsoil and gravel, and/or ledge (but only such ledge that 
does not constitute Exposed Ledge Face as defined herein and any vegetation 
upon it) from a site, or any material change in the use or appearance of the land. 
Actions considered to be clearing include, but are not limited to: causing 
irreversible damage to roots or trunks; destroying the structural integrity of 
vegetation; and/or any filling, excavation, grading, or trenching in the root area of 
a tree which has the potential to cause irreversible damage. 

Excavating - The act of removing pre-existing, topsoil, subsoil, rock, gravel or ledge by 
digging, blasting or any other means. 

Exposed Ledge Face - Any portion of rock ledge lying above a height of two feet or 
greater above pre-existing grade at any given point. 

Developed Lot - A lot having existing building(s) and structure(s) upon it. 

Filling - The act of transporting or placing additional, new material onto the pre-existing 
surface of the land. 



56 



Grading - Any excavating, filling, clearing, or movement of earth, or the creation of 
impervious surface, or any combination thereof, which alters the existing surface 
of the land. 

Total Cleared Area - The total area of the lot that has been subjected to clearing, 
excavating, grading or filling by human activity including but not limited to the 
portion which is covered by buildings, structures or other impervious material per 
the definition of Lot Coverage. 

Undeveloped Lot - A lot having no existing building(s) and structure(s) upon it. 

11.3 Applicability, Standards & Exemption 

A) Applicability 

1) Any project in any zoning district involving clearing, excavating, filling or 
grading activities conducted in connection with new construction, 
reconstruction or replacement of a residential building or structure, shall be 
subject to the following Land Alteration Standards, absent grant of a special 
permit by the Planning Board as the permit granting authority, or unless such 
activities are specifically exempted from this section. Any clearing, 
excavating, filling or grading activity conducted on an undeveloped lot within 
one year prior to a proposal to conduct any of the building activities listed 
above shall be presumed to have been made in connection with that activity 
and thus subject to the limitations of this section. 

2) Notwithstanding the above-stated applicability of this section to residential 
development, with respect to commercial activities this Section 1 1 shall not 
overRile or negate the applicability of any other provision of this Zoning 
Bylaw regarding commercial uses or structures; thus, this section does not 
authorize commercial mining, quarrying, sand & gravel, earth removal or 
timber removal activities or other activities prohibited elsewhere in the Zoning 
Bylaw. Clearing, excavating, filling or grading activities on commercial lots 
shall be governed by the site plan review process set forth in section 12.6. 

3) This section does not preclude review of a proposed building or structure 
that would be subject to section 5.5 of this Zoning Bylaw. 

B) Land Alteration Standards 

1) In the case of clearing on developed lots, the total cleared area, including pre- 
existing cleared area together with the proposed cleared area, shall be no more 
than 50% of the lot. With respect to a developed lot that already exceeds 50% 
total cleared area, a structure that otherwise complies with the Zoning Bylaw 
may be added within that lot's previously-cleared area without the need for 
relief under this section. 

2) In the case of clearing on undeveloped lots, total cleared area shall be no more 
than 50%. 



57 



3) In the case of excavating of soils, gravel or ledge (but only such ledge that 
does not constitute Exposed Ledge Face as defined herein), such excavation 
and removal shall be limited to no more than ten (10) cubic yards in the 
aggregate in any twelve-month period. 

4) In the further case of excavating, and in the case of filling and grading, 
finished elevation shall differ from pre-existing elevation by no more than five 
feet at any point. 

5) Exposed Ledge Face shall not be excavated, chipped, blasted or otherwise 
altered. 

6) Clearing for utility trenching shall be limited to the minimum area necessary 
to maneuver a backhoe or other construction equipment. Roots should be cut 
cleanly rather than pulled or ripped out during utility trenching. Tunneling for 
utilities installation should be utilized wherever feasible to protect root 
systems of trees. 

C) Exemptions - The following activities are exempt from the above limitations: 

1) The removal of soil and subsurface material necessarily excavated in 
connection with the lawful construction of a building, structure, sewage 
system, or other utility, provided that the quantity of material removed 
does not unnecessarily exceed that actually displaced by the portion of the 
building, structure, road, driveway, sidewalk, or path below finished 
grade. 

2) Construction and maintenance of public and private streets and utilities 
within town-approved roadway layouts and easements; 

3) Work conducted in accordance with any prior and still-valid earth removal 
permit, special permit or building permit issued pursuant to the 
predecessor version of this Section 1 1 or other sections of the Cohasset 
Zoning Bylaw. 

4) Construction or installation of public utilities, if no other location on the 
lot is feasible. 

5) Exploratory work associated with the siting of a new or replacement 
individual sewage disposal system, provided that such activity shall be 
limited to the minimum area necessary to maneuver a backhoe or other 
construction equipment, and which is otherwise being monitored by the 
appropriate boards having jurisdiction. 

6) Construction of a replacement individual sewage disposal system, 
provided that such construction shall be limited to the minimum area 
necessary for all components and buffer zones needed for the system, and 
is otherwise permitted by the appropriate boards having jurisdiction. 

7) Non-commercial cutting for fuel, provided that clear-cutting does not 
occur. 

D) The Planning Board as special permit granting authority under this Section 1 1 
shall adopt and may from time to time amend rules relative to the issuance of such 
permits and shall file a copy of said rules in the office of the Town Clerk. 



58 



1 1 .4. Review and Decision 

A) A copy of any permit application before a board other than the Planning Board for 
work involving clearing, excavating, filling or grading activities shall be submitted 
to the Planning Board by the other board for determination as to whether the 
proposed clearing, excavating, filling or grading activity exceeds the Land 
Alteration Standards set forth in Section 11. 3B above or is an exempt activity. 
The Planning Board may authorize by special permit work that would exceed such 
standards providing that the Planning Board finds that such work: 

a. shall not be substantially more detrimental to the neighborhood if there 
were compliance with the Land Alteration Standards set forth in Section 
11.3B,and 

b. shall not be injurious or dangerous to the public health or environment or 
hazardous because of traffic congestion or other reason. 

B) The filing requirements and decision-making procedures, criteria and timelines set 
forth in Section 12.4 of this Zoning Bylaw and in applicable state statutes 
governing special permits, shall govern applications for special permits under this 
Section 11. with the exception that the Planning Board shall act as special permit 
granting authority under this Section 1 1. 

C) If the proposed project is a subdivision, then any review necessary under this 
section shall be decided in conjunction with the review and submission 
requirements for approval of the subdivision. 

11.5 Security 

The Planning Board may require a performance guarantee in a form acceptable to the 
Town to cover the costs associated with compliance with this section, in the same manner 
and on the same conditions as are applicable to performance guarantees related to 
subdivision projects as may then be applicable. 

11.6 Enforcement 

The Town may enforce this Section 1 1 through any means authorized by applicable law, 
including without limitation all means authorized pursuant to the Zoning Act, M.G.L. 
C.40A §1 et seq and pursuant to Section 12.2 of this Zoning Bylaw. 

11.7 Severability: 

If a court of competent jurisdiction holds any provision of this section invalid, the 
remainder of the section shall not be affected thereby. The invalidity of any section or 
sections or parts of any section or sections of this section shall not affect the validity of 
the remainder of the Town's zoning bylaw. 



59 



CITIZENS' PETITION 



NAME 

Tom Callahan 
Mark DeGiacomo 
Rick Swanborg 
Barbara Wallner 
John Beck 



ADDRESS 

35 Hillside Drive 
59 Beach Street 
48 Nichols Road 
40B Nichols Road 
44 Nichols Road 



NAME 

Alyson Callahan 
Lynne DeGiacomo 
Anne Swanborg 
Richard Cate 
Stacey Weaver 



ADDRESS 

35 Hillside Drive 
59 Beach Street 
48 Nichols Road 
40B Nichols Road 
44 Nichols Road 



MO\^D that Section 1 1 of the Zoning Bylaw, "Regulations Governing Earth Removal", 
be deleted in its entirety, and replaced with the following: 

Section 1 1 - Earth Removal, Land Clearing & Land Alteration 

ILl Purpose 

The purpose of this section is to: 

A) To protect the health, safety and property of the residents of the Town of Cohasset 
by: 

5) regulating clearing, grading and earth removal activities associated with 
residential land development; 

6) preserving as much as practicable existing trees, vegetation and land forms; 

7) preventing erosion and sedimentation and controlling stormwater runoff; 

8) minimizing fragmentation of wildlife habitat and loss of vegetation; and 

C) To promote land development and site planning practices that is responsive to the 
Town's scenic character without preventing the reasonable development of land. 

11.2 Definitions: 

In this section, the following words have the meanings indicated: 

Clearing - Removal or causing to be removed, through either direct or indirect actions, 
trees, shrubs, topsoil, subsoil and gravel, and/or ledge (but only such ledge that 
does not constitute Exposed Ledge Face as defined herein and any vegetation 
upon it) from a site, or any material change in the use or appearance of the land. 
Actions considered to be clearing include, but are not limited to: causing 
irreversible damage to roots or trunks; destroying the structural integrity of 
vegetation; and/or any filling, excavation, grading, or trenching in the root area of 
a tree which has the potential to cause irreversible damage. 

Excavating - The act of removing pre-existing, topsoil, subsoil, rock, gravel or ledge by 
digging, blasting or any other means. 



60 



Exposed Ledge Face - Any portion of rock ledge lying above a height of two feet or 
greater above pre-existing grade at any given point. 

Developed Lot - A lot having existing building(s) and structure(s) upon it. 

Filling - The act of transporting or placing additional, new material onto the pre-existing 
surface of the land. 

Grading - Any excavating, filling, clearing, or movement of earth, or the creation of 
impervious surface, or any combination thereof, which alters the existing surface 
of the land. 

Total Cleared Area - The total area of the lot that has been subjected to clearing, 
excavating, grading or filling by human activity including but not limited to the 
portion which is covered by buildings, structures or other impervious material per 
the definition of Lot Coverage. 

Undeveloped Lot - A lot having no existing building(s) and structure(s) upon it. 

11.3 Applicability, Standards & Exemption 
B) Applicability 

1) Any project in any zoning district involving clearing, excavating, filling or 
grading activities conducted in connection with new construction, 
reconstruction or replacement of a residential building or structure, shall be 
subject to the following Land Alteration Standards, absent grant of a special 
permit by the Planning Board as the permit granting authority, or unless such 
activities are specifically exempted from this section. Any clearing, 
excavating, filling or grading activity conducted on an undeveloped lot within 
one year prior to a proposal to conduct any of the building activities listed 
above shall be presumed to have been made in connection with that activity 
and thus subject to the limitations of this section. 

2) Notwithstanding the above-stated applicability of this section to residential 
development, with respect to commercial activities this Section 1 1 shall not 
overrule or negate the applicability of any other provision of this Zoning 
Bylaw regarding commercial uses or structures; thus, this section does not 
authorize commercial mining, quarrying, sand & gravel, earth removal or 
timber removal activities or other activities prohibited elsewhere in the Zoning 
Bylaw. Clearing, excavating, filling or grading activities on commercial lots 
shall be governed by the site plan review process set forth in section 12.6. 

3) This section does not preclude review of a proposed building or structure that 
would be subject to section 5.5 of this Zoning Bylaw. 

E) Land Alteration Standards 

7) In the case of clearing on developed lots, the total cleared area, including pre- 
existing cleared area together with the proposed cleared area, shall be no more 



61 



than 50% of the lot. With respect to a developed lot that already exceeds 50% 
total cleared area, a structure that otherwise complies with the Zoning Bylaw 
may be added within that lot's previously-cleared area without the need for 
relief under this section. 

8) In the case of clearing on undeveloped lots, total cleared area shall be no more 
than 50%. 

9) In the case of excavating of soils, gravel or ledge (but only such ledge that 
does not constitute Exposed Ledge Face as defined herein), such excavation 
and removal shall be limited to no more than ten (10) cubic yards in the 
aggregate in any twelve-month period. 

10) In the further case of excavating, and in the case of filling and grading, 
finished elevation shall differ from pre-existing elevation by no more than five 
feet at any point. 

11) Exposed Ledge Face shall not be excavated, chipped, blasted or otherwise 
altered. 

12) Clearing for utility trenching shall be limited to the minimum area necessary 
to maneuver a backhoe or other construction equipment. Roots should be cut 
cleanly rather than pulled or ripped out during utility trenching. Tunneling for 
utilities installation should be utilized wherever feasible to protect root 
systems of trees. 

F) Exemptions - The following activities are exempt from the above limitations: 

8) The removal of soil and subsurface material necessarily excavated in 
connection with the lawful construction of a building, structure, sewage 
system, or other utility, provided that the quantity of material removed does 
not unnecessarily exceed that actually displaced by the portion of the building, 
structure, road, driveway, sidewalk, or path below finished grade. 

9) Construction and maintenance of public and private streets and utilities 
within town- approved roadway layouts and easements; 

10) Work conducted in accordance with any prior and still- valid earth removal 
permit, special permit or building permit issued pursuant to the predecessor 
version of this Section 1 1 or other sections of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaw. 

11) Construction or installation of public utilities, if no other location on the 
lot is feasible. 

12) Exploratory work associated with the siting of a new or replacement 
individual sewage disposal system, provided that such activity shall be 
limited to the minimum area necessary to maneuver a backhoe or other 
construction equipment, and which is otherwise being monitored by the 
appropriate boards having jurisdiction. 

13) Construction of a replacement individual sewage disposal system, 
provided that such construction shall be limited to the minimum area 
necessary for all components and buffer zones needed for the system, and 
is otherwise permitted by the appropriate boards having jurisdiction. 

14) Non-commercial cutting for fuel, provided that clear-cutting does not 
occur. 



62 



G) The Planning Board as special permit granting authority under this Section 1 1 
shall adopt and may from time to time amend rules relative to the issuance of such 
permits and shall file a copy of said rules in the office of the Town Clerk. 

11.4. Review and Decision 

D) A copy of any permit application before a board other than the Planning Board for 
work involving clearing, excavating, filling or grading activities shall be submitted 
to the Planning Board by the other board for determination as to whether the 
proposed clearing, excavating, filling or grading activity exceeds the Land 
Alteration Standards set forth in Section 11. 3B above or is an exempt activity. 
The Planning Board may authorize by special permit work that would exceed such 
standards providing that the Planning Board finds that such work: 

c. shall not be substantially more detrimental to the neighborhood if there 
were compliance with the Land Alteration Standards set forth in Section 
11.3B,and 

d. shall not be injurious or dangerous to the public health or environment or 
hazardous because of traffic congestion or other reason. 

E) The filing requirements and decision-making procedures, criteria and timelines set 
forth in Section 12.4 of this Zoning Bylaw and in applicable state statutes 
governing special permits, shall govern applications for special permits under this 
Section 1 1, with the exception that the Planning Board shall act as special permit 
granting authority under this Section 1 1. 

F) If the proposed project is a subdivision, then any review necessary under this 
section shall be decided in conjunction with the review and submission 
requirements for approval of the subdivision. 

11.5 Security 

The Planning Board may require a performance guarantee in a form acceptable to the 
Town to cover the costs associated with compliance with this section, in the same manner 
and on the same conditions as are applicable to performance guarantees related to 
subdivision projects as may then be applicable. 

1 1 .6 Enforcement 

The Town may enforce this Section 1 1 through any means authorized by applicable law, 
including without limitation all means authorized pursuant to the Zoning Act, M.G.L. 
C.40A §1 et seq and pursuant to Section 12.2 of this Zoning Bylaw. 



63 



11.6 Severability: 

If a court of competent jurisdiction holds any provision of this section invaUd, the 
remainder of the section shall not be affected thereby. The invalidity of any section or 
sections or parts of any section or sections of this section shall not affect the validity of 
the remainder of the Town's zoning bylaw. 

Amendment by Mark Degiacomo. Add to 11. 3 A) Applicability 1) 3^^ sentence after 
structure the words specifically excluding additions to existing structures and to delete 
the word reconstruction as it appears in the motion. Amendment adopted unanimously. 

A 2/3's vote is required. Main motion as amended is defeated. 

Article 9: 

That Section 5.5 of the Zoning Bylaw, "Large House Plan Review", be amended as 
follows: 

First, by deleting section 5.5.2 and replacing it with the following: 

5.5.2 Where the RGFA exceeds these limits, the proposed work shall be submitted for a 
Special Permit to the Planning Board as the permit-granting authority. The 
Planning Board may approve or approve with conditions by a majority vote a 
Large House special permit after a public hearing only where such conditions and 
safeguards as required by this bylaw have been made, and only after a 
determination that such approval would not be detrimental to the public health, 
safety, welfare, comfort, or the convenience of the community and would not be 
adverse to the town's economy or environment. In the case where the proposed 
Large House is an addition to or replacement of a pre-existing building, there 
shall also be a determination that the new structure is not substantially more 
detrimental to the surrounding area than the pre-existing building. 

The following criteria shall be applied to the review of these applications, where 
applicable: 

a. See section 12.4(l)(b)(l), (2) & (3), incorporated by reference. 

b. Use of building design and massing, building materials and architectural 
techniques that place the building in harmony with the prevailing character and 
scale of buildings in the surrounding area. 

c. Selection of a location on the lot, including the use of setbacks greater than the 
minimum required, integration into the existing terrain and surrounding 
landscape, and building orientation, in such a way to avoid or mitigate any 
differences in architectural scale from that prevailing in the surrounding area. 

d. Retention of existing mature trees and other vegetation and addition of new 
landscaping features to visually soften the impact of house construction. 



64 



h. 



Avoidance of use of wetlands, and minimization of use of steep slopes, 

floodplains and hilltops. 

Preservation of natural or historic features of the site, and minimization of 

vegetation and soil removal, blasting and grade changes. 

Maximum retention of open space. 

Treatment of the areas within the front yard setback in a manner consistent with 

that prevailing in the surrounding area, unless inappropriate for other reasons, and 

use of defining elements such as fences, walls or hedges that are prevalent in 

other residences along the street. 

Avoidance of prominent on-lot automobile impact through location and 

orientation of garage entrances, use of curved driveway alignments and narrow 

driveway widths as they approach the street, and other means. 

Site design being configured to avoid large changes in existing grades and earth 

removal, and avoidance of use of planting species not either indigenous to or 

common within the surrounding area. 

Consideration being given to abutting properties, such as by protecting their 

privacy, access to sun and light and water views, screening utilities and 

objectionable features, minimizing adverse constniction impacts from dust, noise 

and traffic, and preser\ing the integrity of existing vegetation that abuts or 

overhangs property boundaries. 



Second, by adding to section 5.5.4 a new subparagraph (e) as follows: 

(e) A special permit granted under this section shall lapse after two years, including the 
time to pursue or await determination of any appeals, if substantial use or construction 
has not commenced, except for good cause shown. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Tom Callahan 
Mark DeGiacomo 
Richard Swanborg 
Barbara Wallner 
John Beck 



35 Hillside Drive 
59 Beach Street 
48 Nichols Road 
40B Nichols Road 
44 Nichols Road 



Alyson Callahan 
Lynne DeGiacomo 
Anne Swanborg 
Richard Gate 
Stacey Weaver 



35 Hillside Drive 
59 Beach Street 
48 Nichols Road 
40B Nichols Road 
44 Nichols Road 



MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 



65 



Article 10: 

Parti: 

That the following be added to the list of definitions in Section 2 of the Zoning Bylaw: 

New Construction - The erection of all or a portion of a building or structure on a lot 
where: 

a) No building or structure has existed previously (virgin land), or 

b) where a building or structure had existed previously but has not existed for the 
period of time necessary to deem the use abandoned as defined herein (abandoned 
use). 

Expansion/Extension/Enlargement - Any construction that increases the size of the 
footprint, height, width or bulk of an existing building or structure, without demolition 
involved. 

Demolition Full: The complete removal of a pre-existing building or structure down to its 
foundation, whether voluntary or involuntary. The pre-existing foundation, however, 
need not be removed for a building or structure to be deemed to have been fully 
demolished. Synonymous with "raze" or "razing". 

Partial: The removal of a portion of a pre-existing building or structure, whether or not 
down to its foundation, and whether voluntary or involuntary. 

hivoluntary - Action with regard to a building, structure or lot resulting from a casualty 
loss. 

Reconstruction - Any construction to repair an existing building or structure, for reasons 
of casualty or maintenance, that does not increase the size of the footprint, height, width 
or bulk of the existing building or structure. 

Replacement - Any construction to take the place of or restore a partial demolition, or to 
take the place of and substitute for a full demolition, and whether or not such replacement 
is on the same foundation, within the same footprint or in the same location as the 
previous building or structure, or portion thereof. 

Voluntary - Action with regard to a building, structure or lot resulting from the property 
owner's election or choice. 

Part II: 

And to further make the following amendments to Section 8 of the Zoning Bylaw, "Non- 
Conforming Uses, Structures and Lots", as follows: 



66 



A) In Section 8.3, introductory paragraph, first line, by inserting the words "new 
construction of after "hereof, " 

B) By striking subsection Section 8.7 in its entirety, and replacing it with the following: 

1) The voluntary expansion/extension/enlargement, reconstruction or 
replacement of a non-conforming single family or two-family building or 
structure may be undertaken as of right as long as the 
expansion/extension/enlargement, reconstruction or replacement complies 
in all respects with the Area Regulations set forth in Section 5.3.1, 
including lot size, and does not increase any nonconformity. 

2) In all other cases where the preceding subsection (1) does not apply, the 
board of appeals may authorize by special permit, the voluntary 
expansion/exlension/enlargement, reconstruction or replacement of an 
existing nonconforming building or structure provided that the board finds 
that such expansion/extension/enlargement, reconstruction or replacement: 
shall not be substantially more detrimental than the existing non- 
conforming use to the neighborhood, and shall not be injurious or 
dangerous to the public health or hazardous because of traffic congestion 
or other reason. 

C) By striking subsection 8.9 in its entirety, and replacing it with the following: 

A building or structure devoted to a non-conforming use (whether in whole or in part) 
and a building or structure non-conforming in some manner pursuant to Section 5.3.1, 
may, if involuntarily demolished, fully or partially, and not deemed abandoned, may be 
reconstructed or replaced, within the same portion of the lot, provided that the exterior 
dimensions of any vertical section do not exceed that of the original building or structure, 
provided that there is no increase in any nonconformity of the original use or building or 
structure and provided further that the reconstruction or replacement be substantially 
completed within three years with respect to buildings and structures for residential uses 
and two years with respect to buildings and structures for business use, of the date of the 
involuntary demolition or damage. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



NA\IE 



ADDRESS 



Tom Callahan 3 
Mark DeGiacomo 
Richard Swanborg 
Barbara Wallner 
Stacey Weaver 



5 Hillside Drive 
59 Beach Street 
48 Nichols Road 
40B Nichols Road 
44 Nichols Road 



Allison Callahan 
Lynne DeGiacomo 
Anne Swanborg 
Richard Cate 
John Beck 



35 Hillside Drive 
59 Beach Street 
48 Nichols Road 
40B Nichols Road 
44 Nichols Road 



MOVED that Section 2 and Section 8 of the Cohasset Zoning Bylaw be hereby amended 
as follows: 



67 



First Amendment : by inserting in Section 2 the following new definitions: 

New Construction - The erection of all or a portion of a building or structure on a lot 
where: 

a) No building or structure has existed previously (virgin land), or 

b) where a building or structure had existed previously but has not existed for the 
period of time necessary to deem the use abandoned as defined herein (abandoned 
use). 

Expansion/Extension/Enlargement - Any construction that increases the size of the 
footprint, height, width or bulk of an existing building or structure, without demolition 
involved. 

Demolition 

- Full: The complete removal of a pre-existing building or structure down to its 
foundation, whether voluntary or involuntary. The pre-existing foundation, however, 
need not be removed for a building or structure to be deemed to have been fully 
demolished. Synonymous with "raze" or "razing". 

- Partial: The removal of a portion of a pre-existing building or stmcture, whether or not 
down to its foundation, and whether voluntary or involuntary. 

Involuntary - Action with regard to a building, structure or lot resulting from a casualty 
loss. 

Reconstruction - Any construction to repair an existing building or structure, for reasons 
of casualty or maintenance, that does not increase the size of the footprint, height, width 
or bulk of the existing building or structure. 

Replacement - Any construction to take the place of or restore a partial demolition, or to 
take the place of and substitute for a full demolition, and whether or not such replacement 
is on the same foundation, within the same footprint or in the same location as the 
previous building or stmcture. or portion thereof. 

Voluntary - Action with regard to a building, structure or lot resulting from the property 
owner's election or choice. 

Second Amendment : Section 8 of the Zoning Bylaw, "Non-Conforming Uses, Structures 
and Lots" be hereby amended, as follows: 

A) In Section 8.3, introductory paragraph, first line, by inserting the words "new 
construction of after "hereof, " 

B) By deleting subsection Section 8.7 in its entirety, and replacing it with the following: 



68 



1) The voluntary expansion/extension/enlargement, reconstruction or 
replacement of a non-conforming single family or two-family building or 
structure may be undertaken as of right as long as the 
expansion/extension/enlargement, reconstruction or replacement complies 
in all respects with the Area Regulations set forth in Section 5.3.1, 
including lot size, and does not increase any nonconformity. 

2) In all other cases where the preceding subsection (1) does not apply, the 
board of appeals may authorize by special permit, the voluntary 
expansion/extension/enlargement. reconstruction or replacement of an 
existing nonconforming building or structure provided that the board finds 
that such expansion/extension/enlargement, reconstruction or replacement: 
shall not be substantially more detrimental than the existing non- 
conforming use to the neighborhood, and shall not be injurious or 
dangerous to the public health or hazardous because of traffic congestion 
or other reason. 

C) By deleting subsection 8.9 in its entirety, and replacing it with the following: 

A building or structure devoted to a non-conforming use (whether in whole or in part) 
and a building or structure non-conforming in some manner pursuant to Section 5.3.1, 
may. if involuntarily demolished, fully or partially, and not deemed abandoned, may be 
reconstructed or replaced, within the same portion of the lot, provided that the exterior 
dimensions of any vertical section do not exceed that of the original building or structure, 
provided that there is no increase in any nonconformity of the original use or building or 
structure and provided further that the reconstruction or replacement be substantially 
completed within three years with respect to buildings and structures for residential uses 
and two years with respect to buildings and structures for business use, of the date of the 
involuntary demolition or damage. 

Hand count taken. A 2/3 vote is required. Yes 153; No 92. Motion is defeated . 

Article 11; 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, 
and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statue, a sum or sums of money, with the 
intention that these funds be available in FY 2005 and, thereafter, to be expended by the 
Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Sewer Commissioners, for the purpose 
of conducting a feasibility study to identify and evaluate parcels of land within the Town 
of Cohasset. suitable for the siting of municipal communal and/or satellite wastewater 
treatment and disposal systems to service substandard and failing septic systems in the 
Aaron River/Lily Pond Watershed, which would allow for the sewering of these non- 
centralized areas which pose an environmental threat to the Town's drinking water supply 
or other water resource areas; and further that these funds also be expended to further 
evaluate and assess sewering needs within currently non-sewered areas of the Town to 
establish a basis for a Facility Plan (Comprehensive Wastewater Plan) Update which 
would designate and prioritize expansion areas of the North and Central Sewer Districts 



69 



subject to any future available capacity and/or to establish new sewer districts and to 
further develop an on-site loan program, originally authorized by Article 13 at the March 
29, 1997 Annual Town Meeting, for any areas not then designated or prioritized for 
sewer expansion, which would allow the environmentally sound resolution to existing 
pollution sources emanating from current wastewater disposal practices; that to fund this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow a sum or sums of money, under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7, of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town, therefore. 

MOVED that One Hundred Thousand ($100,000) Dollars be appropriated, with the 
intention that these funds be available in FY 2006 and, thereafter, to be expended by the 
Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Sewer Commissioners, for the purpose 
of conducting a feasibility study to identify and evaluate parcels of land within the Town 
of Cohasset, suitable for the siting of municipal communal and/or satellite wastewater 
treatment and disposal systems to service substandard and failing septic systems in the 
Aaron River/Lily Pond Watershed, which would allow for the sewering of these non- 
centralized areas which pose an environmental threat to the Town's drinking water supply 
or other water resource areas; and further that these funds also be expended to further 
evaluate and assess sewering needs within currently non-sewered areas of the Town to 
establish a basis for a Facility Plan (Comprehensive Wastewater Plan) Update which 
would designate and prioritize expansion areas of the North and Central Sewer Districts 
subject to any future available capacity and/or to establish new sewer districts; that to 
fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
hereby authorized to bortow One Hundred Thousand (5100,000) Dollars, under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, or 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town, therefore. 

Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Resolution offered by Donna McGee, Chairwoman of the Advisory Committee. 

BE IT RESOLVED THAT: 

WHEREAS,_Susan Kent has faithfully served the people of the Town of Cohasset as a 

member of the Advisory Committee for the past five years, one as chairman; and 

WHEREAS, as a member of the Advisory Committee, Susan Kent has been a 
thoughtful, committed member and leader; and 

WHEREAS, during her tenure as Chairman, Susan Kent began the process of more 
openness and access to Advisory Committee deliberations by initiating televised hearings 
and 

WHEREAS, over these five years, we have had the benefit of her leadership skills, 
unfailing good humor and wisdom, as well as a good amount of snack food; and 



70 



NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the citizens of Cohasset in Town Meeting 
assembled, on this second day of April 2005, to express our gratitude to Susan Kent and 
declare their deep appreciation of her outstanding service and dedication to our Town. 

Resolution adopted unanimously 

Article 12: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust, or otherwise borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute a sum or sums of money to be expended by the Town 
Manager with the approval of Board of Sewer Commissioners to implement the 
following wastewater project and the Town is herein authorized to acquire by purchase, 
gift, eminent domain, or otherwise, temporary and permanent Real Estate easements 
within private or common ways for the purpose of laying, constmcting, replacing, 
improving or otherwise maintaining sewer collection pipes, manholes and appurtenant 
equipment and structures all in connection with said project; a plan depicting the 
impacted ways is available at the Town Clerk's office and at the Paul Pratt Memorial 
Library: 

To authorize the Little Harbor/Atlantic Avenue Sewer Expansion Project, this system 
specifically intended to serve existing dwelling units, as defined by current zoning 
regulations in the Districts, such dwellings which existed as of the date of the vote of 
Article 8. of the 2002 Annual Town Meeting, as previously approved and defined; 
including the associated expansion of the Cohasset Wastewater Treatment Plant as set 
forth in the "Supplement to Final Wastewater Facility Plan and Environmental Impact 
Report,"' dated February 2005 prepared by Tutela Engineering Associates, Inc.. copies of 
which are available at the Town Clerk's office and at the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, to 
approve said "Supplement" and further that the Treasurer of the Town, with the approval 
of the Board of Selectmen borrow a sum of money to fund the design, permitting, 
bidding, construction and installation of said project which borrowing is to be repaid by 
betterments assessed upon the properties benefited thereby, provided however a sum of 
money pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7. of the Massachusetts General Laws, as 
amended, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town. 

MOVED that Twelve Million ($12,000,000) Dollars be appropriated and expended by the 
Town Manager with the approval of Board of Sewer Commissioners to implement the 
following wastewater project, including without limitation all costs thereof as defined in 
Section 1 of Chapter 29C of the General Laws, as most recently amended by St. 1998, c.78: 
the Little Harbor/Atlantic Avenue Sewer Expansion Project, this system specifically 
intended to serve existing dwelling units, as defined by current zoning regulations in the 
Districts, such dwellings which existed as of the date of the vote of Article 8, of the 2002 
Annual Town Meeting, as previously approved and defined; including the associated 
expansion of the Cohasset Wastewater Treatment Plant as set forth in the "Supplement to 
Final Wastewater Facility Plan and Environmental Impact Report," dated Febaiary 2005 
prepared by Tutela Engineering Associates, Inc., copies of which are available at the 



71 



Town Clerk's office and at the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, and to approve said 
"Supplement; and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow Twelve Million ($12,000,000) Dollars and to issue bonds 
or notes therefore under Chapter 44 of the General Laws and/or Chapter 29C of the General 
Laws, as most recently amended by St. 1998, c.78; that such bonds or notes shall be general 
obligations of the Town with the intent that the principal and interest payments for this 
borrowing is to be repaid by betterments assessed upon properties benefited thereby; that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow all or a portion of such 
amount from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust established pursuant to 
Chapter 29C, as most recently amended by St. 1998, c.78; and in connection therewith to 
enter into a loan agreement and/or security agreement with the Trust and otherwise to 
contract with the Trust and the Department of Environmental Protection widi respect to such 
loan and for any federal or state aid available for the project or for the financing thereof; and 
that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to enter into a project regulatory agreement with 
the Department of Environmental Protection, to expend all funds available for the project 
and to take any other action necessary to carry out the project. 

Motion adopted by the required 2/3's^ 

Article 13: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust, or otherwise borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute a sum or sums of money to be expended by the Town 
Manager with the approval of the Board of Sewer Commissioners to engineer, design, 
construct and/or otherwise implement the following wastewater project and the Town is 
herein authorized to acquire by purchase, gift, eminent domain, or otherwise, temporary 
and permanent Real Estate easements within private or common ways for the purpose of 
laying, constructing, replacing, improving or otherwise maintaining sewer collection 
pipes, manholes and appurtenant equipment and structures all in connection with said 
project; a plan depicting the impacted ways is available at the Town Clerk's office and at 
the Paul Pratt Memorial Library: 

To authorize the expansion of the North Cohasset Sewer District by extending low 
pressure sewers to service existing homes along portions of Jerusalem Road, Deep Run 
and Rust Way in accordance with the priority intents outlined in the Approved May 1997 
"Final Facility Plan and Environmental Impact Report (EOEA #10275), and further 
defined in the "Supplement to Final Wastewater Facility Plan and Environmental Impact 
Report," dated February 2005, prepared by Tutela Engineering Associates, Inc., and 
therein referenced as the "Jerusalem Road Sewer District" a listing of which is available 
at the Town Clerk's office and at the Paul Pratt Memorial Library and thereby to allow 
existing homeowners in these areas to connect to the North Cohasset Sewer District, all 
in accordance with the Town's Intermunicipal Agreement with the Town of Hull, which 
borrowing is to be repaid by betterments assessed upon the properties benefited thereby. 



72 



MOVED that One Million Two Hundred Thousand (51,200,000) Dollars be appropriated 
and expended by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Sewer 
Commissioners to engineer, design, construct and/or otherwise implement the following 
wastewater project, including without limitation all costs thereof as defined in Section 1 of 
Chapter 29C of the General Laws, as most recently amended by St. 1998, c.78: to authorize 
the expansion of the North Cohasset Sewer District by extending low pressure sewers to 
service existing homes along portions of Jerusalem Road, Deep Run and Rust Way in 
accordance with the priority intents outlined in the Approved May 1997 "Final Facility 
Plan and Environmental Impact Report (EOEA #10275), and further defined in the 
"Supplement to Final Wastewater Facility Plan and Environmental Impact Report," dated 
February 2005, prepared by Tutela Engineering Associates, Inc., and therein referenced 
as the "Jerusalem Road Sewer District" a listing of which is available at the Town 
Clerk's office and at the Paul Pratt Memorial Library; and thereby to allow existing 
homeowners in these areas to connect to the North Cohasset Sewer District, all in 
accordance with the Town's Intermunicipal Agreement with the Town of Hull; that to 
meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to 
borrow One Million Two Hundred Thousand (SI ,200,000) Dollars and to issue bonds or 
notes therefore under Chapter 44 of the General Laws and/or Chapter 29C of the General 
Laws, as most recently amended by St. 1998, c.78; that such bonds or notes shall be general 
obligations of the Town with the intent that the principal and interest payments for this 
borrowing is to be repaid by betterments assessed upon properties benefited thereby that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow all or a portion of such 
amount from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust established pursuant to 
Chapter 29C, as most recently amended by St. 1998, c.78; and in connection therewith to 
enter into a loan agreement and/or security agreement with the Trust and otherwise to 
contract with the Trust and the Department of Environmental Protection with respect to such 
loan and for any federal or stale aid available for the project or for the financing thereof; and 
that the Board of Selectmen is authorized to enter into a project regulatory agreement with 
the Department of Environmental Protection, to expend all funds available for the project 
and to take any other action necessary to carry out the project. 

Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 14 : 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust, or otherwise borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute a sum or sums of money equal to one half of the 
principal and interest applicable to the borrowing required by Article 12 and Article 13 to 
be appropriated from the tax levy and other general revenues of the Town contingent 
upon a vote of the Town to exempt such one half allocation of costs from the limitation 
on taxes contained in Proposition 2 Vi by means of a debt exclusion override. 

MOVED that the Treasurer of the Town with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is 
hereby authorized to borrow from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust, or 
otherwise borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum or sums of money equal to one 



73 



half of the principal and interest applicable to the borrowing required by Article 12 and 
Article 13. to be repaid from the tax levy and other general revenues of the Town, 
contingent upon a vote of the Town to exempt such one half allocation of costs for such 
principal and interests from the limitation on taxes contained in Proposition 2 Vi by 
means of a debt exclusion override pursuant to Chapter 59, Section 21(k) in which event 
the amount of betterment proposed shall be reduced accordingly by the motion for 
Articles 12 and 13. 

Hand count taken - Yes 162; No 32. Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 

Article 15 : 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow from the Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust or otherwise borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statue, the sum of Three Million Dollars ($3,000,000) to be 
used by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Health to implement the 
Town's Comprehensive On-Site Wastewater Management Plan which plan was adopted 
by the Board of Health on September 13, 2004 and is on file at the office of the Town 
Clerk, as the same may be from time to time amended. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 16: 



To see if the town will vote to amend Article VI "Municipal Finance of the General 
Bylaws of the Town by adding a new Section 7 as follows: 

The town Director of Finance and the School Committee will present to the Selectmen on 
a monthly basis an accurate monthly expense status report of the line items in their 
budget. This report shall indicate MTD, QTD and YTD figures. 

This information shall be available to the public at the Paul Pratt Library and the Town 
Clerk's office and shall be updated on a monthly basis. 



CITIZENS' PETITION 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Leonora Jenkins 
James Watson 
Olive Mullen 
Norma Grassey 
Karen Quigley 



198 Jerusalem Road 
101 Border Street 
337 S. Main Street 
20 Ledge Way 



Leland Jenkins 
James Mullen 
Ernest Grassey 
Richard Barrow 



27 Clay Spring Road Gabriel Gomez 



198 Jerusalem Road 
337 South Main St. 
20 Ledge Way 
283 King Street 
59 Highland Avenue 



74 



MOVED that the General Bylaws of the Town of Cohasset, Article VI, "Municipal 
Finance of the General Bylaws of the Town" be hereby amended by adding a new section 
7 as follows: 

Section 7. The Town Director of Finance shall present to the Board of Selectmen on a 
monthly basis an accurate monthly expense status report of the line items in all town 
budgets, including month to date, and year to date figures to track the rate of 
expenditures, together with any encumbrances for which the town is obligated to pay in 
the future. The Cohasset School Committee shall cause to be prepared on a monthly basis 
an accurate monthly expense status report of the expenditure items in the school budget, 
except as may be otherwise be required by law, including month to date, and year to date 
figures to track the rate of expenditures, together with any encumbrances for which the 
town is obligated to pay in the future and shall provide a copy thereof to the Director of 
Finance of the Town. Copies shall be made available to the public at the Town Clerk's 
office and the Paul Pratt Memorial Library. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 17: 

To see if the town will vote to amend Article VI "Municipal Finance" of the General 
Bylaws of the Town by adding a new Section 8 as follows: 

All revolving and enterprise funds in all town and school departments shall comply with 
all MGLs. A detailed income and expense report with MTD, QTD, and YTD totals shall 
be presented to the Selectmen on a monthly basis. All costs relating to fee for services 
including: salaries, benefits, any and all insurance not limited to worker's compensation 
and liability, utilities, maintenance, repairs, cleaning, equipment updates, supplies, rent of 
space and all other applicable charges shall be reflected in expense totals. 

This monthly information shall be available to the public at the Paul Pratt Library and the 
Town Clerk's office and a yearly report shall be included in the Annual Town report. 

CITIZENS' PETITION 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Leonora Jenkins 
James Watson 
Olive Mullen 
Norma Grassey 
Karen Quigley 



198 Jerusalem Road 
10 1 Border Street 
337 S. Main Street 
20 Ledge Way 
27 Clay Spring Rd. 



Leland Jenkins 
James Mullen 
Ernest Grassey 
Richard Barrow 
Gabriel Gomez 



198 Jerusalem Road 
337 S. Main Street 
20 Ledge Way 
283 King Street 
59 Highland Avenue 



MOVED that the General Bylaws of the Town of Cohasset be hereby amended to by 
addina a new Section 8 as follows: 



75 



Section 8: The Town Director of Finance shall present to the Board of Selectmen on a 
monthly basis an accurate monthly income and_expense status report of the expenditures, 
direct and indirect in all town revolving and enterprise accounts, including month to date, 
and year to date figures to track the rate of expenditures. The Cohasset School Committee 
shall cause to be prepared, on a monthly basis an accurate monthly income and expense 
status report of the expenditures, direct and indirect in all school revolving and enterprise 
accounts, including month to date, and year to date figures to track the rate of 
expenditures, except as may otherwise be required by law, with a copy to the town's 
Director of Finance. Copies shall be made available to the public at the Town Clerk's 
office and the Paul Pratt Memorial Library. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 18: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the current schedule of water rates by adopting the 
following new schedule of Rate #1, Metered Residential and Non Residential water rates, 
to take effect April 15, 2005: 

Rate #1 (Metered Residential and Non Residential) 

Size of Meter Charge per quarter plus charge per 100 cf per quarter 

no multiplier l" Step 2"'' Step 

0-2,000 cf Over 2,000cf/quarter 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

S4.48 $7.38 

and further to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available 
funds, and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money, and to 
transfer a sum or sums from Article 17 of the March 27, 2004 Annual Town Meeting and 
from Article 13 of the December 6, 2004 Special Town Meeting, for the Water 
Commission to complete various water system improvement projects including, but not 
limited to, improvements to lower the levels of Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and 
other disinfection byproducts in tap water, improvements to the Lily Pond Water 
Treatment Plant, cleaning water pipes, cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water 
pipes, capital maintenance, and other improvements to wells, storage tanks, the water 
distribution system, and other water department facilities, and measures to protect the 
sources of public drinking water supply and further to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent 



76 



5/8'* 


$ 36.74 


3/4" 


$ 36.74 


1" 


$ 86.16 


1 1/2" 


$ 168.51 


2" 


$ 267.34 


3" 


$ 529.61 


4" 


$ 779.21 


6" 


$1,647.10 



domain all or part of the parcel of land as found on Assessors map 65; Parcel 020 
(described by deed recorded in Norfolk County Registry of Deeds Book 2115 Page 412) 
for watershed, open space and recreation purposes; and that to provide said funding the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow a 
sum of money and to issue bonds and notes of the Town, therefore, such borrow ing to be 
general obligations of the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid from 
Water Department Revenues; and further that this article is intended to take effect upon 
passage in Fiscal Year 2005. 

MOVED that the Town vote to amend the current schedule of water rates by adopting 
the following new schedule of Rate #1, Metered Residential and Non Residential water 
rales, to take effect April 15, 2005: 

Rate #1 (Metered Residential and Non Residential) 

Size of Meter Charge per quarter plus charge per 100 cf per quarter 

no multiplier 1^' Step 2"^* Step 

0-2,000 cf Over 2,000cf/quarter 

S4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

54.48 $7.38 

$4.48 $7.38 

$4.48 S7.38 

Motion adopted. 

And it is further MOVTD that Four Million Ninety Six Thousand Thirty Two 
($4,096,032) Dollars be hereby appropriated for the Water Commission to complete 
various water system improvement projects including, but not limited to, improvements 
to lower the levels of Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and other disinfection byproducts 
in tap water, improvements to the Lily Pond Water Treatment Plant, cleaning water pipes, 
cleaning and lining water pipes, replacing water pipes, capital maintenance, and other 
improvements to wells, storage tanks, the water distribution system, and other water 
department facilities, and measures to protect the sources of public drinking water supply 
and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners 
to acquire by purchase, gift, or eminent domain all or part of the parcel of land as found 
on Assessors map 65; Parcel 020 (described by deed recorded in Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds Book 2115 Page 412) for watershed, open space and recreation 
purposes; and that to provide said funding to transfer the sum of $96,032 from Article 13 
of the December 6, 2004 Special Town Meeting, and that the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow $4,000,000 and to 
issue bonds and notes of the Town, therefore, such borrowing to be general obligations of 
the Town with the intent that such bonds shall be repaid from Water Department 



77 



5/8" 


S 36.74 


3/4" 


$ 36.74 


1" 


$ 86.16 


1 1/2" 


$ 168.51 


2" 


$ 267.34 


3" 


$ 529.61 


4" 


S 779.21 


6" 


$1,647.10 



Revenues; and further that this article is intended to take effect upon passage in Fiscal 
Year 2005. 

Motion adopted by the required 2/3's. 



Article 19: Assessors Compensation 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provision of Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 59, Section 21 A. which statute provides as follows: 

Section 21 A hi any city or town which accepts this section, an assessor or assistant 
assessor who has completed the necessary courses of study and training and has been 
awarded a certificate by the hitemational Association of Assessing Officers as a certified 
assessment evaluator or who has been awarded a certificate by the Association of 
Massachusetts Assessors as a certified Massachusetts assessor shall receive as 
compensation from such city or town, in addition to the regular compensation paid by 
such city or town for services in such office, an amount equal to ten per cent of such 
regular compensation; provided, however, that in no event shall such additional 
compensation exceed one thousand dollars annually, if such assessor or assistant assessor 
is employed on a full-time basis, or five hundred dollars, if such assessor or assistant 
assessor is employed on a part-time basis. An assessor who has been awarded both 
certificates referred to above shall receive such additional compensation for only one of 
such certificates. In order to qualify for such additional compensation, an assessor or 
assistant assessor shall submit proof that he has been awarded either or both of the 
aforesaid certificates to the mayor or the board of selectmen of such city or town. The 
additional compensation herein provided shall be prorated for any twelve month period in 
which an eligible person does not hold the office of assessor or assistant assessor for 
twelve consecutive months. 

and further, in order to meet the obligations of said Section 21 A, to see if the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide the sum 
of $2,000 for the two qualifying employees, to be added to the amounts voted under 
Board of Assessors Personnel Services and Town Manager Personal Services Clerical 
under Article 3 of this Town Meeting. 

MOVED that Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 21 A be accepted by the 
Town of Cohasset, and further the sum of Two Thousand ($2,000) be raised and 
appropriated from the Fiscal 2006 tax levy and other general revenues of the town in 
order to meet the obligations of said Section 21A for the two qualifying employees, to be 
added to the amounts voted under Board of Assessors Personnel Services and Town 
Manager Personal Services Clerical under Article 3 of this Town Meeting. 

Motion adopted. 



78 



Article 20 : 

To see if the Town will vote to establish a committee of nine residents, to be appointed 
by the Board of Selectmen, to investigate alternative sources of energy that may be used 
by the Town and make report to the Annual Town Meeting of 2006. 

MOVED that an Alternate Energy Sources Committee, consisting of nine residents, be 
hereby established, to be appointed by a committee consisting of the Moderator, the 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and the Chairman of the Advisory Committee, to 
investigate alternative sources of energy that may be used by the Town, with the intention 
that the Committee would make a report to the Annual Town Meeting of 2006. 

Motion adopted unanimously. 

Article 21: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 2, Article XIV of the Wetlands Protection 
Bylaw by replacing the words "within twenty-five feet of a vernal pool" with the words 
"within one hundred feet of a vernal pool". 

MOVED that Section 2, Article XIV of the Wetlands Protection Bylaw be hereby 
amended by deleting the words "within twenty-five feet of a vernal pool" and substituting 
therefore the words "within one hundred feet of a vernal pool". 

Motion adopted. 

It was moved and seconded at 6:50 p.m. that this meeting stands adjourned to Saturday, 
April 9, 2005 for the election of town offices. 

A True Record, ATTEST: 

Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



79 



ANNUAL TO^\^V ELECTION - TOWN OF COHASSET 



APRIL 9, 2005 



The polls opened at 8 a.m. and closed at 6 p.m. 



Total Voters — 2244 Per Cent - 44. 



Absentee Voters - Pre. 1-104 ;Pre. 2 - 66. 



Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion Douglas at 7:45 a.m. were as 



follows: 



Carol St. Pierre 
Kathleen Rhodes 
Debra Krupczak 
Katherine Lincoln 
Jean Thompson 
Grace Tuckerman 



Janice Rosano 
Jody Doyle 
Helen King 
Louise Flint 
Margaret Heman 
Nancy Barrett 



Selectmen for Three Years (2) 

Frederick R. Koed 
Deborah A. Shadd 
Raimund G. Vanderweil, Jr. 
Write- ins/S cattering 
Blanks 
Total 



Pre. 1 

730 
636 
757 
5 
330 
2458 



Pre. 2 

696 
479 
522 
8 
325 
2030 



Total 

1426 
1115 
1279 
13 
655 
4488 



Moderator for Three Years (1) 



Daniel S. Evans 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 



929 


716 


1645 


7 


9 


16 


293 


290 


583 



1229 



1015 



2244 



Town Clerk for Three Years (1) 



Marion L. Douglas 
Write- ins/S cattering 
Blanks 
Total 



923 


766 


1689 


5 





5 


301 


249 


550 



1229 



1015 



2244 



80 



School Committee for Three Years (1) 



Alfred Slanetz 


732 


567 


1299 


Write-ins/Scattering 


12 


6 


18 


Blanks 


485 


442 


927 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


School Committee for One Year to fill 


an unexpired term (1) 






Pre. 1 


Pre. 2 


Total 


Leonora C. Jenkins 


544 


484 


1028 


Pamela F. Wilson 


605 


456 


1061 


Write-ins/Scattering 


2 





2 


Blanks 


78 


75 


153 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


Trustees Paul Pratt Memorial Library 


for Three Years 


(3) 




Sheila S. Evans 


883 


682 


1565 


Roger L. Lowe 


842 


653 


1495 


Rodney M. Hobson 


862 


666 


1528 


Write-ins/Scattering 


4 





4 


Blanks 


1096 


1044 


2140 


Total 


3687 


3045 


6732 


Assessor for Three Years (1) 








Mary E Granville 


826 


634 


1460 


Write-ins/Scattering 


2 


2 


4 


Blanks 


401 


379 


780 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


Board of Health for Three Years (1) 








Robin M. Lawrence 


893 


690 


1583 


Write-ins/Scattering 


4 


1 


5 


Blanks 


332 


324 


656 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 



81 



Cohasset Housing Authority for Five Years (1) 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



Christopher M. Allen 


843 


659 


1502 


Write-ins/scattering 


3 





3 


Blanks 








Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


Planning Board for Five Years (1) 








Stuart W. Ivimey 


827 


647 


1474 


Write-ins/scattering 


3 


3 


6 


Blanks 


399 


365 


764 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


Recreation Commission for Five Years (1) 


88 


83 




Write-ins/scattering 


171 


James E. Carroll, Jr. 


^55 


76 


131 


Blanks 


1086 


856 


1942 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


Sewer Commission for Three Years (1) 










Pre. 1 


Pre. 2 


Total 


Raymond Kasperowicz 


862 


689 


1551 


Write-ins/Scattering 


8 


3 


11 


Blanks 


359 


323 


682 


Total 


1229 


1015 


2244 


Water Commission for Three Years (1) 









903 


779 


1682 


8 


4 


12 


318 


232 


500 



Glenn A. Pratt 

Write-ins/Scattering 

Blanks 

Total 1229 1015 2244 



The polls closed at 6 p.m. and the results were declared at 7 p.m. 
A True Record, ATTEST: 



82 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION - MAY 21, 2005 

The polls opened at 8 a.m. and closed at 6 p.m. Due to a scheduling conflict, the polling 
location was changed to the Second Congregational Church, 43 Highland Ave. instead of 
the usual polling location at the Town Hall Auditorium, 41 Highland Ave. 

Total Voters — 197 Percent - 38 Absentee Voters - Pre. 1-81; Pre. 2 - 76. 

Election officers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion Douglas at 7:45 a.m. were as 
follows: 

Carol St. Pierre Janice Rosano 

Kathleen Rhodes Jody Doyle 

Debra Krupczak Helen King 

Kalherine Lincoln Abigail Alves 

Jean Thompson Margaret Heman 

Grace Tuckerman Nancy Barrett 

Question 1: General Operating Override Pursuant to G.L. Chapter 59, section 21C 

Shall the Tow n of Cohasset be allowed to assess an additional $400,000 in real and 
personal property taxes for the purpose of meeting the operational expenses of the Town 
Government and School System for the fiscal year beginning July 1, Two Thousand 
Five? 

Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
Total 



Question 2: Debt Exclusion Override Pursuant to G.L. Chapter 59, section 21C (k) 

Shall the Town of Cohasset be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and 
one-half, so called, one-half of the amounts required to pay the principal of and interest on the 
bonds to be issued in order to fund the Little Harbor/Atlantic Avenue Sewer Expansion Project 
and the North Cohasset Sewer District Expansion Project authorized at the 2005 Annual Town 
Meeting? 



514 


380 


894 


499 


579 


1078 


3 


i 


4 


1016 


960 


1976 



83 



570 


267 


837 


432 


685 


1117 


14 
1016 


8 
960 


22 
1976 



Pre. 1 Pre. 2 Total 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
Total 

The polls closed at 6 p.m. and the results were declared at 6:20 p.m. 

A True Record, ATTEST: 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



84 



Index Special Town Meeting - December 5, 2005 



Article # Description of Article 

1 Balance FY'06 Operating Budget. Adopted 

2 Unpaid bills. Indefinitely Postponed. 

3 Police Contract. Adopted. 

4 Community Preservation Committee 

a. Retain a housing consultant to establish a Housing Partnership on 
affordable housing. Adopted. 

b. Rescind Vote under Article 12(c) of the March 27, 2004 Annual 
Town Meeting for drainage at Alumni Field and restore funds to 
Community Preservation Fund. Adopted 

5 Triennial Revaluation program by the Board of Assessors. Adopted 

6 Property tax exemptions. Adopted. 

7 Water Commissioners acquire parcels of land in Scituate for protection of 
watershed. Adopted. 

8 Water Commissioners acquire parcels of land for watershed protection. 
Adopted. 

9 Additional powers for the Cohasset Board of Library Trustees. Adopted. 

10 Equipment supplies for emergency preparedness. Adopted. 

1 1 Amend zoning bylaws in conjunction with the Site Plan process. - 
Indefinitely postponed. 

12 Amend zoning bylaws Section 5.3.1- District DB. Indefinitely postponed. 

13 Amend zoning bylaws Section 7.2 to authorize parking which does not 
comply with requirements. Indefinitely postponed. 

14 Conservation restriction on Assessor Map 42, Lot 041 to preserve the 
drinking water. Adopted. 

15 Scholarship. Indefinitely postponed. 

16 Reconstruct a portion of sidewalk on Beechwood St. from So. Main St to 
easterly intersection of Norman Todd Road. Adopted. 

17 Cook Estate project. Indefinitely postponed. 



85 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 2005 

At the Special Town Meeting held on Monday, December 5, 2005 at the Cohasset High 
School Sullivan Gymnasium the following articles were contained in the warrant and 
acted upon as follows. 

Checkers sworn in by the Town Clerk, Marion L. Douglas at 6:30 p.m. were Carol St. 
Pierre, Geraldine Ainslie, Margaret Heman, Kathleen Rhodes and Debra Krupczak. 
Tellers were appointed and sworn in by the Moderator, Daniel Evans. 

The Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:25 p.m. and a quorum of 100 was present 
at that time. The registered voters checked in on the voting list totaled for Precinct 1 - 
123; and Precinct 2 - 123 for a total of 246 voters. 

It was voted unanimously to dispense with the reading of the call of the Meeting and 
Return of Service having been examined by the Moderator and found to be in order. 

Article 1 

To see what additional action the Town will vote to amend, modify, increase or decrease, 
or otherwise, to balance the Fiscal Year 2006 Operating Budget as voted in Article 3 of 
the April 2, 2005 Annual Town Meeting, including proposed revised appropriations set 
forth below and any additional sums the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from 
available funds or otherwise, for the payment of the salaries and compensation, expenses, 
equipment, and outlays, capital and otherwise, of the several Town departments, for the 
current fiscal year, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Original Proposed Revised Increase/ 

Appropriation Account Appropriation Appropriation Decrease 

Town Manager 

Town Hall Clerical $422,148 S399,148 ($23,000) 

Treasurer/Collector 

Personal Services $65,002 $60,002 ($5,000) 

Cohasset Public Schools 

Salaries & Expenses $12,629,382 $12,344,382 ($285,000) 

Building Maintenance 

Payroll & Expenses $456,056 $446,056 ($10,000) 



86 



Pensions 
Norfolk County 



$1,003,173 



$983,173 



($20,000) 



Worker's Compensation 
General Expenses 



$90,000 



Property & Liability Insurance 
General Expenses $222,500 



Unemployment 
General Expenses 

Reser\e Fund 



55,000 
$125,000 



$70,000 

$202,500 

$35,000 
$234,000 



($20,000) 

($20,000) 

$30,000 
$109,000 



MOVED that the amounts appropriated pursuant to Article 3 of the April 2, 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting be reduced by the amount of $383,000 as a result of the decreases listed 
below. 



Appropriation Account 


Original 
Appropriation 


Proposed Revised 
Appropriation 


Increase/ 
Decrease 


Town Manager 
Town Hall Clerical 


$422,148 


$399,148 


($23,000) 


Treasurer/Collector 
Personal Services 


$65,002 


$60,002 


($5,000) 


Cohasset Public Schools 
Salaries & Expenses 


$12,629,382 


$12,344,382 


($285,000) 


Building Maintenance 
Payroll & Expenses 


$456,056 


$446,056 


($10,000) 


Pensions 
Norfolk County 


$1,003,173 


$983,173 


($20,000) 


Worker's Compensation 
General Expenses 


$90,000 


$70,000 


($20,000) 


Property & Liability Insurance 
General Expenses $222,500 


$202,500 


($20,000) 



87 



And further that One Hundred Thirty Nine Thousand Dollars ($139,000) be hereby 
appropriated to add to and increase the amounts voted pursuant to Article 3 of the April 
2, 2005 Annual Town Meeting as adjusted as set forth below, and to fund such 
appropriation the amount of One Hundred Nine Thousand Dollars ($109,000) be 
transferred from Free Cash and the sum of Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000) be raised 
from taxation and other general revenues of the Town. 



Appropriation Account 

Unemployment 
General Expenses 

Reserve Fund 

Amendment offered by Lenora Jenkins. 

MOVED that the amounts appropriated pursuant to Article 3 of the April 2, 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting be reduced by the amount of $464,652 as a result of the decreases listed 
below. 



Original 


Proposed Revised 


Increase/ 


Appropriation 


Appropriation 


Decrease 


$5,000 


$35,000 


$30,000 


$125,000 


$234,000 


$109,000 



Appropriation Account 


Original 
Appropriation 


Proposed Revised 
Appropriation 


Increase/ 
Decrease 


Town Manager 
Town Hall Clerical 


$422,148 


$399,148 


($23,000) 


Treasurer/Collector 
Personal Services 


$65,002 


$60,002 


($5,000) 


Cohasset Public Schools 
Salaries & Expenses 


$12,629,382 


$12,262,730 


($366,652) 


Building Maintenance 
Payroll & Expenses 


$456,056 


$446,056 


($10,000) 


Pensions 
Norfolk County 


$1,003,173 


$983,173 


($20,000) 


Worker's Compensation 
General Expenses 


$90,000 


$70,000 


($20,000) 



Property & Liability Insurance 

General Expenses $222,500 $202,500 ($20,000) 



88 



And further that One Hundred Thirty Nine Thousand Dollars ($220,652) be hereby 
appropriated to add to and increase the amounts voted pursuant to Article 3 of the April 
2, 2005 Annual Town Meeting as adjusted as set forth below, and to fund such 
appropriation the amount of One Hundred Nine Thousand Dollars ($109,000) be 
transferred from Free Cash and the sum of Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000) be raised 
from taxation and other general revenues of the Town. 

Original Proposed Revised hicrease/ 

Appropriation Account Appropriation Appropriation Decrease 

Unemployment 

General Expenses $5,000 $35,000 $30,000 

Reserve Fund $125,000 $315,652 $190,652 

Amendment defeated. 
Main motion adopted. 

Article 2 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, 
and/or borrow, pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum of money to be expended by the 
Town Manager to pay for unpaid bills from previous fiscal years, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 3 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from available funds, 
a sum or sums of money, to be expended by the Town Manager, to fund the FY05 and 
FY06 cost items of a collective bargaining agreement between the Town, represented by 
the Board of Selectmen, and the Police Department employees represented by Local 641, 
International Brotherhood of Police Officers, in accordance with Chapter 150E of the 
General laws, or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOVED that the sum of Twenty Thousand Seven Hundred Fifteen Dollars ($20,715) be 
transferred from Free Cash to be expended by the Town Manager to fund the Fiscal Year 
2005 cost items of a Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Town, represented by 
the Board of Selectmen, and the Police Department employees represented by Local 641, 
International Brotherhood of Police Officers; and further that the sum of Sixty Four 
Thousand Nine Hundred Eighteen Dollars ($64,918) be raised from the fiscal Year 2006 
tax levy and other general revenues of the Town to fund the Fiscal Year 2006 cost items 
of a Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Town, represented by the Board of 



89 



Selectmen, and the Police Department employees represented by Lx)cal 641, 
International Brotherhood of Police Officers. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 4 

To see what action the Town will take with respect to the recommendations of the 
Community Preservation Committee for Fiscal Year 2006, and to see if the Town will 
vote to implement any such recommendation by appropriating a sum or sums of money 
from the Community Preservation Fund established pursuant to Chapter 44B of the 
General Laws, and from any other source, by raising and appropriating, borrowing 
pursuant to any applicable statute or borrowing pursuant to any applicable statute for this 
purpose, and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift or 
eminent domain, or alternatively to convey, sell or dispose of, such real property interests 
as may be required by the Community Preservation Act to implement any such 
expenditure of community preservation funds, or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOVED that the Town adopt and approve the recommendations of the Community 
Preservation Committee for Fiscal 2006 as follows: 

Recommendation A: 

MOVED that Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000.00) be transferred from the 
Community Preservation Fund - Discretionary Sub-Account, with the intention that these 
funds be available in FY 2006 and thereafter to be expended by the Town Manager, for 
retaining an affordable housing consultant who will help the Cohasset Board of 
Selectmen with the establishment of a Housing Partnership, the training of its members, 
as well as education and outreach to Town officials and citizens on the topic of affordable 
housing. The sum of Ten Thousand Dollars from this appropriation shall be dedicated to 
the completion of the Town's Affordable Housing Plan, provided however if the 
Affordable Housing Plan is completed for less than that sum, the balance of the $10,000 
may be expended for other activities relating to the Housing Partnership Committee. 

Motion adopted. 

Recommendation B: 

MOVED that the Town rescind its vote under Article 12 (C) of the March 27, 2004 
Annual Town Meeting in which it transferred the sum of $98,500 from the Community 
Preservation Fund - Discretionary Sub-Account for improvements, including but not 
limited to, the installation of drainage structures, to Alumni Field at the Cohasset Middle 
High School Complex on Pond Street, so that the $98,500 is restored to the Community 
Preservation Fund - Discretionary Sub-Account. 

Motion adopted. 



90 



Article 5 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, 
and/or borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, the sum of Fifteen thousand dollars 
($15,000) to be expended by the Board of Assessors for the ongoing Triennial 
Revaluation Program for certification by the Department of Revenue, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

MOVED that the sum of Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) be transferred from the 
Overlay Surplus Account to be expended by the Town Manager, with the approval of the 
Board of Assessors, for the ongoing Triennial Revaluation Program for certification by 
the Department of Revenue. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 6 

To see if the town will vote to accept Section 4 of Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 to grant 
an additional real estate tax exemption of not more than one hundred percent (100%). 
Such additional exemption may be granted to persons who qualify for property tax 
exemptions under clauses 17, 17C Vi, 17D. 22, 22A, 228, 22C, 22D, 22E, 37, 37A, 41, 
41 B. 41C, 42 and 43 of Section 5 of Chapter 59 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

MOVED that Section 4 of Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 be accepted by the Town to 
grant and additional real estate tax exemption of not more than one hundred percent 
(100%). Such additional exemption may be granted to persons who qualify for property 
tax exemptions under clauses 17, 17C '/a, HD, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 22D, 22E, 37, 37A, 
41 , 4 1 B, 4 1 C, 42 and 43 of Section 5 of Chapter 59 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 7 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to purchase, 
acquire or contribute to the acquisition of the fee title or a lesser title interest in certain 
parcels of land located in Scituate, and more particularly described below, for watershed 
protection purposes of the Aaron River Reservoir used in the Town of Cohasset as a 
public drinking water supply, pursuant to authority under G.L. c. 39 B, c. 40, c. 45 and 
Chapter 11 63 of the Acts and Resolves of 1973 or any other applicable statute; to obtain 
any and all necessary approvals, if any, including those of the Department of 
Environmental Protection for such acquisition; to authorize the Board of Water 
Commissioners to hold or convey a watershed preservation restriction as described in 
G.L. c. 184, §31 on those acquired parcels; 



91 



The parcels are described as: Scituate Tax Assessor's Map 017-002, Parcels 019 and 
020D more particularly described in a deed recorded in the Plymouth County Registry of 
Deeds at Book 14879, Page 256 and Scituate Tax Assessor's Map 017-002, Parcels 010 
and 005A more particularly described in a deed recorded in the Plymouth County 
Registry of Deeds at Book 17943, Page 46. 

MOVED that the Board of Water Commissioners, with the approval of the Town 
Manager be authorized to purchase, acquire or contribute to the acquisition of the fee title 
or a lesser title interest in certain parcels of land located in Scituate, and more particularly 
described below, for watershed protection purposes of the Aaron River Reservoir used in 
the Town of Cohasset as a public drinking water supply, pursuant to authority under G.L. 
c. 39 B, c. 40, c. 45 and Chapter 1163 of the Acts and Resolves of 1973 or any other 
applicable statute; to obtain any and all necessary approvals, if any, including those of the 
Department of Environmental Protection for such acquisition; to authorize the Board of 
Water Commissioners to hold or convey a watershed preservation restriction as described 
in G.L. c. 184, §31 on those acquired parcels; provided however that the funds used to 
purchase, acquire or contribute to the acquisition of such interests shall not exceed Two 
Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars ($250,000) from appropriations previously voted by the 
Town for Water Commission expenditures pursuant to Article 12 of the 2005 Annual 
Town Meeting, Article 18 of the 2004 Annual Town Meeting, and Article 13 of the Dec. 
6, 2004 Special Town Meeting. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted. 

Article 8 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water Commissioners to acquire 
by purchase, gift or Eminent Domain the fee title or a lesser title interest in any or all of 
certain parcels of land as follows: Parcels 52-6 (Book 6741. Page 272), 52-7 (Book 6350, 
Page 279), 41-27 (Book 7136, Page 382), 41-79 (Book 6738, Page 241), 41-118 (Book 
7136, Page 382), 41-119 (Book 7136. Page 382), 42-23 (Book 4044, Page 242), 66-1, 66- 
13 (Book 5042, Page 447). 66-14 (Book 2037, Page 45). 67-1, 72-1 (Book 10470, Page 
210), 72-2 (Book 10470, 210), and 55-51 (Book 10878, Page 417), 56-11 (Book 6525, 
page 670) for watershed protection purposes, or take any other action related thereof. 

MOVED that the Board of Water Commissioners, with the approval of the Town 
Manager be authorized to acquire by purchase, gift or Eminent Domain the fee title or a 
lesser title interest in any or all of certain parcels of land as follows: 



92 



Cohasset Assessors Map Book and Page 

52-6 Book 6741, Page 272 

52-7 Book 6350, Page 279 

41-27 Book 7136, Page 382 

41-79 Book 6738, Page 241 

41-118 Book 7136, Page 382 

41-119 Book 7136, Page 382 

42-23 Book 4044, Page 242 

66-1 

66-13 Book 5042, Page 447 

66-14 Book 2037, Page 45 

67-1 

55-51 Book 10878, Page 417 

56-11 Book 6525, page 670 

for watershed protection purposes; provided however that the funds used to pay for such 
acquisition shall not exceed Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000) from the 
appropriations previously voted by the Town for Water Commission expenditures 
pursuant to Article 12 of the 2005 Annual Town Meeting, Article 18 of the 2004 Annual 
Town Meeting and Article 13 of the December 6, 2004 Special Town Meeting. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted. 



Article 9 

To see if the town will vote to petition the General Court for enactment of a special law 
for benefit of the Town of Cohasset as is set forth as follows, and to authorize the General 
Court, with the consent of the Cohasset Board of Selectmen, to make constructive 
changes in the text thereof to implement the public policy objectives of the following. 

An Act to establish additional powers for the Cohasset Board of Library Trustees to 
control a Nonprofit Corporation, Cohasset Library Trust. Inc. 

Section 1. In addition to the powers and duties applicable to Boards of Library Trustees 
as are set forth in the General Laws of the Commonwealth, the Board of Library Trustees 
in the Town of Cohasset is hereby authorized to establish, maintain and operate a 
nonprofit corporation, "Cohasset Library Trust, Inc.," to be organized pursuant to Chapter 
1 80 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, for charitable and educational purposes 
within the meaning of section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code of 
1986. as amended, which purposes are to benefit and to carry out the charitable, 
educational and other exempt purposes of the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, a public 
library in, of and for the Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts. 



93 



Section 2. All the members of the Board of Directors of such Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. 
described in Section 1 of this Act shall be appointed to their position by majority vote 
of the members present and voting of the Cohasset Board of Library trustees, for terms up 
to three years, and the Cohasset Board of Library Trustees correspondingly is hereby 
authorized to remove by such majority vote any such director, with or without cause, but 
any such removal for cause shall be with notice and opportunity to be heard before the 
Cohasset Board of Library Trustees. Any Library Trustee may be eligible to serve as a 
member of the Board of Directors or as an officer of such Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. in 
accordance with the By-Laws thereof and may contemporaneously serve as such a 
director or officer, and upon the Board of Library Trustees, notwithstanding any law to 
the contrary. Any Library Trustee may participate in any matter as a Library Trustee 
involving Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. and any director or officer of the Cohasset Library 
Trust, Inc. may participate in any matter involving the Cohasset Board of Library 
Trustees notwithstanding the provisions of any other law to the contrary. 

Section 3. No part of the assets or net earnings of Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. shall inure 
to the benefit of, or be distributable to, its directors, officers or other private persons 
except that the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. shall be authorized and empowered to pay 
reasonable compensation for services rendered and to make payments and distributions in 
furtherance of the purposes set forth in Section 1 of this Act. 

Section 4. The Treasurer of the Town of Cohasset shall serve ex officio as the Treasurer 
of Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. described in Section 1 of this Act, and the Treasurer of the 
Town may participate in any particular matter as Treasurer of the Town or as Treasurer 
of the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. notwithstanding any law to the contrary. 

Section 5. Upon the effective date of this Act, the Treasurer of the Town is hereby 
authorized to pay over from the Treasury of the Town of Cohasset and otherwise turn 
over, to the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. all endowment, trust, fiduciary, or other accrued 
funds held by the Town of Cohasset for library purposes, and the Cohasset Library Trust, 
Inc. Board of Directors shall, in consultation with such Treasurer decide upon and 
implement investment decisions as to management of all funds paid over, including 
investment in accounts, funds and investment instruments notwithstanding any law to the 
contrary with respect to publicly held funds. 

Section 6. The Town of Cohasset, acting by and through Town Meeting, is hereby 
authorized to enact bylaws to carry out the purposes of this Act and to assign to Cohasset 
Library Trust, Inc. additional duties within the scope of its charitable purposes. Cohasset 
Library Trust, Inc. shall annually report to the town in the town's annual report, as to its 
doings and assets. 

Section 7. The provisions of Chapter 39 (section 23 A, 23 B and 23 C), Chapter 66 
(section 10), Chapter 30 B, and Chapter 268 A of the General Laws, shall not apply to the 
conduct of business of and by the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. 

Section 8. This Act shall take effect upon passage. 



94 



MOVED that the town vote to petition the General Court for enactment of a special law 
for benefit of the Town of Cohasset as is set forth as follows, and to authorize the General 
Court, with the consent of the Cohasset Board of Selectmen, to make constructive 
changes in the text thereof to implement the public policy objectives of the following. 

An Act to establish additional powers for the Cohasset Board of Library Trustees to 
control a Nonprofit Corporation, Cohasset Library Trust, Lie. 

Section 1. In addition to the powers and duties applicable to Boards of Library Trustees 
as are set forth in the General Laws of the Commonwealth, the Board of Library Trustees 
in the Town of Cohasset is hereby authorized to establish, maintain and operate a 
nonprofit corporation. "Cohasset Library Trust, Inc.," to be organized pursuant to Chapter 
180 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, for charitable and educational purposes 
within the meaning of section 501(c)(3) of the United States Internal Revenue Code of 
1986, as amended, which purposes are to benefit and to carry out the charitable, 
educational and other exempt purposes of the Paul Pratt Memorial Library, a public 
library in, of and for the Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts. 

Section 2. All the members of the Board of Directors of such Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. 
described in Section 1 of this Act shall be appointed to their position by majority vote 
of the members present and voting of the Cohasset Board of Library trustees, for terms up 
to three years, and the Cohasset Board of Library Trustees correspondingly is hereby 
authorized to remove by such majority vote any such director, with or without cause, but 
any such removal for cause shall be with notice and opportunity to be heard before the 
Cohasset Board of Library Trustees. Any Library Trustee may be eligible to serve as a 
member of the Board of Directors or as an officer of such Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. in 
accordance with the By-Laws thereof and may contemporaneously serve as such a 
director or officer, and upon the Board of Library Trustees, notwithstanding any law to 
the contrary. Any Library Trustee may participate in any matter as a Library Trustee 
involving Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. and any director or officer of the Cohasset Library 
Trust. Inc. may participate in any matter involving the Cohasset Board of Library 
Trustees notwithstanding the provisions of any other law to the contrary. 

Section 3. No part of the assets or net earnings of Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. shall inure 
to the benefit of, or be distributable to, its directors, officers or other private persons 
except that the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. shall be authorized and empowered to pay 
reasonable compensation for services rendered and to make payments and distributions in 
furtherance of the purposes set forth in Section 1 of this Act. 

Section 4. The Treasurer of the Town of Cohasset shall serve ex officio as the Treasurer 
of Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. described in Section 1 of this Act, and the Treasurer of the 
Town may participate in any particular matter as Treasurer of the Town or as Treasurer 
of the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. notwithstanding any law to the contrary. 



95 



Section 5. Upon the effective date of this Act, the Treasurer of the Town is hereby 
authorized to pay over from the Treasury of the Town of Cohasset and otherwise turn 
over, to the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. all endowment, trust, fiduciary, or other accrued 
funds held by the Town of Cohasset for library purposes, and the Cohasset Library Trust, 
Inc. Board of Directors shall, in consultation with such Treasurer decide upon and 
implement investment decisions as to management of all funds paid over, including 
investment in accounts, funds and investment instruments notwithstanding any law to the 
contrary with respect to publicly held funds. 

Section 6. The Town of Cohasset, acting by and through Town Meeting, is hereby 
authorized to enact bylaws to carry out the purposes of this Act and to assign to Cohasset 
Library Trust, Inc. additional duties within the scope of its charitable purposes. Cohasset 
Library Trust, Inc. shall annually report to the town in the town's annual report, as to its 
doings and assets. 

Section 7. The provisions of Chapter 39 (section 23 A, 23 B and 23 C), Chapter 66 
(section 10), Chapter 30 B, and Chapter 268 A of the General Laws, shall not apply to the 
conduct of business of and by the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc. 

Section 8. This Act shall take effect upon passage. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 10 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the purchase of equipment, supplies, and 
communication instmmentalities to improve the towns Emergency Preparedness, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Supplies for evacuation shelter $5, 000 

Calling system (reverse 911) $30,000 

MOVED that the sum of Thirty-Five Thousand Dollars ($35,000) be transferred from 
Free Cash and expended by the Town Manager for the purchase of equipment, supplies, 
and communication instrumentalities to improve the towns Emergency Preparedness as 
follows: 

Supplies for evacuation shelter $5, 000 

Calling system (reverse 911) $30,000 

Motion adopted. 



96 



Article 11 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 5.4 of the Zoning Bylaws, by adding new 
note 15: 

"In the DB district, in conjunction with the Site Plan Approval process, the Planning 
Board may authorize yards and coverage which do not conform to the requirements of 
Section 5.3.1 of the Zoning Bylaws regarding minimum yards and maximum structural 
coverage by the grant of a Special Permit in accordance with the procedures and 
standards stated in Section 12.4 of the Zoning Bylaw. The time limits for the Site Plan 
Approval process pursuant to Section 12.6 of the Zoning Bylaw may be extended by 
written agreement between the Planning Board and the applicant in order to comply with 
the deadlines for hearing and final action pursuant to Section 12.4 of the Zoning Bylaw 
and M.G.L. C.40A §9." 

Or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 12 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 5.3.1 of the Zoning Bylaw, by striking the 
following sentence under the use heading "DISTRICT DB": 

"Any permitted structure or principal use (except dwellings for occupancy by more than 
one family)" and inserting in its place the following: "Any permitted structure or 
principal use, including dwellings for occupancy by more than one family when in 
conjunction with a business within the same building." 

And further to see if the Town will vote to amend Section 5.3.1 of the Zoning Bylaw by 
striking the following sentence and the associated dimensional requirements under the 
use heading "DISTRICT DB": "Dwellings for occupancy by more than one family". 

Or take nay other action relative thereto. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted. 



97 



Article 13 

To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 7.2 of the Zoning Bylaw by adding the 
following after paragraph 13: 

"14: In the Downtown Business District, within 500' of the municipal parking lot 
bounded by Pleasant Street and James Lane, the Planning Board may authorize parking 
which does not comply with the parking requirements for a mixed use business and 
residential building by granting a Special Permit in accordance with the procedures 
outlined in Section 12.4 of this Zoning Bylaw and as a part of the Site Plan Approval 
process" 

Or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted. 

Article 14 

To see if the Town will vote to apply to the Secretary of Environmental Affairs pursuant 
to Sections 31-33 of Chapter 184 of the General Laws and any other applicable law to 
place a Conservation Restriction to be held in perpetuity by the Trustees of Reservations 
or other non profit conservation or land trust organization on an 8.715 acre parcel of land 
identified by the Assessor Map 42, Lot 041 and recorded in the Norfolk Country Registry 
of Deeds Lands Records Abstract Book page 9880-490, recorded: 05-19-1993, Inst #: 
60113 which is adjacent to Peppermint Brook, a tributary to Lily Pond to preserve the 
unique qualities of this parcel which are necessary to protect the quality of the public 
drinking water supply of the Town of Cohasset; or take any other action relative thereto. 

CITIZEN'S PETITION 



Name 



Address 



Name 



Address 



Karen M. Quigley 
John K. McNabb, Jr. 
Peter Pratt 
R. W. Swanborg 
Jim Hamilton 



27 Clay Spring Road 
53 Pond Street 
75 Ripley Road 
48 Nichols Road 
298 King Street 



Richard Brooks 
Jim Shipsky 
Richard Silva 
Stuart Ivimey 
Leonora Jenkins 



68 Nichols Road 
58 Doane Street 
445 Beechwood St. 
7 Sankey Road 
198 Jerusalem Rd. 



MOVED that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to apply to the Secretary of 
Environmental Affairs pursuant to Section 31-33 of Chapter 184 of the General Laws and 
any other applicable law to place a Conservation Restriction to be held in perpetuity by 
the Trustees of Reservations or other non profit conservation or land trust organization on 
an 8.715 acre parcel of land identified by the Assessor Map 42, Lot 041 and recorded in 



98 



the Norfolk Country Registry of Deeds Lands Records Abstract Book page 9880-490, 
recorded: 05-19-1993, Inst #: 60113 which is adjacent to Peppermint Brook, a tributary to 
Lily Pond to preserve the unique qualities of this parcel which are necessary to protect 
the quality of the public drinking water supply of the Town of Cohasset. 

A 2/3's vote required. Hand count taken Yes - 128; No - 51. Motion adopted. 

Article 15 

To see if the Town will accept a gift for the purpose of establishing a scholarship to be 
known as "The Gia Barresi Award", the terms of which scholarship are as follows: 

Recipient : a female student graduating from Cohasset High School who has achieved 
high honor roll three of four terms, has engaged in athletic or other extra curricular 
activities two of three seasons during each academic year, has enrolled in a full-time four 
year accredited college or university and has exhibited outstanding leadership qualities in 
school or in the community. 

Principal of Scholarship Fund : the amount contributed herewith together with such 
amounts as shall hereafter be contributed to the fund from time to time and which the 
Town is hereby authorized and directed to accept. 

Committee : There shall be appointed a Gia Barresi Committee consisting initially of 
Kristin W. Rosano of Cohasset, Massachusetts; Tara Pompeo of Amherst, New 
Hampshire; Jennifer Markulec of Titusville, New Jersey, Maureen Buckley of Cotati, 
California and Maureen McCarthy of Cohasset. Massachusetts ("Committee"). The 
Committee shall consult with the School Committee and the Superintendent in 
connection with the awarding of the Scholarship from time to time. The Committee 
reserves the right to designate successors on the occasion of a resignation or other 
inability to serve by an original member. 

Amount of Scholarship Stipend : the net amount accumulated on the principle to the first 
of the month in which the recipient is designated, provided the Superintendent with the 
consent and approval of the School Committee and the Gia Barresi Award Committee 
may determine the amount of each stipend from available net income. 

The Superintendent of Schools with the consent and approval of the School Committee 
after consulting with the Committee determines that the income is not sufficient to carry 
out the intent and purpose of the gift, the Superintendent may encroach upon principal in 
any year, but only to the extent of 1/20'*^ of the amount of the original principal of the 
gift. 

Use of Stipend : The amount awarded to each recipient shall be used to help defray the 
expenses of pursuing a course of study in an accredited college or university. 



99 



Administration of Scholarship : Each recipient of the scholarship shall be chosen by the 
Superintendent with the consent of the School Committee after consulting with the 
Committee. The name of each recipient, the award and the institution to be attended shall 
be announced at the graduating ceremonies of the Senior Class of Cohasset High School 
or by other appropriate means or at other appropriate times. The then members of the 
Committee shall be invited to attend the function at which such announcement is made. 

The Town of Cohasset or the Superintendent with the consent and approval of the School 
Committee, and after consultation with the Committee, may prescribe rules to effectuate 
this scholarship and the terms herein set forth. 

Investment of Principal of the fund shall be governed by the common law and statutory 
standards applicable to charitable trusts in Massachusetts. 

The administrative officer of the fund shall have in addition to those powers generally 
conferred upon a trustee in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the following 
discretionary powers: 

(a) To administer, invest, and re-invest in any property, including real 
and personal property, stocks, bonds and other securities; 

(b) To sell and exchange all or any part of the property held by the 
Fund without order or license from any court, and directs any and 
all deeds necessary or appropriate therefore; 

(c) To determine in accordance with reasonable accounting practice 
what shall belong and be chargeable to income; 

Frequency of Award : A scholarship may but need not be awarded each academic year; 
or, act on anything related thereto. 

MOVED that a gift be hereby accepted for the purpose of establishing a scholarship to be 
known as 'The Gia Barresi Award", the terms of which scholarship are as printed in the 
warrant. 

Amendment offered by James Lagrotteria. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Amendment adopted. 



100 



Article 16 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute, a sum or sums of money to be expended by the 
Town Manager to reconstruct a sidewalk on Beechwood Street from South Main Street to 
the westerly intersection of Norman Todd Road, or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOVED that One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) be appropriated, with the 
intention that these funds by available in FY 2006 and, thereafter, to be expended by the 
Town Manager, for the purpose of reconstructing a sidewalk on Beechwood Street from 
South Main Street to approximately the easterly intersection of Norman Todd Road, and, 
that to fund this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000), 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(6), of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth, as amended, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town, therefore. 

A 2/3's vote required. Motion adopted. 

Article 17 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the scope of authorization voted and the amount of 
funds appropriated for the "Cook project" pursuant to Article 4 of the November 17, 
2003, Special Town Meeting as follows: 

first to expand the authorization previously so voted by authorizing the Board of 
Selectmen, notwithstanding any limitation contained in said motion voted pursuant to 
said Article 4, to acquire by purchase, gift or eminent domain all or any part of the 
property commonly known as the Cook Property described below and as 
more particularly described in the motion voted pursuant to said Article 4, for general 
municipal purposes and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to hold same for 
general municipal purposes indefinitely, or in their discretion to dispose of all or a 
portion of the property so acquired pursuant to this Article or pursuant to said motion 
pursuant to Article 4 of the 2003 November Special Town Meeting, subject to Chapter 
30 B of the General Laws, by soliciting proposals for development of said property for 
such public or private purposes as may be determined by the Board of Selectmen; and 

second, to see what sum of money the town will vote to raise and appropriate, borrow 
pursuant to any applicable statute or transfer from available funds to increase the funds 
appropriated in the motion pursuant to Article 4 of the 2003 November Special Town 
Meeting, thereby amending the appropriation as originally voted from Four Million Five 
Hundred Thousand Dollars ($4,500,000) to a new higher total appropriation; such Cook 
project property consisting of: 



101 



(a) five parcels of vacant land located on the northerly side of Sohier Street, numbered 
235, 243, 249, 255 and 261 Sohier Street and identified as Assessor's Map 43, Plots 25, 
26, 28, 30 and 31, containing approximately 3 acres in the aggregate, and 

(b) three parcels of land located on the southerly side of Sohier Street, together with the 
buildings and improvements thereon known and numbered as 230 Sohier Street, shown 
as Lot 1 A, Parcel B and Lot C on a plan entitled" Plan of Land Sohier Street, Cohasset, 
MA" dated September 4, 2002 prepared by Perkins Engineering, Inc. and recorded with 
the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 744 of 2002 in Plan Book 503, 
containing in the aggregate, according to said plan, 18.92 acres, and shown on Assessor's 
Map 43 as Plots 2, 3A, and part of Plot 1, and Assessor's Map 42 as Plots 27, 39, and part 
of Plot 38 or to take any other action related thereto. 

MOVED that this article be indefinitely postponed. 

Motion adopted. 

It was moved and seconded that the Special Town Meeting be dissolved at 10:35 p.m. 

A true record, ATTEST: 

Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



102 



VITAL STATISTICS - 2005 

Record of birth, marriage and death records in the Town of Cohasset for 2005 are as 
follows: 

BIRTHS 

The numbers of births recorded were thirty-five males and forty females. 

MARRIAGES 

The total of marriages for 2005 was twenty-seven. Twenty-one of those were solemnized 
in Cohasset during the current year. 

DEATHS 

The total number of deaths was seventy-eight including residents of Cohasset who died 
elsewhere and non-residents who died in Cohasset. 



103 



PROSPECTIVE JUROR LIST 

Pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 234 A, Section 15, the Prospective 
Juror List is available in the Town Clerk's office with the names of those residents who 
may be summoned for juror service. 

This information is available for public inspection during normal office hours. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Marion L. Douglas 
Town Clerk 



104 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Submitted herewith is my annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2005. 
This report includes the following: 

GENERAL FUND 

1 . Historical Data 

2. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

3. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 

4. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 

5. Statement of Revenues, Budget vs. Actual 

6. Statement of State and County Assessments 
SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance, 
Town Special Revenue Funds 

3. Statement of Revenues. Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance, 

School Special Revenue Funds 
SEWER FUNDS - NORTH AND CENTRAL COHASSET 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 
WATER FUND 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Retained Earnings 

3. Report of Appropriations and Expenditures 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
TRUST FUNDS 

1. Balance Sheet (Combined) 

2. Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balance 
LONG TERM DEBT GROUP OF ACCOUNTS 

1 . Statement of Long Term Debt 

2. Statement of Debt Authorized and Unissued 
OTHER REPORTS 

1. Schedule of Reserve Fund Transfers 

2. Community Preservation Fund 

Respectfully Submitted, 
J. Michael Buckley 



105 



SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL FINANCIAL DATA 



TAX RATE 



2000 


15.09 


2001 


14.59 


2002 


11.48 


2003 


11.99 


2004 


11.89 


2005 


10.44 


2006 


10.84 




TAX LEVY 


2000 


14,980,590 


2001 


16,123,132 


2002 


17,871,592 


2003 


19,217,733 


2004 


20,572,805 


2005 


22,779,398 


2006 


23,556,917 




AVERAGE 




SINGLE FAMILY TAX BILL 


2000 


5,410 


2001 


5,772 


2002 


6,437 


2003 


6,909 


2004 


7,396 


2005 


7,804 


2006 


8,442 




FREE CASH 



TOWN VALUATION 

992,749,500 
1,105,081,000 
1,556,758,883 
1,602,813,423 
1,730,261,119 
2.086,149,189 
2.173,147,423 

OPERATING BUDGET 

20,792,165 
23,577,313 
26,132.418 
26,954,203 
28,112,193 
29,784,963 
31,724,742 



STATE AID * 

1,261.343 
1,489,049 
1,544.535 
1,491,660 

915,942 

927.721 

910,613 

STABILIZATION FUND* 



2000 
2001 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 



829,848 
1,574,628 
1.106,473 
937,302 
346.818 
737,226 



411,855 
438,199 
1.035,146 
921.309 
492.660 
38,962 



* Unrestricted 



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110 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES 
AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
GENERAL FUND 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 



Revenue: 

Property Taxes 
State Aid 
Excise Taxes 
Other Local Receipts 

Total Revenue 

Less: 

Expenditures: 

General Government 

Public Safety 

Schools 

Public Works 

Public Health 

Human Services 

Culture & Recreation 

Debt Service 

Employee Benefits & Insurance 

State and County Assessments 



Total Financing Sources (Uses)) 
Excess of Revenues Over Expenditures 
Unreserved Fund Balance July 1, 2004 
Unreserved Fund Balance June 30, 2005 



21,580,613 
2,205,571 
1,293,434 
2,147,684 



1,989,204 

3,731,549 

12,031,510 

2,051,404 

131,812 

159,259 

534,152 

3,913,328 

3,150,796 

774,433 



27,227,302 



Total Expenditures 




28,467,447 


Encumbrances: 






Encumbrances 


1,175,478 




Reserve For Expenditure (FY06) 


400,000 




Encumbrances-Prior Year 


(2,673,278) 




Total Encumbrances 




(1,097,800) 


Other Financing Sources (Uses)) 






Operating Transfers In 


635,005 




Operating Transfers Out 


(31,290) 




Overlay Surplus Release 


75,000 




Appropriation Deficits (net) 


(119,754) 




fvliscellaneous Adjustments 


(18,667) 





540,294 

397,949 

569,123 

$967,072 



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120 



STATE AND COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 
BUDGET VS. ACTUAL 



Account 

County Tax 

Retired Teachers Health Insurance 

Mosquito Control Project 

Air Pollution Control 

Metro Area Planning Council 

Registry Non Renewals 

Mass Bay Transit Authority 

Special Education 

Charter Schools 

Totals 



Estimated 


Actual 


Charges 


Charges 


$89,255 


$89,255 


399.031 


399.031 


29.975 


30.718 


3.015 


3.015 


1.928 


1.928 


5.140 


5.440 


140,876 


140.876 


12,428 


12,428 


94.941 


91.742 


$776,589 


$774,433 



121 



CENTRAL COHASSET SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



Revenue; 



User Charges 
Connection Fees 
Miscellaneous Revenue 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 

Depreciation Expense 

Debt Service 

Unpaid Bills 

Transfer to General Fund 

Encumbrances 

Total Expenditures &. Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Undesignated Fund Balance July 1 . 2004 

Add Prior year Encumbrances closed 
Transfers from General Fund 

Undesignated Fund Balance June 30. 2005 



542.539 
82.035 
17.963 



521.379 
35,321 
24.149 
12.178 
46.409 
26.171 



642.537 



(665.607) 



(23.070) 





(23.070) 



NORTH COHASSET SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



Revenue: 



User Charges 
Miscellaneous Revenue 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Depreciation Expense 
Transfer to General Fund 

Total Expenditures &. Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Undesignated Fund Balance July 1 . 2004 

Add Prior year Encumbrances closed 
Transfers from General Fund 

Undesignated Fund Balance June 30. 2005 



200.060 
1.657 



192.579 
58,333 
15.534 



201.717 



(266.446) 



(64.729) 
75.654 




10.925 



122 



WATER SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 



Revenue: 

User Charges (Commitments) 
User Charges (Abatements) 
Water Fees & Services 
Penalties & Interest 
Hydrant Charges 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 
Debt Ser\'ice 
Depreciation 

Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Retained Earnings July 1, 2004 

Less: Prior Year Accrual 

Retained Earnings June 30, 2005 



1,573.848 
(5,923) 
38,175 
15,994 
52,091 






1,674,185 


762,015 
412,367 
354,020 






(1,528,402) 




145,783 














145,783 



123 



COMMUNITY PRESERVATION FUND 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 



Revenue:* 

Surcharge Revenue 2005 
Surcharge Revenue 2004 
Surcharge Revenue 2003 
Penalties & Interest 
Investment Income 
State Distribution 
Bond & Note Proceeds 

Total Revenue 

Expenditures 

Encumbrances - Prior Year 
Encumbrances 

Total Expenditures & Encumbrances 

Excess of Revenue Over Expenditures 

Undesignated F.B. July 1, 2004 

Less: Prior Year Accrual 

Undesignated F.B. June 30. 2005 

*Cash Basis 



274,662 

2,625 

49 

526 

15.170 

254,690 



855.081 

(379,434) 
130.229 



547,723 



(605,876) 
(58,153) 
321.131 

262,978 



124 



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125 



DEBT STATEMENT 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 













07/01 /04 


FYOS FYOS 


FYOS 


06/30/05 


Project 


Amount 


Date ol 




Interest 


Outstanding 


Ret'- Fnnooal 


Principal 


Outstanding 




of issue 


issue 


Term 


Rate 


Balance 


nancino Additions 


Payment 


Balance 


Hageny Property 


«56 000 


02/1 5«6 


ISyrs 


4 00-5 OS 


240 000 


(186 000) 


27 000 


27 000 


Hageny Propety (Refi) 


495,911 


10/01/04 


7yrs 


2 00-3 25 





195,911 





195,911 


Fget TanKS i Renovations 


299 415 


02/15/96 


lOyrs 


4 00-4 95 


38 615 




30615 


8OO0 


Athletic Fields Supplement 


99 700 


02/15/96 


ISyrs 


4 00-4 95 


46100 


(32700) 


6 700 


6 700 


Athletjc Fields Supplement (Re(it) 


34 453 


10/01/04 


6yrs 


2 OC-3 00 





34 4S3 




34 453 


A!t\letic Fields 


775 000 


02/15/96 


ISyrs 


4 00-4 95 


331 800 


(221 000) 


55 400 


55 400 


Athletic Fields (Red) 


232 367 


10/01/04 


5yrs 


2 00-2 87 





232 367 





232 367 


Public Works Garage 


752 000 


02/15/96 


16yrs 


4 00-5 OS 


406 485 


(320 300) 


45 285 


42 9O0 


Public Works Garage (Refi) 




10/01/04 


7yrs 


2 00-3 25 





337 269 





337 269 


Sewet 1 & 1 


70 000 


08/1 5«€ 


20yrs 


4 65-6 10 


41,110 


(23 708) 


5 850 


11552 


Sewer 1 & 1 (Refi) 


26 145 


10/01/04 


12yr5 


2 00-3 60 





26.145 





26 145 


Landfill Capping 


1,315000 


08/1 S«6 


20yrs 


4 65-6 10 


904 730 


(648 900) 


74 490 


181 340 


Landfill Capping (Refi) 


700 531 


10/01/04 


12yrs 


2 00-3 60 





700 531 





700 531 


New Elementary School 


10140 000 


10/15«8 


19yrs 


3 90-5 75 


8 400 000 




425 000 


7 975 000 


Public Works Garage Water Main 


6O0OO 


10/15fl8 


lOyrs 


3 90-5 75 


30 000 




6000 


24 000 


Public Works Garage Supolement 


230 000 


10/15/98 


ISyrs 


3 90-5 75 


163 000 




130OO 


150 000 


Harbor Dredging 


75 000 


10/15/98 


12yrs 


3 90-5 75 


42 000 




6000 


36 000 


School Technology 


100 OOO 


10/15/98 


gyrs 


3 90-5 75 


40 000 




lOOOO 


30 000 


Sewer 1 & 1 MWPAT 96-37 


188 649 


10/06/99 


20yrs 




157 237 




8196 


149 041 


New Elementary School Completion 2 


244 500 


12/01/99 


ISyrs 


3 75-5 25 


165 000 




15 OOO 


150 000 


Flood Control 


260 000 


12/01/99 


ISyrs 


3 7S-S 25 


180 000 




20 OOO 


160 000 


Harbor Moorings 


90 000 


12/01/99 


9yr5 


3 75-5 25 


50 000 




10 000 


40 000 


Fire Trucks 


360 000 


12/01/00 


8yrs 


4 30-6 00 


225 000 




45 000 


180 000 


Harbor Improvements 


109 500 


12rt!l/00 


9yrs 


4 30-6 00 


65 OOO 




15000 


50 000 


School Technology 


150 000 


12/01/00 


4yTS 


4 30-6 00 


35 000 




35 000 





Sewer 1 & 1 


80 000 


01/15/02 


ISyrs 


2 2S-4 60 


60 000 


■ 


10000 


50 000 


HagerTy Property 


255 000 


01/15/02 


lOyrs 


2 25-4 10 


195 000 




30 000 


16S0O0 


Departmental Equipment 


196 000 


01/15/02 


4yrs 


2 25-3 40 


90 000 




45 000 


45 000 


Cemetery Construction 


750 000 


01/15«)2 


9rs 


2 25-4 10 


560 000 




90 000 


470 000 


Forest Avenue Sidewalk 


100 000 


01/15/02 


Syrs 


2 25-3 60 


60 000 




20 000 


40 000 


School Planning 


156 000 


06/1 5A)4 


20yrs 


3 00-5 00 


156 000 




11 000 


145 000 


School Construction 


16 720 000 


06/15/04 


20yr5 


3 00-5 00 


16 720 000 




535 000 


16 185 000 


Little League Fielfls 


184 600 


06/1 5/04 


13yrs 


3 00-S 00 


184 600 




19600 


165 000 


Departmental Equipment 


793 000 


06/1 5«)4 


lOyrs 


3 00-4 00 


793 000 




108 000 


685 000 


Library 


650 000 


osJ^2mt 


20yTS 


3 00-5 00 




650 000 





650 000 


Police & Fire Station 


950 000 


08/12A)4 


20yrs 


3 00-5 00 


- 


950 000 





950 000 


Central Sewer Plant 


98 288 


06/14/04 


20yrs 


3 00-5 00 


98 288 




3 288 


90 000 


Sewer Planning 


109 210 


06/15/04 


2yrs 


300 


109 210 




59 210 


50 000 



126 



DEBT STATEMENT 
RSCAL YEAR 2005 



Proiect Amount Date of 

of issue Issue 



Interest 
Rale 


07/0 1/0< 

Outstanding 

Balance 


FY05 

Re)i- 

nancinq 


FY05 
Pnnapal 
Additions 


FY05 
Principal 
Payment 


06/30/05 

Outstanding 

Balance 


3 00-3 50 


122 902 






42 902 


aoooo 




30.712077 


94.069 


1.600.000 


1 S32.S36 


30.573.610 



«r Planning 122 902 06/1 SrtM 3 yn 

TOTALS ■ TAX LEVY FUNDED 



127 



DEBT STATEMENT 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 



Amount Date o* 

of Issue Issue 





07/01/04 


FY05 


FY05 


Interest 


Outstanding 


Re(.- 


Pnnapal 


Rate 


Balance 


nancing 


Additions 



FY05 06/30/05 
Prinaoat Oulstandtng 
Payment Balance 



Rcnprmen l and Tax L«w Obligations ■ 

Straits Pond Sewer 

Sewer I & I (Red) 

Straits Pond Sewer 

Straits Pond Sewer MWPAT 96-33 

Straits Pond Sewer MWPAT 96-34 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 97-38 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 98-45 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 98-55 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 98-105 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 98-105 

Straits Pond Sewer MWPAT 96-33A 

Straits Pond Sewer MWPAT 96-34A 

Straits Pond Sewer MWPAT 96-34A 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 99-10 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 99-1 1 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 00-03 

Downtown Sewer MWPAT 00-04 

Downtown Sewer 

Straits Pond Sewer 

Downtown Sewer 

TOTALS - BETTERMENTS i TAX LEVY FUNDED 



365 000 


08/15/96 


137 264 


10/01/04 


325 000 


10/15/98 


1 930 900 


12/09/98 


1 660 400 


1 2/09/98 


840 500 


1 2/09/98 


187 400 


12/09/98 


261 700 


12/09/98 


1 630 000 


1 0/06/99 


1 625 000 


10/06/99 


1 866.327 


11/01/00 


2072 061 


11/01/00 


506 247 


11/01/00 


2 291 772 


11/01/00 


2 301,583 


ll/Ol/OO 


237 043 


11/01/00 


4 379 345 


11/01/00 


1 104 500 


12/01/00 


538 000 


12/01/00 


600 000 


01/15/02 



20yrs 


4 65-6 10 


12yrs 


2 00-3 60 


ISyrs 


3 90-5 75 


20yrs 




20yrs 




20yrs 




20yrs 




20yrs 




20yr5 




20yrs 




20yr5 




20yrs 




20yTS 




20yrs 




20yrs 




20yrs 




20yrs 




20yrs 


4 30-6 00 


20yrs 


4 30-6 00 


ISyrs 


2 25-4 60 



219 090 



225 000 

1 518 900 

1 333 400 

661 100 

147 400 

205 800 

1 364 084 

1 359 093 

1 643 200 

1 771 074 
481 OOS 

2 017 390 

2 025 817 
208 836 

3 855 186 
928 186 
451 812 
520 000 

20 936 375 



(127 692) 
137 264 



30 750 


60 648 





137 264 


20 000 


205 000 


87 200 


1 431 700 


76 500 


1 256 900 


37 900 


623 200 


8 500 


138 900 


11 800 


194 000 


68 967 


1,295,117 


68 971 


1 290 122 


77 709 


1 565 491 


104 108 


1 666 966 


8,792 


472 213 


95.572 


1 921 818 


96 044 


1 929 773 


9 830 


199 006 


182 559 


3672627 


57 162 


871 026 


27 838 


423 974 


40 000 


480 000 


1 110 202 


19 835 745 



Water Revenue Qbliflalions issued 
Water Treatment Plant 
Land Acquisrtion (Refi) 
Water Wain Proiect I & II 
System Repairs 1995-6 
System Repairs 1995-6 (Refi) 
Distribution System 
System Improvements 
System Improvements 
WoH Ptt 

System Improvements 
TOTALS - WATER REVENUE FUNDED 
GRAND TOTAL 



2 500 000 


01/01/78 


34yts 


500 


584 000 






73000 


511 000 






6yrs 


400 


305 000 






155 000 


150 000 


195 000 


08/15/96 


8yrs 


4 65-6 10 


15 0OO 






15.000 





2 450 000 


08/1 5/96 


20yrs 


4 65-6 10 


1 585 070 


(1 214 700) 




123 910 


246 460 


1 311 060 


10/01/04 


13yr5 


2 00-3 60 





1 311060 







1 311 060 


900 000 


10/15/98 


19yrs 


3 90-S 75 


650 000 






SO 000 


600 000 


1 430 500 


12/01/99 


ISyrs 


3 75-5 25 


1 040 000 






100 000 


940 000 


2,410 000 


12/01/00 


20yrs 


4 30-6 00 


2 040 000 






120 000 


1 920 000 


150 000 


01/15/02 


ISyrs 


2 25-4 60 


130 000 






10 000 


120 000 


2 617 000 


08/1 2/04 


20yr5 


3 00-5 00 







2617000 





2 617 000 






6 349.070 


96 360 


2 617 000 


646 910 


8 415.520 










S7 997 522 


200.001 


4 217 000 


3 589 648 


58824875 



128 



DEBT STATEMENT 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 



Amounl 
ot issue 



Date of 

issje 





07/01/04 


FY05 


FY05 


FY05 


06/30/05 


Interest 


Outstanding 


Refi- 


Principal 


Principal 


Outstanding 


Rate 


Balance 


nancing 


Additions 


Payment 


Balance 



mpora/v Notes 



ng Street ..and 

*wer c>ianning 

>wer Plant 

>wer Planning 

swer Planning 

im«s Property 

,mes Brook Flooding 

»wtonvill« 

itie League Ftelds 

30H Properly 

spartmental Eauipment 

mes Lane Easemani 

ib)ic Safety Butldmg 

est Corne' Cufvert 

ibiic Safety Building 

:^ool Bus 

ipartmarMai Eauiprr^ent 

H^ool Planning 

:*^ooi ConstruCTion 

arary 

VED 

ater System 

aie' System 

ale I- System 

ate' 5ys!«m 

Iter System 

TOTALS - TEMPORARY NOTES 



CPC 


19 


Sewer 


27 


Sewec 


27 


Sewer 


27 


Sewer 


27 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


Genera- 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


General 


30 


Ge'^•ral 


32 


General 


34 


General 


3e 


Waier 


62 


Waier 


62 


Water 


62 


Waier 


62 


Water 


62 



400 

100 

100 

160. 

180 

251 

100 

100 

200 

300 

918 

64 

60 

25 

890 

60 

390 

41.800 

894 

500 

2 900 

650 

2 400 



.000 
.000 
.000 

000 

.000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
200 
000 
000 
000 
000 


000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 


000 



400 000 


400 000 


lOOOOO 


100 000 




100 000 




160 000 




1 BO 000 


251 000 


251 000 


100 000 


100 000 


100 000 


100 000 




200 000 


400 000 


300 000 


185 000 


918 000 


64.200 


64 200 




60 000 


25.000 


25 000 




890 000 




60 000 


188 000 




234 000 


390 000 


25 080 000 


41 800 000 


25 000 


894 000 


500 000 


500 000 


2 900 000 


2 900 000 




650 000 


2 400 000 


2 400 000 


4000 000 




2 000 000 


2 000 000 






38 952200 


55 442 200 



400 000 

100,000 







251 000 

100.000 

lOOOOO 



400 000 

185 000 

64 200 



25 000 





leeooo 

234 000 

25 080 000 

25 00C 

500 000 

2 900 000 



2 400 000 

4 000 000 

2 000 000 

38.952.200 
36.952.200 



■IQUNTS AUTH nR17FD AND UNISSUED 



prove TientS 
provements 



aiecl 

istewater Management Ptan 

:hoO' Renovation Planning 

t>oo' Reno%raiions 

3TA Wetlands 

3TA Wells 

rw ubrary 

»w ,ibrary 

Iter Sysie 

Iter Syste 

■wer Planning 

'eetscaoe 

.fn«» Properry 

mes Broo* Fiood Cor>troi 

jrary Roof 

uer System impro^w^ents 

ton Property 

ipanmental Eouipment 

tie Harbo' Sev/«r 

ig Street Land 

iter System improvements 

Iter System improvernen*^ 

►St Corne' Cutvert 

Mrtonvilie Drainage 

me$ Lane Easement 

partmental Equipment 

e Engine Repairs 

iparrmentai Equipment 

awall Repairs 

Iter System improv/ements 

ae fiarbor Sewer 

Iter System improvements 

ep Run Sewer 

wer Planning 

Authonied i Unrss'jed 



Auih 


Autti 


Qau 




03/27/99 


200 000 


12rt)l/99 


234 000 


03/2Srt» 


25 080 000 


11/0SA)1 


1200 000 


11/05A)1 


250 000 


03/25A» 


2250 000 


ll/05rt)l 


1 000 000 


M/0Srt)1 


23 752 


03«V02 


28 246 


03A3O/02 


81000 


il/l««)2 


800 000 


ll/igrt)2 


1001000 


11/1 8A)2 


150 000 


03/29rt)3 


25 000 


03«9AJ3 


2 400 000 


11/17/03 


4500 000 


11/17/03 


185 000 


03/27/04 


100 000 


03/27/04 


400 000 


03/27/04 


3000 000 


03/27/04 


21 682190 


03/27/04 


25 000 


03/27/04 


100 000 


03/27/04 


64 200 


iim&mA 


138 000 


12A36A)4 


40 000 


12/0&04 


10000 


12A)6/04 


600 000 


12rt»04 


2000 000 


o*Kan5 


12000 000 


OAmm 


4000 000 


otm/os 


1,200 000 


04A)2/05 


100 000 




84 667 39C 



129 



TRl'ST FINDS 
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FIND BALANCE 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 



PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 
Billings Parts Fund 
Billings Common Fund 
HW Wadleigh Park Fund 
Wheelwnghl Park Fund 
Edith M Bales Fund 

CEMETERIES 

Perpetual Care-Woodside Cemetery 
Perpetual Care-Woodside CemeleryfVan) 
Perpetual Care-Beectiwood Cemetery 
Beechwood Cemetery Association 
Estate of Harry E Wilbur 
Charlotte Lincoln Bell Memorial Fund 
Isadora B Newey Fund 
Cedar Street Cemetery 

SCHOOLS 
Ripley fund 

James W Nichols Scholarship Fund 
Major William Arthur Scholarship Fund 
Alice and Walter Shuebruk Scholarship Fund 
William Ripley Jr , Athletic Fund 
John F Creamer Scholarship Fund 
Margaret M Hardy Scholarship Fund 
Helen & Malcolm Stevens Scholarship Fund 
Noel Ripley Scholarship 
Langham Scholarship 
Corcoran Scholarship 

VOLUNTARY CHECKOFF FUNDS 
Scholarship Fund 
Education Fund 
Disabled Seniors Fund 

OTHER 

Stabilization Fund 

Stabilization Fund-Sewer 

Conservation Fund 

Conservation Fund 

Beechwood Improvement Association 

Beechwood Ball Park Fund 

Retirement Fund 

Retirement Fund 

Town Pump Maintenance 

Reed Comer Trust Fund 

Arts Lottery Fund 

Captains' Walk Fund 

Historical Military Trust 

Hagerty Trust 

Elder Affairs Trust Rocklarid 

Elder Affairs Trust Hingham 

PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
Variguard Money Mart<et 
Vanguard Star Furid 
Vanguard Wellesley 

TRUST FUND TOTALS 



. Balance 


Donations & Investment Withdrawals 


Investment 


Due To/ 


Balance 


July 1 


Receipts Income 


Income 


From 


June 30 


1.703 47 






53 35 




1.756 82 


1.50164 






47 04 




1 .548 68 


7.967 28 






249 56 




8.216 84 


22.175 69 




3.182 65 


678 34 


(1.501 10) 


18.17028 


9.690 69 






303 52 




9.994 21 


171.16138 


8.750.00 


6.61348 


5.372 14 


500 00 


179.170 04 


37,84556 






2.34413 




40.189 69 


11.865 16 




608 00 


368.53 


500,00 


12,125 69 


5,47536 






17152 




5,646 88 


9,387 53 






294 05 




9,681 68 


41,377 13 






1.296 04 




42 673 17 


33.211 93 






1.040 28 




34.252.21 


5.325 74 




1 .000 00 


161,70 




4.487 44 


7.948 25 






248 95 




8.197.20 


3,152 44 






98 74 




3.251 18 


8.262.17 






25879 




8,520 96 


122.397 43 




500 00 


3.83127 




125,728 70 


19.583.30 




600 00 


610 33 




19,593 63 


1.372.37 






42 98 




1.41535 


248.305 00 




5.650 DO 


7,748 70 


(1,850 00) 


248.553 70 


194,650 84 




2.000 00 


6.085 76 




198.737 60 


48,418 59 


5.100 00 


500 OO 


1 .540 1 1 


100 00 


54.658 70 


000 


1 1 ,709 04 




5983 


300.00 


11.768 87 
300 00 


1.650 46 


350,00 




53 48 




2.053 94 


2.641 04 


460 00 




85 09 


30 00 


3.216 13 


3.830 87 


770 93 




123 95 




4.725 75 


515.642 44 






8,842 86 


(485,523 00) 


38.962 30 


454.951.12 






8.833 95 




463.795 07 


21.797 99 






373 98 




22.171 97 


12,579 51 






394 01 




12.973 52 


8,046 30 


5.250 00 




137 76 


(2.574 60) 


10,859 46 


38319 






12 03 




39522 


396.664 66 






8,532 31 




405,19697 


241.631 94 




80,000 00 


7,481 75 




169,11369 


2.209 49 






38 05 




2,247 54 


153 66 






2 36 




156 52 


12,125,27 


2.000,00 




208 00 


(5.845 00) 


8,488 27 


9,441 99 






16207 


(563 82) 


9.040 24 


754 31 






23 62 




777 93 


33,67259 




31.213.33 


59 60 




2,51886 


00 


12.397 56 




166 84 


(12.397 56) 


166 84 


00 


30.937 56 




82 34 




31.019.90 


1,030 76 






20 23 




1.050 99 


405.133 25 




21.811,30 


38,527 06 


(8.704 91) 


413.144 10 


369,079.64 






35,803 19 




404.882,83 


3.506.209 53 


77.725 09 


00 153,678,76 


142,871 69 


(517 529 99) 


3,055.597.56 












3.055.597 56 



130 



SCHEDULE OF RESERVE FUND TRANSFERS 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 



Appropriation 


07/01/04 


Annual Town Meeting 


100,000.00 




Appropriation 


12/06/04 


Special Town Meeting 


67,000.00 




Appropriation 


12/06/04 


Special Town Meeting 


93,500.00 




Appropriation 


04/02/05 


Annual Town Meeting 


100,000.00 








Total Available 


$ 


360,500.00 


D.PW. 


08/12/04 


Veterans Graves 


(1,025.00) 




Selectmen 


10/25/04 


Town Manager Search 


(10,000.00) 




Selectmen 


12/04/04 


Fraud Audit 


(12,500.00) 




Annual Audit 


12/30/04 


Consulting 


(8,500.00) 




Building Inspector 


12/30/04 


Mileage 


(750.00) 




DPW. 


03/17/05 


Sandy Beach Fence 


(4,500.00) 




Town Accountant 


03/17/05 


Server Replacement 


(5,000.00) 




Town Clerk 


04/28/05 


Special Election 


(5,27000) 




School 


07/12/05 


Unemployment 


(28,582.00) 


«r 


School 


07/12/05 


Utilities 


(93,500.00) 




DPW. 


07/12/05 


Snow & Ice 


(162,970.00) 




Police 


07/12/05 


Overtime 


(27,903.00) 








Total Transfers 


$ 


(360,500.00) 






Closing Balance 


$ 


- 



131 



Report of the Town Treasurer-Collector 

In Fiscal Year 2005, the Town continued to implement the provisions of both MGL 
Chapter 60, Sections 3C and 3D, which allows the Town to include a check-off insert 
with tax bills. As of June 30, 2005, the following funds have been collected: 

Town Scholarship Fund: $350.00 

Local Education Fund: $490.00 

Elderly & Disabled Taxation Fund: $774.93 

The Scholarship Fund will provide secondary school tuition assistance to deserving Town 
residents. These funds will be in addition to scholarships currently available to Town 
residents. 

The Educational Fund will provide supplemental educational funding for Cohasset Public 
Schools. Additionally, funds may be used for existing adult literacy programs. 

The Elderly / Disabled Fund will provide property tax relief for elderly and disabled 
Cohasset taxpayers who meet specific criteria established by the Elderly / Disabled Fund 
Committee. 

Unfortunately the annual donations to these funds have been minimal. Awards from the 
above funds will be made in future years once there are sufficient sums available. 

Also in Fiscal 2005 the Treasurer/Collector's office processed approximately 12,166 Real 
Estate tax bills, 718 Personal Property tax bills, 15,934 Motor Vehicle Excise tax bills 
and 10,557 Water/Sewer bills. 

The Treasurer/Collector's office continues to accept tax payments via the internet. To 
pay via the internet simply log onto www.mcc.net , look up your real estate, motor 
vehicle, and or water/sewer bill, and send the payment to the Town either directly from 
your bank account or by credit card. 

Special thanks to Assistant Treasurer-Collector Kathleen Mulrain and Assistant to the 
Treasurer Sandra Pamell, who were instrumental in continuing the progress of the 
department. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Linda M. Litchfield 
Treasurer-Collector 



132 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
FISCAL YEAR 2005 



lal Estate Taxes - 
>vy of 2005 
vy o( 2004 
vy of 2003 
vy of 2002 
vy of 2001 
vy of 2000 
vyof 1999 

TotAl Real Estate Taies 

iraonal Property Taxes ■ 

vy of 2005 

vy of 2004 

vy of 2003 

vy of 2002 

vy of 2001 

vy of 2000 

vyof 1999 

vy of 1 998 

lor Years 

Total Personal Property Taxes 

her Property Taxes - 

ilerred Property Taxes 

X Liens / Tax Title 

X Foreclosures / Possessions 

)mmunity Preservation Surcharge 

Total Other Property Taxes 



Balance 












Forward 


Committed 


Abated 


Refunds 


Receipts 


Liened / Adj. 





21.651.732 


113.907 


73.046 


21.229 858 


■84.547 


225846 




1.743 


26.284 


231,530 


■19.374 


-13.864 






3.030 


■53 

















-152 















^ 










90 












211.920 


21 651.732 


115,650 


102,360 


21 461.335 


■103,921 





127.665 


1.562 


5.290 


130 105 




1.343 






32 


355 




759 








77 




781 












916 












2.651 












2.374 












2.909 












12,934 













Ending 
Balance 



127 665 



1.562 



5.322 



130.537 



296 466 

■517 

-10,781 



-152 



90 

285.106 



1.288 

1,020 

682 

781 

916 

2,651 

2,374 

2,909 

12,934 

25,555 



368233 


61 ,597 








■6,470 


423,360 


255315 


28,875 






69.930 


■14,872 


199,388 


65 883 










21,434 


87.317 


10689 


281 239 


3.585 


606 


277.269 




1 1 ,680 


689.431 


90.472 








69.930 


92 


710.065 



else Taxes - 
)tor Vehicle 2005 
)tor Vehicle 2004 
)tor Vehicle 2003 
)tof Vehicle 2002 
)lor Vehicle 2001 
)lor Vehicle 2000 
)lor Vehicle 1 999 
)tor Vehicle 1 998 
)lor Vehicle (Pnor Years) 
lat Exase (All Yearsi 

Total Excise Taxes 






1,074.556 


16,150 


6 688 


1,003 106 


49,036 


241,583 


13.915 


6 932 


273,988 


12471 


13 033 


7.158 


6 846 


19,854 


6516 




59 




3,001 


4.852 








489 


3.023 








158 


5866 




28 




427 


9 784 








34 


24 040 








128 


5,114 


9.198 


1.835 




9383 


20.702 


1.338.370 


39.145 


20 466 


1,310,568 



61.988 
9,648 
5.338 
3,456 
4,363 
2,865 
5,411 
9.750 

23.912 
3.094 

129.825 



partmental Charges ■ 

3ler Use Charges 
aier Liens 

wer ■ Central Dislnct 
wer ■ North Distnci 
wer Liens 
>onngs Fees 
ibuiance Fees 
acDortioned Betlerments 
pohioned Betlennenis 
immitled Interest 



210779 


1.573.085 


5.355 


3384 


1 583 437 


-24,760 


173,696 


2806 


28.169 






20310 


-2,225 


8440 


54 356 


558,701 


2732 


1425 


537 705 


■10,862 


63183 


16 290 


219 198 


2,285 


22 


208 988 


■7,326 


16.911 


1 350 


20.310 






17 749 




3.911 


2711 


35.670 


630 




37,751 







240 004 


507.666 


161,021 


613 


324 558 




262,704 


6.675465 








70029 


-459,210 


6146,226 


10,665 


460.962 


1 462 




459520 


-945 


9.700 


1.700 


66783 


190 




66355 




1,936 



133 



RECONCILIATION OF TOWN CASH ACCOUNTS 
JUNE 30, 20 05 



Balance in Treasury July 1 , 2004 $30,002,770.55 

Receipts $82,981,242.50 

Disbursements ($101,401,726.64) 

Balance in Town Treasury June 30, 2005 $1 1,582,286.41 



Cash on Hand $150.00 

Bank of America 1 7,3 1 4.62 

Eastern Bank 19,097.85 

Hingham Institute For Savings 4,729.186.72 

Hingham Institute For Savings - Trust Funds 900,01 1 .94 

Mass. Municipal Depository Trust 74,306.30 

Mass. Municipal Depository Trust - Trust Funds 2,51 8.86 

Mellon Bank 1,254.255.01 

Pilgrim Cooperative Bank 1,092,941.76 

Pilgrim Cooperative Bank - Trust Funds 586.432.72 

Rockland Trust 782,089.53 

Rockland Trust - Trust Funds 1,216,191.51 

State Street Bank & Trust 39.817.07 

Vanguard Group - Trust Funds 867,972.52 



Total Funds in Town Custody $1 1,582,286.41 



134 



WA6ES AND SALARIES PAID 
CALENDAR YEAR 2005 



Lasr Name 


First Name 


Primar\ DeDartmcnt 


Gross Pay Last Name 


First Name 


Primarv Department 


Gross Pav 












QUILL 


MARY 


Board of Assessors 


60.997 BRYANTON 


KATHLEEN 


Elder Affairs 


55,847 


KRUPCZAK_ 

WARNER 


DEBRA 

ELLEN 

MARY 
ELSA 


Board of Assessors 


42,210 BARRETT 


CAROL 


Elder Affairs 


29,744 


Board of Assessors 


29.563 TEWKSBURY 


HAMILTON 


Elder Affairs 


16.952 
16.807 


GRANV1LLE_ 

MILLER 


Board of Assessors 


1.267 HORSEFIELD 


MARTHA jElder Affairs 


Board of Assessors 


1,233 SALERNO 


GERTRUDE 


Elder Affairs 


12.514 


PATROLIA 


MICHAEL 


Board of Assessors 


1,200 DONOHUE 


JAMES 


Elder Affairs 


8,543 


















Depamnent Total 


$ 136,470 




Department Total 


$ 140.408 








t 








TRADD 


TARA 


Board of Health 


53,136: ADAMS iBRIAN 


Facilities 


65,730 


FITZSIMMONS 


JUDITH 


Board of Health 


39,7451 LINCOLN 


DAVID 


Facilities 


56,745 


GODZIK 


JOSEPH 


Board of Health 


25,5301 LINCOLN 


DEREK 


Facilities 


52,661 


GOODWIN 


MARY 


Board of Health 


4,529 lEMANUELLO 


ANTHONY 


Facilities 


39,543 


BENNETT 


JANET 


Board of Health 


Il3i ISULLIVAN 


DANIEL 


Facilities 


2.299 


1 - 


1 




1 






Department Total 


$ 123.052 1 




Departmenl Total 


$ 216.978 




1 










EGAN 


ROBERT 


Building Depanment 


67.468 LINCOLN 


ROGER 


Fire Department 


99.567 


MURRAY 


SANDRA 


Building Department 


19.9691 HERN AN 


JOHN 


Fire Department 


81.976 






_ _. 






SMITH 


DANIEL 


Fire Department 


76,627 


{ 1^ Depamnent Total 


S 87.438 


BELANGER 


RANDY 


Fire Deparmieni 


75,692 










GURRY 


JAMES 


Fire Department 


75.674 


WIGMORE 


THOMAS 


Civilian Dispatch 


51,275 


jMAHONEY 


FRANCIS 


Fire Department 


70.582 


GRANT 


CHRISTOPHER 


Civilian Dispatch 


47.741 


BILODEAU 


PAUL 


Fire Deparmieni 


70,579 


DOUGLAS 


PATRICIA 


Civilian Dispatch 


43.947 


STARVAGGl 


PETER 


Fire Depanment 


69,890 


HUSSEY 


JOHN 


Civilian Dispatch 


43.380 ! IPROTULIS 


ROBERT 


Fire Department 


68,971 


LOWER Y 


PATRICIA 


Civilian Dispatch 


35.354 IDOCKRAY 


JOHN 


Fire Department 


68.806 


BROOKS 


COREY 


Civilian Dispatch 


14,988 


MARR 


MATTHEW 


Fire Departmenl 


67,759 


GEDDES 


SASHA 


Civilian Dispatch 


*" 13,456 


TRASK 


MARK 


Fire Departmenl 


67.044 


MCGUIRE 


KATHLEEN 


Civilian Dispatch 


5,550 


SILVIA 


ROBERT 


Fire Departmenl 


66.634 


WEEKS 


DAVID 


Civilian Dispatch 


3.277 


RUNEY 


JAMES 


Fire Department 


66.069 


MCCARTHY 


KELLI 


Civilian Dispatch 


3.095 


CURLEY 


JAMES 


Fire Departmenl 


64.836 


TERRILL 


KENNETH 
MELISSA 


Civilian Dispatch 


I.I20I ASCI 


DAVID 


Fire Department 


63.521 


SOUSA 


Civilian Dispatch 


485 1 ROSANO 


RANDALL 


Fire Departmenl 


62.929 




IFINEGAN 


THOMAS 


Fire Deparrment 


61.464 






Depanment Total 


S 263.668 


MORRISON 


LAURA 


Fire Department 


58,758 








1 


FIORI 


JAMES 


Fire Departmenl 


58,544 


NOONAN 


NANCY 


Conservation Commission 


38.546; 1 LEONE 


SHARON 


Fire Department 


56,527 










' WENZLOW 


ERIC 


Fire Departmenl 


55,560 






Depanment Total 


S 38.546 


HALL 


JAMES 


Fire Department 


37,844 










ICOVINO 


RICHARD 


Fire Department 


28.283 


SESTITO 


ANTHONY 


Dept of Public Works 


73.318 


MCKAY 


THOMAS 


Fire Departmenl 


5,550 


SESTITO 


CARL 
BOYD 


Depi of Public Works 

Dept of Public Works 


68.454' IMAYMARD 


STEVEN 


Fire Department 


3.600 


LIVINGSTON 


59.295 1 BROOKE 


WILLIAM 


Fire Department 


ISO 


SWANSON 


ANDREW 


Dept of Public Works 


57.186 THOMAS 


ANDREW 


Fire Department 


131 


BUTMAN 


KENNETH 


Dept of Public Works 

Dept of Public W orks 


53.599t jGIESE 


MICHAEL 


Fire Departmenl 


120 


KELLY 
THAYER 


MARK 


52.940' ! 








KENNETH 


Dept of Public Works 


49.869 j 1 




Depanment Total 


S 1,583.688 


GUARENTE 
PIE>ENBRINK 


CHARLES 
ROBERT 


Depi of Public Works 
Dept of Public Works 


49.071 


r^ 






49.0331 IMUNCEY 


JOHN 


Harbormaster 


r_ 48.410 


EDGETT 
MURRAY 


PHILIP 
CHRISTOPHER" 


Dept of Public Works 
Dept of Public Works 


43.168' BAGGS 


ROBERT 


Harbormaster 


13,452 


42,353' JOHNSON 


ROBERT 


Harbormaster 


2.556 


MARSH 


HERBERT 


Dept^of Public Works 


41.593 BRADFORD 


SCOTT 


Harbormaster 


1.980 


BAKER 


GRANVILLE 


Dept of Public W orks 


41.456 DICKSON 


CLIFFORD 


Harbormaster 


500 


SNOW 


MARY 


Dept of Public W orks 


34.5301 








VANGEL 


LARRY 


Dept of Public Works 


13.870, 




Department Total 


S 66.898 


LANZILLOTTI 


DYLAN 


Dept of Public Works 


5,7761 






— 


ZYRKOWSKI 


BRIAN 


Dept of Public Works 


5.749' 1 












1 












Department Total 


$ 741.262 






r 



135 



WA&E5 AND SALARIES PAID 
CALENDAR YEAR 2005 



Last Name 


First Name 


Pnman Deoartmcnt 


Gross Pay 


Last Name 


First Name 


Primary DcDartmcnt 


Gross Pay 








, 


[ 




raTferty 














JACQUELINE 


Library 


60,936 


MANNING 


THOMAS 


Police Department 


2,448 


MOODY 


SHARON 


Library 


45.831 


CONNOLLY 


BRYAN 


Police Department 


2.293 
2,010 


COUGHLIN 


MARY 


Library 


40,546 


SWEENEY 


RONALD 


Police Department 


GAILUNAS 


PAUL 


Library 


39.527 


LUCAS 


MATTHEW 


Police Department 


2.000 


SIMONS 


JUDITH 


Library 


22.771 


PIERCE 


CHARLES 


Police Department 


1,940 


DU'YER 


1 JANET 


Library 


21.124 


MACDONALD 


RICHARD 


Police Department 


1,763 


WALSH 


LAURIE 


Library 


20,794 


CASTRO 


DENISE 


Police Department 


1,744 


NORTON 


KRISTIN 


Library 


18,197 


O'HANLEY 


ROSS 


Police Department 


1,680 


WALSH 


GAYLE 


Library 


13.459 


CASAGRANDE 


ROBERT 


Police Department 


1.665 


LONDERGAN 


MARY 


Library 


8.683 


NOGUEIRA 


FRANK 


Police Depanment 


1,665 


WATSON 


MARGARET 


Library 


4,918 


CAVANAUGH 


SEAN 


Police Department 


1,440 


MCEWEN 


HELEN 


Library 


, 4.875 


iRlCE 


TAMI 


Police Depanment 


1,400 


W^TROUS 


SUSAN 


Library 


2.070 


.K.ILROY 


PAUL 


Police Department 


1,388 


ISIHARA 


IKUKO 


Library 


1,906 


HENVEY 


CAROL 


Police Department 


I.2II 


WATSON 


1 THOMAS 


Library 


1.356 


DURGIN 


ROBERT 


Police Department 


1,138 


OHRENBERGER IMARJORIE 


Library 


1,252 


MCKENNA 


RICHARD 


Police Department 


1,120 


SAVAGE 


EMILY 


Library 


1. 178 


HAYES 


[RICHARD 


Police Department 


1.035 


RICHARDSON 


COLLEEN 


Library 


1.035 


1 DEROSA 


[RONALD 


Police Department 


1,000 


TARPEY 


ELLEN 


Library 


855 


SHEA 


(GREGORY 


Police Department 


983 


DALEY 


JEANNETTE 


Library 


559 


TRACEY 


PHILIP 


Police Department 


880 


REYNOLDS 


ICHRISTOPHER 


Library 


510 


CORRIGAN 


MICHAEL 


Police Department 


800 




1 






! CORSON 


[KENNETH 


Police Department 


765 






Department Total 


$ 312.382 


IMCGRAIL 


ALICIA 


Police Depanment 


728 






BRUNO 


ROCCO 


Police Department 


720 


HARRINGTON 


ELIZABETH 


Plannmg Board 


2I.7II 


DURANT 


•KENNETH 


Police Department 


720 


PILCZAK 


JOANN 


Plannmg Board 


20,453 


MERLO 


JOSE 


Police Department 


720 


; 




iFARINA 


[COREY 


Police Department 


700 
660 




1 


Department Total 


$ 42,164 


COLETTA 


PAUL 


Police Department 


1 1 




STEVERMAN 


ERIK 


Police Department 


660 


COG ILL 


; DAVID 


Police Depanment 


139,771 


MCINNIS 


GERALD 


Police Department 


645 


HLSSEY 


: JAMES 


Police Department 


^ 113,518 


SULLIVAN 


KEVIN 


Police Department 


645 


QUIGLEY 
PETERS 


'WILLIAM 


Police Depanment 


103.230 


AHLSTEDT 


RICHARD 


Police Department 


605 


SHELLEE 


Police Depanment 


102,089 


SUTHERLAND 


JAMES 


Police Department 


500 


CONTE 


IJOHN 


Police Department 


97,313 


AIGUIER 


BRIAN 


Police Department 


480 


SMALL 


Ijohn 


Police Department 


97,206 


KELLEY 


iJAMES 


! Police Department 


480 


TREANOR 


; JEFFREY 


Police Department 


94,012 


BLAZUK 


ROBERT 


Police Department 


380 


MCLEAN 


JAMES 


Police Department 


93.353 


CADIGAN 


THOMAS 


Police Department 


380 


YANNIZZI 


i FRANCIS 


Police Department 


78,544 


DEIORIO 


GARY 


Police Department 


360 


HL'NT 


1 GARRET 


Police Department 


68.394 


jKEEFE 


BARRY 


Police Depanment 


360 


LEXNON 


iGRECORY 


Police Depanment 


66.157 


1 HASAN 


LATEEF 


Police Department 


330 


WILSON 


IPAUL 


Police Depanment 


64.962J 


NEE 


IJOHN 


Police Department 


330 


BAGLEY 


1 EDWARD 


Police Department 


63,290 


FIDROCKI 


WILLIAM 


Police Department 


320 


TARANTINO 


CHRISTY 


Police Depanment 


60,204 


SAUNDERS 


SCOTT 


Police Department 


308 


GRASSIE 


FREDERICK 


Police Department 


56,279 


HANCOCK 


EDWARD 


Police Department 


280 


MATOS 


ILISA 


Police Depanment 


53.406 


MCCUE 


IFRANIS 


Police Department 


255 


KENNEY 


1 PATRICK 


Police Department 


52,203 


DESHLER 


KEITH 


Police Department 


240 


DOYLE 


JENIFER 


Police Department 


42,990 


HARLAND 


BRAD 


1 Police Department 


240 


AINSLIE 


'LAWRENCE 


Police Department 


22.010 


KETTELL 


SCOTT 


Police Department 


240 


ENGLISH 


] WILLIAM 


Police Depanment 


14,305 


iKRUG 


EDWARD 


Police Department 


240 


FORD 


1 ANDREW 


Police Department 


12.537 


IMANN 


ALEXANDER 


Police Depanment 


240 


MURPHY 
NOONAN 


:paul 


Police Depanment 


9.551 


1 MAYER 


JOSEPH 


Police Department 


240 


■BRIAN 


Police Department 


9.070 


SILVIA 


Iharry 


: Police Department 


240 


CURRIE 


; ALBERT 


Police Department 


7.570 


SMYTH 


ROBERT 


; Police Department 


240 


THAYER 


IDEREK 


Police Depanment 


6,161 


CARVELLO 


JOHN 


Police Department 


120 


RICE 


1 ROBERT 


Police Department 

Police Department 


5,700, 
5,600 


COUGHLIN 


ALICIA 


Police Depanment 
Police Department 


120 
120 


GOODMAN 


CHRISTOPHER 


DEBOER 


TODD 


PEEBLES 


BRIAN 


Police Department 


3,722 


DELISLE 


JOSHUA 


Police Depanment 


120 


W'ALETKUS 


ALAN 


Police Department 


3,305 


DONOGHUE 


MICHAEL 


Police Department 


120 


PERAINO 


jMICHAEL 


Police Department 


3.036 


GREENE 


GEORGE 


Police Department 


120 


BROWN 


: DONALD 


Police Department 


2,905 


KILROY 


JEFFERY 


Police Depanment 


120 


MURPHY 


JOSEPH 


Police Depanment 


2.842 


LINCOLN 


RONALD 


Police Depanment 


120 



136 



WASES AND SALARIES PAID 
CALENDAR YEAR 2005 



Lasl Vame 


Fini Name 


Primarv Dcnartment 


Gross Pav 




Last Name 


First Name 


Primar> Department 


Gross Pav 

























MAHONEY 


JON 


Polict Department 


120 HORIGAN 


'SUSAN 


School Department 


74,208 


MALLOY 
MCCARTHY 


KEVIN 


Police Depanmeni 


120 NEUNDORF 


JOSEPH 


School Department 


73.651 


STEPHEN 


Police Department 


120' CRONIN 


FRANCES 


School Department 


72,617 


O'BRIEN 
OLSSON 


GERALD 
GLEN 


Police Depanment 


1201 WELCH 


MICHAEL 


School Department 


72,469 


Police Department 


120 MCGRAIL 


PATRICIA 


School Department 


72,451 


PHILLIPS 


KRIS 


Police Department 


I20j YESS 


DENISE ANNE 


School Department 


72.421 


RAMSEY 


ROBERT 


: Police Department 


120! DELORENZO 


JOHN 


School Department 


72.325 


TOSCANO 


GIUSPPE 


Police Department 


120^ FREE 


JEAN 


School Department 


72.207 


ZUBRIN 


:WILLIAM 


Police Depanment 120 BRINDLEY 


PENELOPE 


School Department 


71,988 






1 




WELLS 


: BARBARA 


School Department 


71,651 






Department Total 


$1,603,120 


COLLINS 


ROSALIE 


School Deparrmenl 


71.277 








: FUSCO 


CYNTHIA 


School Department 


70,651 


WORLEY 


|JOHN 


1 Recreation Commission 


62.967 i THOMAE 


ANN 


School Deparrmenl 


70,437 


EOUl 


MARTHA 


Recreation Commission 


6.000, j GORDON 


CYNTHIA 


School Depanmeni 


70,109 


RICHARDSON 


CHELSEA 


Recreation Commission 


5.823^ iCORKHUM 


SUZI 


School Depanmeni 


68,768 


WALSH 


ALLISON 


Recreation Commission 


3.735: ;LAF0UNTAIN 


ALLEN 


School Depanment 


66.899 


BATES-MCARTH REBECCA 


Recreation Commission | 3,360' |NEWKIRK 


; SCOTT 


School Depanmeni 


66.089 


STEVENSON 


JEREMIAH 


Recreation Commission 


3.252- 1 MAGNUSSEN 


; NANCY 


School Depanment 


66,018 


BONNER 


KIMBERLY 


Recreation Commission 


2.965 BUCKLEY 


IJOHN 


School Depanmeni 


65,418 


MCDONALD 
MCDONALD 


SARAH 
LINDSEY 


Recreation Commission 


2.722 


BOUCHARD 


1 JOSEPH 


School Depanment 


65,215 
64,967 


! Recreation Commission 


2.623 


ROLFE 


ROBERT 


School Depanment 


KRUPCZAK 
BONNER 


JARED 


j Recreation Commission 


2.604 


IRITTS 


, JUDITH 


School Department 


64,935 


KAREN 


1 Recreation Commission 


2.026 




JONES 


1 DANIEL 


School Department 


•64,508 


BREWER 
PLANTE 


NELL 
NICOLE 


1 Recreation Commission 
1 Recreation Commission 


1.933 




LEVY 


ROBERT 


School Depanment 


64,320 


1.908 


BARBIERI 


1 DIANE 


School Department 


63,604 


CARBONE 


WILLIAM 


Recreation Commission 


I.629I IBIAGINI 


STEVEN 


School Department 


63,198 


PORTANOVA 


KATIE 


1 Recreation Commission 


1,628! isWARTZ 


' LAURA 


School Department 


62,610 


DALEY 


KATHLEEN 


Recreation Commission 


1.288 1 BERRY 


;maureen 


School Depanmeni 


62.473 


ST PIERRE 


CHRISTINA 
FLORENCE 


Recreation Commission 


U87 'HENRY 


DEBORAH 


School Depanmeni 


62,180 


CLOUGHERTY 
FORD 


Recreation Commission 


1.1.34 ILAUZON 


ELIZABETH 


School Depanmeni 


6 1 ,664 


BRENDAN 


Recreation Commission 


1.098 





LECOUNT 


ROBERT 


School Department 


61,429 


BOLGER 
MICHAUD 


BRIAN 
BRENDAN 


Recreation Commission 


1.008 


BIERMAN 


CAROLE 


School Department 


60,911 


Recreation Commission 


1.008 


OLSON 


HEIDI 


School Department 


60.91 1 


SMITH 


JACQUELINE 


Recreation Commission 


918 


JORDAN 


'KATHLEEN 


School Department 


l~ 60.450 


SIMMS 
DALEY 


CHRISTOPHER 


Recreation Commission 


887 


WINTER 


'LAUREN 


School Department 


60.216 


LAUREN 


Recreation Commission 


528 


'COOK 


1 LAUREN 


School Department 


60.175 


CONWAY 


COLIN 


; Recreation Commission 


117 Imarks 


BRYAN 


School Depanmeni 


60.010 










Imacinnis 


|JOHN 


School Department 


[_ 59.578 
59.059 







Depanmeni Total 


S 114,447 


JSULLIVAN 


VICTORIA 


School Depanmeni 






1 MURPHY 


MICHELLE School Department 


58.611 


WALSH 'DENISE 
GILL ! LINDA 
GILL 1 MICHAEL 


School Depanment 


125.000' i JOHNSTON 


KARIN 


School Depanmeni 


58,136 


JSchool Depanmeni 

! School Depanmeni 


92.0741 iMGRRISSEY 


PATRICIA 


School Department 


58,036 


91.287 IBEAL 


DEBORAH 


School Department 


58.035 


LEARY 


EDWARD 


School Deparrmenl 


87.891 IMCGRATH 


ELIZABETH 


School Depanmeni 


57,796 


CISNEROS 
SHEEHAN 


KENNETH 

janet""' 


School Depanment 


87.239 iWEYDT 


MICHAEL 


School Department 


56.578 


School Depanmeni 


86.139 IROHRER 


EILEEN 


School Department 


56.578 


MAGNUSSEN 


DAVID 


! School Depanmeni 


86.013 O'M ALLEY 


DIANE 


School Department 


56.578 


GAULEY 


KEITH 


1 School Depanment 


83.939 GIBSON 


COLLEEN 


School Department 


56.391 


LEONARD 


EDWARD 


'School Depanment 


83.331 HANSON 


JEANNE 


School Department 


55.983 


SWEENEY 


TORIN 


School Depanment 


81.7211 MCNAMARA 


PAMELA 


School Department 


55,603 


PORTER 


ANNE LESLIE 


School Department 


80,189] DUG AN 


MARY 


School Department 


55.545 


DYKAS 


KEVIN 


j School Depanmeni 


76,821 
75.907^ 


iFENNESSEY 


RUTH 


School Department 


54,906 


GALLOTTA 


ALAN 


! School Depanment 


iTRITTO 


STEPHANIE 


School Depanment 


54.397 


BERMAN 


CHRISTINE 


School Depanmeni 


75.569 CHARWAT 


MARY 


School Department 


53.223 


HURLEY 


MARY 


t School Depanmeni , 


74.783 SULLIVAN 


ALLISON 


School Department 


52.125 


LEE 


MARGARET 


School Department 


74.749 OWENS-RIGBY 


ELIZABETH 


School Department 


51.904 


DUFFY 


MAUREEN 


School Depanmeni 


74.7221 DEWAAL 


JULIA 


School Department 


51.288 


FORD 


RONALD 


School Depanment 


74.608; KEATING 


LAURA 


School Department 


51,141 


CISNEROS 
WOMERSLEY 


ELIZABETH 
KATHLEEN 


School Depanment 


74.498' lANTOLINI 


JOEL 


School Department 


51,000 


School Depanment 


74.417 BERKOWITZ 


NINA 


School Deparrmenl 


50,912 


CASSIAN! 


JOAN 


School Depanment 


74.330 THOMAS P AOL 


1' LAUREN 


School Depanmeni 


50,620 



137 



WAGES AND SALARIES PAID 
CALENDAR YEAR 2005 



Last Name 


First Name 


Priinar-\ Deoartment 


Gross Pay Last Name 


First Name 


Pfimar\ Department 


Gross Pay 












O'BRIEN 






1 ; 








iCASSANDRA 


School Department 


50,448: GOLDEN 


NICHOLAS 


School Department 


27.571 


CRIMMINS 


CAROLYN 


School Department 


50.208 ,DOW 


DAMA 


School Department 


26.819 


BROWN 


GENEVIEVE 


School Deparment 


49,904: MIRARCHI 


KATHLEEN 


School Department 


26.709 


BERMAN 


ANN 


School Department 


49.456 BREWIN 


RACHAEL 


School Department 


26.689 


FOLEY 


KERRI ANN 


School Department 


48.668 MITCHELL 


JANICE 


School Department 


26.038 


WOLLAM 


RACHEL 


School Department 


48,591 ZAPPOLO 


SANDRA 


School Department 


24.953 


COLEY 


SUZANNE 


School Department 


' 48,501. JORDAN 


MARGARET 


School Department 


24,456 


GATELY 


KELLY 


School Department 


48,316 j LITCHFIELD 


MARGARET 


School Department 


24.099 


WOOLEY 


STEPHANIE 


School Department 


48.232} SMITH 


MARGARET 


School Department 


23.899 


KITE 


WILLIAM 


■School Department 


47,9421 1 SADLER 


SUSAN 


School Department 


22.740 


CALLAHAN 


'JEAN 


School Department 


' 47,254, ;CANZATER 


BEATRICE 


.School Department 


22.671 


THORELL 


JENNIFER 


School Department 


46,676 j TOWNER 


JOHN 


'School Department 


21.893 


SMITH 


RICHARD 


School Department 


46,195 WATERS 


SHARYN 


School Department 


21.827 


MULLEN 


'LISA 


School Department 


45,526 iDIMINNIE 


LESLIE 


School Department 


21.530 


JONES 


THOMAS 


School Department 


45,323; |R -GRIFFITHS 


GRACE 


School Department 


20.873 


BEAUDRY 


KAYNE 


School Department 


45,322 


CLAY 


VIRGINIA 


School Department 


20.692 


OGDEN 


ELIZABETH 


1 School Department 


45,262 


iGREGORY 


JANE 


School Department 


20.538 


LEVENE 


JASON 


'School Department 


45,1 19i ISHAFER 


MEREDITH 


School Department 


20.255 


GITTENS-CARLE ALEISA 


School Department 


44,781 iMELONE 


JESSICA 


School Department 


20.228 


TRASK 


AMY 


; School Department 


43,877 


INICHOLLS 


HEATHER 


School Department 


19.341 


CLARK 


JENNIFER 


1 School Department 


43.865 


SASSO 


ADAM 


School Department 


19.305 


GIULIANO 


[LAURA 


School Department 


43.423 




MARTIN 


APRIL 


School Department 


18.514 


DONOVAN 


NANCY 


! School Department 


43.420j 


AYER 


ALISON 


School Department 


18.381 


FORTIN 


EMILY 


School Department 


43,132 


KURTZ 


JACQUELINE 


School Department 


18.381 


HOLLAND 


THEODORE 


School Department 


43,118| ,LEHR 


JOANNE 


School Department 


18.381 


MRZYGLOD 


NANCY 


1 School Department 


43,000 


SHANNON 


DEBORAH 


School Department 


18.381 


BIERWERT 


JANICE 


1 School Department 


42,048 


ICREIGHTON 


NANCY 


School Department 


18.381 


AMES 


DAVID 


School Department 


40,7591 JKANE 


ELLEN 


School Department 


18,381 


FORTIN 


JONATHAN 


School Department 


40.363: [KERRIGAN 


JOAN 


School Department 


18.381 


DANIELSON 


JOHN 


School Department 


40,150 [MCCARTHY 


ALICE 


School Department 


18.381 


HOSKIN 


STEPHANIE 


School Department 


39,913 SMITH 


PEARL 


School Department 


18.381 


BOWSER 


[CAREY 


School Department 


39,859 iWILD 


LINDA 


School Department 


18.381 


NOBLE 


STEPHANIE 


1 School Department 


39,615 |MASTROMARIN( 


MARY 


School Deparrment 


18.198 


DEVIN 


MAURA 


School Department 


39,113 IQUEENAN 


ICAROLYN 


School Department 


18.041 


LANKOW 


JENNIFER 


School Deparrment 


38,995 


CLIFFORD 


DIANE 


School Department 


17.872 


COLEMAN 


MEGHAN 


School Department 


38,426 


iRIPATRAZONE 


JOANNE 


School Department 


17.872 


LEAHY 


DENISE 


School Department 


37,771 




ANDRUS 


JOAN 


School Department 


17.872 


HATHON 


ROSE 


' School Department 


37,319 




LINCOLN 


KAREN 


School Department 


17.812 


DEGENNARO 


DAVID 


School Department 


36,957 


MCTIGUE 


JOAN 


School Department 


17.769 


PESCATORE 


JANE 


School Department 


36,865 


SCHREIBER 


ELISE 


School Department 


17.651 


SULLIVAN 


ERIN 


School Department 


36,510 


ISWANBORG 


ANN 


School Department 


17.172 


PETERSON 


KRISTINA 


School Department 


35,697 


1 MARAT 


MARY 


School Department 


17.146 


ZACCARDl 


PATRICIA 


School Department 


35,342 


JPALMIERI 


VINCENT 


School Department 


17.090 


STERNALA 


ELIZABETH 


School Department 


35,000 ; INELLIGAN 


CATHERINE 


School Department 


16.809 
16,733 


MURPHY 


KAREN 


School Department 


34,835 


1 REGAN 


BRENDA 


School Department 


ENTWISTLE 


CAITLYN 


' School Department 


34,505 


IREAD 


VICTORIA 


School Department 


16.590 


SWENSON 


JILL 


School Department 


33,873 


WILEY 


MEG 


School Department 


16.205 


FIGUEIREDO 


JUDITH 


: School Department 


33,798 


ICURLEY 


LILLIAN 


School Department 


15.856 


MCCARTHY 


ANNE 


' School Department 


33,699 


; DAVIS 


AMY 


School Department 


15.683 


REDMAN 


JANE 


School Department 


33.699 1 RAYMOND 


KRISTIE 


School Department 


15.408 


MEADE 


JONI 


School Deparrment 


33.690 


[D'ALOTTO 


BRENDA 


School Department 


15.377 


SUSARCHICK 


MARYBETH 


School Department 


31,519 


iDONATO 


MARIA 


School Department 


15.355 


FIGUEIREDO 


JENNY 


School Department 


31,167 


;ONEIL 


THOMAS 


School Department 


15.159 


MCINTOSH 


SHANNON 


School Department 


30,381 


1 GRANDE 


LUCIA 


School Department 


15.084 


MULLIN 


BARBARA 


School Department 


29.666 


KILROY 


COLIN 


School Department 


15,016 
14.903 


SCHWANTNER 


DERRY 


School Department 


29,337 


SWARTZ 


KIMBERLY 


School Department 


COLLINS 


JUDITH 


School Department 


29,173 iOTlARA 


MEGHAN 


School Department 


14.871 


HEPP 


KATHLEEN 


School Deparrment I 


29,118) |CLARK 


JAMES 


School Department 


14.833 


DICKSON 


KELLY 


School Department 


28,6701 ; LEWIS 


ARNA 


School Department 


14.675 


GRUOSSO 


JACQUELYN 


School Department | 


28,5671 WELCH 


SUSAN 


School Department 


14.596 


ARONSON 


CARRIE 


School Department 


28.121 i RIOUX 


CASSANDRA 


School Department 


14,596 



138 



WAGES AND SAL'iRIES PAID 
CALENDAR YEAR 2005 



Last Name 

schillFr 


fint \amt 


Primar\ Department 


Gro?s Pa> 


Last Name 


First Name 


Primary Department 


Gross Pay 


















"'BRIAN 






PATRICK 


School Department 


14.431 
14,123 


PATTISON 


School Department 


4,644 


HOGAN 

BLAIR 


MICHAEL 
BRENDA ' 


' School Deparmienl 


'buELLETTE 


ANNE 
CHARLES 


School Department 
School Depanment 


4.507 

4,426 

^ ' 4,426 


School Department 


13.700 


CURRAN 


MONACO 


LYNN 


School Department 


13.627 


ILEARY 


ROBERT 


School Department 


SEPPALA 


LEANE 


School Department 


13.344 


VENTRESCA 


THOMAS 


School Department 


4,194 


SALERNO 


HEIDI 


School Department 
• School Department 


13.321 
12.978 


BLUMBERG 


JULIE ANN 


School Depanment 


4.089 
3.803 


FERGUSON 


TODD 


MADGE 


TRACl 


School Department 


PALM 


BONNIE 


School Department 


' 12.574 


NEDROW 


RUTH 


School Department 


3.790 


FOY 


SEAMUS 


School Department 


12.187 


GRAYKEN 


MARY 


School Department 


3.555 


BILODEAU 


CATHY 


School Department 


12.18S 


iWHlLTON 


ANNEMARIE 


School Depanment 


3,551 


SHERIDAN 
RHODES 


M ELIZABETH 


School Department 


12.110 


ILONG 


1 KATHLEEN 


School Department 


3,495 


KATHLEEN 


School Department 


11,870 


BARRETT 


BEVERLY 


School Department 


3.325 


BORLAND 


JULIE 


School Department 


11.376 


1 PARROT 


KENT 


School Department 


3.268 


JOYCE 


MICHELLE 


School Department 


11.283 


BUCKLEY 


PETER 


School Department 


3.268 


BARTELS 
BEATSON 


JACQUELINE 


School Department 


11.210 


HINES 


KATHRYN 


School Department 


3.202 


ELIZABETH 
DEBORAH 


School Department 

School Department 


10.938 


BERGAMESCA 


HEATHER 


School Department 


3.097 
3.028 


BOSTWICK 
WASSERMAN 


10.852 


Imeehan 


ISARA 


School Depanment 


SHARI 


School Department 


I0.6I5| ICOAKLEY 


ABIGAIL 


School Department 


2.913 


D'ELIA 


jJOANNE 


1 School Department 


10.556 


PROZELLER 


MATTHEW 


School Department 


2.913 


HICKEV 


(LAUREL 


School Department 
School Department 
1 School Department 


10.503 
10. n7 


RODGERS 


ROBERT 


School Department 


2.913 


CALABRIA 


MARIA 
HEATHER 


COLEMAN 


CAROLANN 


School Department 


2.821 


TOPOR 


'' 10.064 


CONNERTY 


KARA 


School Depanment 


2.796 
2,719 


MARASCIO 
STAUNTON 


JOSEPHINE 
MARY 


; School Department 


10.022 


CARON 


JO-ELLEN 


School Department 


' School Department 


9.891 


WOOD 


JO-ELLEN 
ALLISON 


School Depanment 
School Department 


2,508 

2.455 


mcarthur 


WILLIAM 


School Department 


9.771 


MOJE 


JACOBUCCI 


EILEEN 


School Department 


9.768 


ILIBBY 


BEN 


School Department 


2.164 


schram page 


LAURA 
DOROTHY 


I School Department 


9.746 


1 BECKER 


ILAURE 


School Department 


2.055 


SNOW 


1 School Department 


9.229 


TOWER 


CHRISTINE 


School Department 


2.007 


SIMMONS 


ILISA 


1 School Department 


9.185 


DUFFY 


IJAMES 


School Department 


1.930 


RYAN 


1 SUSAN 


■ School Department 


8.944 


CANNEY 


IBARBARA 


School Deparmient 


1.705 


COADY 


1 BROOKE 


School Depanment 
1 School Depanment 


8.887 
8.46f 


MCDONALD 


JOANN 'school Department 


L 1.599 
1.575 


TUSCHER 
BENNETT 


ROBERT 


WEATHERS 


HELEN 


School Depanment 

School Department 


PAMELA 


School Department 


8.423 


ICARVIN 
ICANNEY 


:melissa 


1.550 


BRYANT_ _ 
WILFAND 


DORIAN 
: WENDY 


School Department 


8.402 


IKIMBERLY 


School Depanment 


1440 


1 School Department 


l_ 8.350 


IMAREE 
ITRUGLIA 


AMY 


School Department 


1.398 


CURRAN 


1 KRISTIN 


School Department 


8.321 
8.117 


LIDIA 


School Depanment 


1 1.381 


BENEWAY 
DUFFY 


"Maureen 

KATHRYN 


1 School Department 


1 LEWIS 


IMARGARET 


School Depanment 


1.284 
1.112 


School Department 


8.007 


IHENRY-SAFRINBPAMELA 


School Depanment 


TRUGLIA 


SILVANA 


School Depanment 


7,838 


IGIGON 


CARL A 


School Department 


1.061 


GORDON 


JANET 


School Department 


7,443^ 


ANTHONY 


SUSAN 


School Department 


1.040 


sabo 


'jEAN 


' School Department 


7.401 


MURRAY 


RYAN 


School Department 


1.009 


HERNBERG 


1 KATHLEEN 


School Depanment 


6.925 


IGILMAN 


BETH 


School Depanment 


960 


LINDSAY 


RENEE 


1 School Department 


6.710 


|PIZZELL1 


MARY 


School Depanment 


960 


SEELE 


DEBORAH 


; School Department 


6.677 


lOFFERMAN 


ILISA 


School Depanment 


910 


TONER 


PHYLLIS 


' School Depanment 


6.443 


IPROTULIS 


IKARA 


School Department 


874 


COSTA 


DAVID 


School Depanment 


6.408 
6,17T 


ELY 
JOYCE 


FLORENCE 


School Depanment 


855 


MARCELLA 
WILLIAMS 
LEVANGIE 
HARRIS 

Steele' 


IGIUSEPPINA 


, School Depanment 


IMARY 


School Depanment 


833 


ALEXANDRA 


School Dgjanment 


5.704 


MOJE 


1 REBECCA 


School Department 


830 


JOHN 
JOY 


; School Depanment 
School Department 


^ 5.592 
5.558 


GILLIS 
KINGSLAND 


JEFFREY 
SANDRA ^ 


School Department 
School Department 


825 

825 

"806 


JENNIFER 


! School Depanment 


5.547 


MANIFASE 


; STANLEY 


School Department 


GABRIELS 

PARK 

WHITE 


JESSICA^ 
KAREN 
IMARGARET 


School Depanment , 
School Deparmient 


5.457 


ILAWLESS 


ELIZABETH 


School Department 


800 

778 
750 


5.385 


JGRAVES 


JOHN 

1 JEANNE 


School Department 
School Department 


I School Depanment 


5.201 


'MCEACHERN 


VIRGA 


'BENJAMIN 


' School Depanment 


5.127 


fcOHEN 


JANE 


School Department 


741 


SPADEA 


MARIA 


School Depanment 


S.080 


IBUHR 


MEGAN 


School Department 


600 


FEGREUS 


JANE 


; School Depanment 


5.078 


;littauer 


DANIEL 


School Depanment 


600 


MCCABE 


DANA 


School Depanment 


4.9111 


'ANDERSON 


ELIZABETH 


School Department 


525 
525 


DOUCETTE 


NANCY 


School Depanment 


4.885J 


iCAYER 


MICHELLE 


School Department 


DAVIS 


CRAIG 


School Depanment 


4,847 


GUILD 


LYDIA 


School Department 


525 


MCCARTHY 


KATHERINE 


School Depanment 


4,747 


MEADOWS 


MARK 


School Depanment 


525 



139 



WASES AND SALARIES PAID 
CALENDAR YEAR 2005 



Last Namt 


pint Name 


Priman Denartment 


Gross Pav Last Name First Name 


Primarv Department 


Gross Pav 





















1 > 




NATHANSON 


GAIL 


School Deparrment 


525 DOUGLAS MARION 


Town Clerk 


57.016 


BARRY 

BRANDT 


MARGARITA 


School Department 


450 ST PIERRE CAROL 


Town Clerk 


43,846 


ELISABETH 


School Department 


450 FORD EDYTHE 


Town Clerk 


326 


MICHAUD 
WATTS 


MAUREEN^ 

kristen"" 


School Department 
School Department 


450 CHARLES MARGARET 


Town Clerk 


326 


450, VOLUNGIS JUDITH 


Town Clerk 


326 


HAZEN 


-CYNTHIA 


School Depanment 


412] MARLETTE GEORGE 


Town Clerk 


1 


BAUM 


ROBERT 


School Department 


375; 






GARDNER 


LINDSEY 


School Department 


375 


Department Total 


S 101,841 


SCEERY 


HELENE 


School Department 


375 






STURINO 


CARLING 


School Department 


375, LITCHFIELD LINDA 


Treasurer/Collector 


56,187 


HINDLEY 


DIANE 


School Deparrment 


310: MULRAIN KATHLEEN 


Treasurer/Collector 


42.316 


ANDERSON 

WEINTR,AL'B 


ELIZABETH 


School Department 


300 PARNELL SANDRA 


Treasurer/Collector 


26.595 


JANE 


School Department 


300 iDIVITO JOSEPH 


Treasurer/Collector 


14,121 


ROHRER 


KAITLIN 


School Department 


240 1 






COTTER 
KIDDER 


WILLIAM 


School Department 


225 




Department Total 


$ 139,219 


IAN 


School Department 


225 








KING-ALFIERI 


JENNIFER 


School Deparrmeni 


225; 




Grand Total 


$15,826,152 


MERRICK 


JUDITH 


School Department 


2251 








MCNAMARA 


FRANK 


School Department 


201 








ARDIZZONI 


RUTHANN 


School Department 


200 


1 ' 1 


WILFRAND 


ASHLEY 


School Depanment 


160 








BARBER 


SHEILA 


School Depanment 


ISO I 








CICIOTTE 


CAROL 


School Department 


ISO : : 


1 


DELORENZO 


ALLISON 


School Department 


ISO 






HAY 


CHRISTINE 


School Depanment 


ISO! 






NEUNDORf 


CHRISTINA 


School Department 


ISO 


'. . i 




O'BRIEN 


M ALANA 


School Department 


ISO 


1 






KIDDER 


ilAN 


School Department 


75 


1 1 


SULLIVAN 


1 COREY 


School Department 


75 






1 


MONTEIRO 


JOHN 


School Department 


44 




1 1 
















1 






Department Total 


$9,788,145 


1 


1 1 








i ' 


GRIFFIN 


WILLIAM 


Board of Selectmen 


109.013 


1 


1 


1 


NOONAN 


DEVON 


Board of Selectmen 


37,813 


1 


1 


WINN 


ELLEN 


Board of Selectmen 


35,633 


i 


j 


ORAM 


JENNIFER 


Board of Selectmen 


9,970 


1 








KOED 


FRED 


Board of Selectmen 


1,375 


1 




1 


RIPLEY 


iNOEL 


Board of Selecrmen 


1,200 








J 


SULLIVAN 


MICHAEL 


Board of Selectmen 


1,125 


i 






DORMITZER 


RALPH 


Board of Selectmen 


1.000 








SPOFFORD 


ROBERT 


Board of Selectmen 


1,000 








VANDERWEIL 


R GARY 


Board of Selectmen 


667 






1 


WADS WORTH 


DAVID 


Board of Selectmen 


600 t 




t 


MURRAY 


MARY 


Board of Selectmen 


400' J 








LEHR 


ARTHUR 


Board of Selectmen 


350 1 i 




' 


MCMORRIS 


:roseanne 


Board of Selectmen 


333 i ! 














i 








Department Total 


$ 200,479 1 


1 












1 


1 






BUCKLEY 


J MICHAEL 


Town Accountant 


96,733 ■ 


1 


1 


HENDERSON 


JANE 


Town Accountant 


27,244 


i 


1 


FRASER 


KRISTINE 


Tow-n Accountant 


1.969 i J 




J 


















Department Total 


$ 125,946 







140 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



The property tax levy is the revenue a community can raise through real and personal 
property taxes. The property tax levy is the largest source of revenue for the Town of 
Cohasset. The property tax levy for Fiscal Year 2005 was $21,779,397.53 representing 
66% of the 532,617,910.53 budget. The residential share of the levy is 93%, while 
commercial, industrial, and personal property account for 7%. 

It is the responsibility of the Assessors' Office to establish fair market value for all 
properties in the Town of Cohasset. During Fiscal Year 2005, the Assessors' Office 
conducted a full revaluation of the town. The staff conducted an analysis of all arms- 
length sales that occurred in the town during calendar year 2003, reported sales trends in 
this appreciating real estate market, and completely restructured the land valuation tables, 
in preparation of the Department of Revenue review. Patriot Properties, Inc. of Lynn, 
Massachusetts conducted the commercial, industrial and personal property revaluation. 
After extensive review by the Department of Revenue the values were certified for Fiscal 
Year 2005. The total valuation of the town was $2,086,149,189 with a tax rate of $10.44 
per thousand dollars of assessment. 

In addition to the revaluation of real estate, the Assessors' Office is responsible for the 
assessment and commitment of motor vehicle excise and boat excise, betterment 
assessments, and the collection of new growth based on building construction. During 
2005, the staff conducted field inspections of over 400 building permits in the town of 
Cohasset. 

The Board of Assessors would like to acknowledge Deputy Assessor, Mary Quill, 
Assistant Assessor. Debra Krupczak and Administrative Assistant, Ellen Warner for their 
efforts throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mary E. Granville, Chairperson 
Elsa J. Miller, Clerk 
Michael C. Patrolia, Member 



141 



Board of Health Annual Report 2005 

Board membership re-organized in April 2005. Upon re-organization, Peggy S. 
Chapman, RN became the Chairperson; Robin M. Lawrence became the Clerk and 
Stephen N. Bobo became the Member. Joseph R. Godzik, VMD remains as Health 
Agent on a part-time basis with Tara N. Tradd as Office Manager/Health hispector. The 
Public Health Nurse continues to be Judy Fitzsimmons, RN, assisted by Janet Bennett, 
RN and Mary Goodwin, RN. 

The Board has continued its leadership in stormwater issues. The Board hopes to 
inaugurate a volunteer program to augment the DPW efforts in catch-basin management 
and identification in 2006. The Board applied for and received a grant from Mass Coastal 
Zone Management (MCZM) of S60,000 (including in kind support) for James Brook 
Non-point Pollution Source (NPS) Assessment and Remediation Analysis to Formalize 
the structure of a Watershed Academy at the Center for Student Coastal Research and 
establish a qualified and hopefully certified cadre of student and other volunteers to carry 
out a variety of assessment tasks in support of Board of Health stormwater objectives, hi 
addition to structuring a storm structure O&M program with the DPW the activity seeks 
to refine the structure of the student volunteer water quality assessment program carried 
out in previous years to conduct a system of instruction and qualification as an addition to 
the existing summer field program to better prepare students for assessment activities in a 
conceptually new watershed academy. The Board is receiving valuable support in its 
stormwater efforts from two increasingly active committees: the Water Resource 
Committee and the Health of the Harbor Committee. These entities are an example of the 
Town's increasing recognition of the necessity of dealing with stormwater problems. 
Discussions and advice from these committees is an essential component of the entire 
stormwater program. The Board also participates in the Wastewater Study Committee, 
which will advise the Selectmen on best wastewater management options for the Town. 

Water quality testing at Bassing Beach required the closure of the beach for swimming 
for a period during the summer. While no individual test resulted in closure, a prolonged 
period of testing resulted in exceeding a geometric mean, which also requires closure. 
The source of this microbiological pollution is unknown. 

The student volunteer monitoring program being carried out by the High School teachers, 
students and concerned volunteers is a mainstay of an increasingly sophisticated 
assessment of Town water bodies and forms the basis of the Board's continuing program. 
Under Board sponsorship, and using standard methods developed into a quality assurance 
program handbook for Cohasset, the students are able to not only take samples, but to 
conduct analysis of parameters such as fecal coliform, total suspended solids, 
enterococci, salinity, etc. These assessments, paid for by the Cohasset Center for Student 
Coastal Research (CCSCR) are confirmed using split sample techniques with G & L 
Laboratories of Quincy, Ma. Such data are invaluable in assisting the Board planning of 
remediation activities. 



142 



The Board of Health continues to develop an Emergency Plan as an appendix to the 
Town's Emergency Preparedness Plan including Risk Communication and the operation 
of an Emergency Dispensing Site. Funds from the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health were used to train staff in emergency preparedness, smallpox vaccine 
administration, purchase medical supplies and personal protective equipment, develop the 
Emergency Plan and purchase a defibrillator for the library, hi the event of a large-scale 
disaster, such as influenza pandemic, the Board will be seeking approval of a mutual aid 
agreement with the 27 Towns in the Public Health Emergency Preparedness Region. 

The Board of Health held its annual Health Fair at the Second Congregational Church 
50+ citizens participated. There were over 900 immunization participations in the 
Medicare Reimbursement program for flu and pneumonia immunizations. 

The Board continues to work with the School Department on matters pertaining to lead 
and copper in the drinking water, sanitation and air quality in the school buildings and 
advising in the area of distribution. 

The Board is grateful to all who assist with programs and clinics through volunteer 
efforts and monetary donations throughout the year. 



Keep Well Clinics 


172 


Adult Immunization 


1000 


Diabetic / Cholesterol Screening 


50 


Health Fair Participants 


50 


Communicable Disease Follow Up 


16 


Home Nursins Visits 


253 


Office Nursins Visits 


917 


Total Nursins Visits 


1170 



The Board received the following revenue during 2005: 

Licenses and Permits: $15,478.50 

Witnessing Percolation Testing: S 13,358.78 

Disposal System Construction Permit: $ 6,230.00 

Other: $ 5,633.28 

PHN Gift Account $ 793.00 

Medicare Reimbursement $ 9,350.64 

Respectfully Submitted: 
Peggy S. Chapman, RN, CS, Chairperson 
Robin M. Lawrence, DDS, MPH, Clerk 
Stephen N. Bobo, Member 



143 



Cohasset Elder Affairs Annual Report 

Director's Report 
December 31, 2005 

The mission of Cohasset Elder Affairs (CEA) is to enhance the quality of life for all 
citizens of Cohasset who are 60 years of age and older, as mandated by the Older 
American Act. 

The CEA encourages broad-based community involvement in elder affairs. It assists town 
residents approaching age 60 and their families. The CEA also provides information to 
the community to educate them about the increasing numbers and changing needs of the 
senior population. 

Our primary goal is to provide for the physical, social and emotional needs of seniors, 
helping them to lead independent, stimulating and self-reliant lives at home for as long as 
possible, preventing crisis and educating them about available resources. Our second goal 
is to foster intergenerational activities to enhance the lives of our seniors, other citizens 
and children of Cohasset. 

Through our outreach program and senior center, we provide a centralized delivery 
system, a diversity of programs, transportation, facilities and appropriate personnel, both 
professional and volunteer. 

This enables us to provide the best of care for the period of January 1, 2005 - December 
30, 2005 in the following programs and activities: 

• Outreach. Our part-time outreach worker provides a personal link between the Cohasset 
Senior Citizens and the many benefits and services that are available in the community. 

• Information about homecare, transportation, nutrition and fuel assistance 

• Help with applications for Mass Health, food stamps, food pantry, housing and 
pharmacy programs along with being the SHINE worker for Cohasset 

• Referrals to South Shore Home Care, Protective Services, Legal Services and benefits 
programs 

• Advocacy and support for family issues and social needs. 

• SHINE (Sening Health Information Needs of Elders) has been offered in Cohasset 
since the mid-1980s thanks to our former State Senator William Golden. For 10 years 
Cohasset was the lead agency for ten towns and one city (Quincy). Now the headquarters 
is located at HESSCO in Sharon. Carol Barrett attends monthly meetings at these offices 
to be updated on current health insurance information. Carol does an outstanding job at 
offering counseling services to all persons over 60. Health insurance continues to be a 
problem for most people in our area. We are very fortunate to have our own dedicated 



144 



counselor. Carol Barrett, who offers her advice to retired workers along with family 
members who are looking for answers to complex issues on Medicare claim forms, 
Medicare supplements. HMO and senior insurance plans, long-term care insurance, 
Medicaid and various health insurance options. With the uncertainty of Medicare reform, 
our SHINE representative was especially busy and much appreciated this year. 

• AARP and IRS trained volunteers assisted 25 seniors in preparing their federal and state 
income tax forms. 

• Information and Referrals. Trained staff and volunteers answer an average of 50 plus 
phone calls on an average day. The callers request information on assistance on a wide 
spectrum of issues and concerns. Sometimes I think if they don't know who to call they 
call us, and we direct them to the right source! A large portion of the calls we receive are 
requests for transportation. This number has seen a dramatic increase over the last few 
years. Medical calls still remain our top priority! Other calls often need information 
regarding housing, prescription program, care giving, etc. Calls are received from elders 
and non-elders alike. All calls are logged and are treated with courtesy and respect and if 
a caller is required to leave a voicemail message, calls are returned immediately. The 
CEA Director and outreach worker are available days or evenings for emergency 
situations involving an elder. Carol Barrett has set up a telephone reassurance where a 
volunteer contacts a homebound elder daily just to "check in" and hear a human voice. 
The calls are made daily to insure the person is all right, check on their status, inform 
them of services available to them and determine if they need to see Carol. Our staff and 
volunteers are trained to take calls willingly and always make time to listen and offer 
help when needed. 

• Transportation. At present the CEA has two vans and one we share with the town of 
Hingham. We have just learned from the Executive Office of Transportation and 
Construction that Cohasset will be receiving a new 2006 maxivan with raised roof and 
lift. This will replace the 1997 Medical Van and we will also be receiving a new vehicle 
that we will share with Hingham. This Mobility Assistance Program (Federals Section 
5310 funding local towns) has saved the town of Cohasset about $76,000. We are grateful 
to South Shore Elder Services and Ms. Joanne Champa, Program Coordinator of EOTC, 
for all their help through this long process. Ham Tewksbury, Jim Donahue and Jim 
Campbell also need to be recognized and commended for their dedication and tireless 
effort to transport the most critical people to medical treatments and appointments, 

• They are always willing to stop and help with a sick client. We depend greatly on their 
generosity with their time and effort. There are no words to describe how wonderful they 
are and the work they accomplish for Cohasset' s Elder residents. Currently, the town 
funds 19 hours of van driver services a week, but other than that, we depend entirely on 
grants and our wonderful volunteers to carry us through the week and sometimes 
weekend. Without their support our transportation program would not be able to offer the 
many rides both morning and afternoon we now provide to elders in our community. 
Martha Horsefield has done an outstanding job in recruitment, training and retaining the 
best people for volunteers and they are the heart and soul of Cohasset Elder Affairs. 



145 



Martha oversees twelve different categories of volunteers for a total of 140 different 
people. It is truly amazing that she accomplishes so much in such a short period of time 
(she only works part-time). Her team approach that she fosters here at CEA certainly 
seems to be working well. She tells me she works with angels. 

• The "Are you OK?" (RUOK) Program, a service provided by the Norfolk County 
Sheriffs Office, Michael G. Bellotti, Sheriff, in conjunction with Elder Service and the 
Cohasset Police Department continues to be a great comfort to those seniors living alone 
and their families. It is a voluntary sign-up telephone reassurance system that checks the 
well being of senior citizens or people with physical limitations, allowing them to remain 
independent and in their homes. Sheriff Bellotti, Chief Jim Hussey and Pilgrim Bank 
recently made sure that the town of Cohasset will have "Project Lifesaver" for citizens 
with memory loss, dementia, autism or others who "wander off." This is a great service 
and will have a great impact on the caregiver if a person is missing. We also thank Chief 
Hussey for allowing a staff member to attend a weekly session here at the Center with our 
own elders. Her advice is worth millions of dollars! 

• Last October we offered for the first time a Safety Program/Fair with 40 different 
vendors. It was held at the senior center from 10:00 to noon, and afterwards everyone 
walked up to the first parish house for lunch. Our luncheon speaker was from the 
Arthritis exercise program (PACE). The attendance has grown to the point we need a 
larger room and a few men! 

There are many programs offered at Cohasset Elder Affairs designed to keep seniors 
active and vital. These include bridge, book club, introductory Italian, computer classes, 
intergenerational luncheons, lawn raking in the fall with High School Students, foot care, 
blood pressure clinics, hearing clinic, eye glass repairs on site, and Internet computer 
classes with a High School Student. All our programs are designed to exercise the mind 
as well as the body. A sense of belonging and participation in social activities promotes 
well being. We offer luncheons three days a week, with speakers after the Tuesday lunch 
thanks to Margaret Casey. 

All of our special events and trips are planned ahead with Trudy Salerno. She also 
coordinates all the medical appointments. 

Due to popular demand, we have increased the distribution numbers of our monthly 
newsletter Vista. A total of 2,000 copies are printed and available by mail, library, public 
housing, banks. Town Hall and various businesses located throughout the town. The local 
banks have come forward to pay for the printing of Vista with small information ads on 
the back page. Ms. Suzanne Scale has been with us since last February, and she is 
designing a totally new bi-monthly newsletter. 



146 



As Cohasset Elder Affairs remains dedicated to continuing our mission of assisting the 
entire Cohasset community with elder needs. We thank all the town works and officers 
for their continued help and support. 



2,000 

1.800 

1.600 

1,400 

1,200 

1.000 

800 

600 

400 

200 





Cohasset Population Trends 




nO-14 


■ 15-29 


D 30-44 


45-59 


■ 60-74 


n75-plus 



1980 
Census 



1990 
Census 



2000 
Census 



2010 
Projection 



2020 
Projection 



147 



Volunteer Coordinator 

Report for Calendar Year 2005 

January 17, 2006 



The following chart reports on the number of volunteers who served Cohasset Elder 
Affairs in 2005 and the kinds of service they provided to our elderly population. 



Volunteer 
Category 


Total 
Number of 
Volunteers 


Service provided by 
Volunteers 


Comments 


Board of 
Directors 


12 


Board meets 12 times a 
year for approximately 2 
hrs. 


Develop long-range plans for 
CEA; support CEA director & 

staff. 


Van Drivers 


47 


382 trips in '05, including 
30 special events trips 


This figure does not include 
medical trips. 


Kitchen 
Assistants 


31 


145 meals served at Center 
on Tues., Wed.. & Thurs. 
weekly 


Serve approximately 14-15 
per meal. 


Office 

Assistants/ 

Receptionists 


7 


Provide 1,560 hours of 
service (fy '05); plus 1 
college student provides 
data entry service at 
vacation time. 


Handle over 4800 calls per yr; 
make daily calls to home- 
bound residents; assist staff 
with phone ccdls. 


Instructors 


6 


Provide 720 hrs. per year 


Approximately 8-9 per class 


Escort 

Grocery 

Shoppers 


6 


14-16 elders served each 
week. 


Individual shopping is done for 
6 homebound elders. Lists are 
picked up, shopping done, and 
groceries delivered and put 
away. Program coordinated by 
CEA Medical Transportation 
Coordinator. 


Friendly 
Visitors 


^3 


Weekly visits of 1-2 hours 
to homebound elders 


Program coordinated by CEA 
Outreach Coordinator 


Gourmet Club 


10 


Prepare & serve food at 
CEA special events 


Approximately 6 special events 
are held a year with volunteers 
preparing & serxnng food. 


Christmas 
Angels 


24 


hidividually prepared 24 
gift baskets. 


Baskets were delivered to 24 
elders as determined by 
Outreach Coordinator. 


Legal Counsel 


1 


One lawyer provided legal 
advice to 12 elders. 


Approximately one hour per 
the 12 clients. 


CPA Tax 
Preparation 


1 


One CPA prepared state & 
federal tax forms for 12 
elders. 


A total of approximately 15 
hours was volunteered for the 
12 clients. 



148 



Voluuteei Cate- 
goiy 


Total Number 
of X'olunteers 


Senice pro\ided by \'olun- 
teers 


Coinmeuts 


Students, 

Girl Scouts. 
Cub Scouts, 

Fall Cleanup 
\'olnnte*rs. 

Student Com- 
puter Expeit 


62 


1 Weekly visits to Harborviev.' 
residents during school year. 
2. Cohasset high school students 
inter\'iewed & wrote reports on 
selected local residents. 
3 Scouts created holiday deco- 
rauoas. 

4. Ten Cohasset school students 
and their families did lav^n rak- 
ing in the Fall for elders. 

5 Cohasset High School Junior 
teaches elders word processing, 
access to uitemet and e-mail. 


J. Norre Dame Academ comnumln' 
sanlce program. 

2. Tliree Cohasset high school stu- 
dents did "iMng htstor\> " based on 
Interviews Mith 4 local residents. 

3. Local scout troops provide holi- 
day' decorations at the senior center 
for each major holiday. 

4. Seniors needing yard cleanup & 
other light outdoor yvork were as- 
sisted by these smdents t& families. 

5 The student has provided this one- 
on-one service for 6 years for ap- 
proximately 2 hrs. weekly during 9- 
month period. 


Local Facilities 


5 


Three Church Partsh Centers, 
the Lightkeepers House, and 
South Shore Communir,' Center 
(SSCQ 


Local churches & Lightkeepers 
House, provide free of charge, the 
means for CEA to hold educational 
& social extents in their facilities 
The CEA rents office space from 
SSCC at $] 4,000 pel' year. In turn. 
SSCC provides $44,000 of In-kind 
value to CEA per rear. 


Local Coffee 
Shop 


1 


Donates approxunately S50.00 
of food, coffee each week. 


These food Items augment the weekly 
congregate meals & are used at 
other CE4. social and educational 
programs. 



These 216 volunteers including local facilities and businesses are crucial to the quality 
and quantity of services provided by Cohasset Elder Affairs. The drivers transport our 
elders to local banks, grocery stores, the post office, the voting polls, and to and from our 
tri-weekly congregate meals at the Center, to name some of the kinds of trips we offer. 
The grocery shoppers are a life-line to those who are homebound and cannot shop for 
themselves. Our kitchen assistants and office assistants provide invaluable services to our 
programs. The other categories described above are of equal value to Cohasset Elder 
Affairs because they enable us to enrich and expand our services and programs. 

Maltha Horsefield, Volunteer Coordinator 
Volunteer Category 



149 



MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION UPDATE 

Cohasset Elder Affairs provides transportation for Cohasset seniors, to many varied 
events and destinations. As the number of seniors increases so do the requests and we 
have to prioritize with medical transportation at the top of our list. What appears to be a 
simple process; call for a ride and it is provided but, more often it is much more. Some 
clients have hearing or vision problems and it is not unusual for the client to have the 
wrong time or date of appointment. We try to confirm the information by calling the 
doctor's office to coordinate a good time for their ride to the appointment. 

An older woman, living alone, was evaluated by the outreach coordinator who 
determined she would have extended transportation needs. She was added to the medical 
transportation calendar. After a few weeks she was called to ask how things were 
working out and if her appointments were to continue wit the same time and days weekly. 
My calls were not returned, and when speaking with the medical van driver I leaned she 
told Ham she would not be taking the van, or the RIDE, and indeed had driven herself 
one morning. We were both concerned and I passed this information on to Carol who 
followed up by speaking with the doctor's office. They were unaware of it and would 
address it with the patient. This is just an example of how our network within the CEA is 
able to give attention to clients and address their concerns when they have no other 
source for assistance. 

ESCORT SHOPPING AND LUNCHES AT CEA 

Food shopping is our next priority. Those who are able to ride the van, those who are 
housebound make a list and our volunteers pick it up, shop for them and bring their 
orders to homes. Also lunch at the Center three times per week is important to keep 
people who do not drive comiected with their peers as well as providing a nourishing 
meal. 

A summer resident called CEA for help when her car was in for extensive repairs. She 
had no way of getting to the grocery store. She was added to our Tuesday trip to Shaws. 
At the end of August she called to say "thank you" and tell us how grateful she was for 
our assistance. She said when she spoke with her family they could not believe all that 
CEA provides for the seniors; they all attend their local COA's and have nothing like 
Cohasset. 

OTHER TOWNS-VAN TRANSPORTATION 

We received copies monthly of Newsletters for local towns and in the past several 
months have noticed an increased number that are charging fees for van rides (due in 
most part to the increase in cost of gas). Other vans operate per ride on a donation basis. 
Some rely solely on grants and donations. They require at least 4 to 6 people in order for 
a trip to run with a minimum of 24 to 48 hours notice, and a weeks notice for medical 
rides (except emergencies). One town reminds people they are not a taxi service and need 
requests to be made in advance! 



150 



MEDICAL VAN TRANSPORTATION 
JULY 1, 2004 TO June 30, 2005 

Medical Appointments in Town of Cohasset 35 

Medical appointments out of town 94 

Braintree. Brookline, Hanover. Hingham 
Hull, Scituate, Weymouth, Quincy 

Physical Therapy Hingham (32) Hanover(31) 63 

Aduh Day Care - Quincy 217 

Vision Center, Stroke Club, Foot Care, MDC 38 

Multiple seniors on each trip 

Transportation provided by SSCA arranged by CEA 16 

Escort Shopping (volunteer escorts) weekly for seniors 8 per needing assistance. 

Shopping for shut-ins (pick up list & deliver groceries) 3 per 

Transportation is also provided for Health Fairs, Health Seminars @ CEA, Safety Fair @ 
CEA, AARP Senior Driving Program, lunch @ the Center three day per week. Special 
events Valentine Tea Party, St. Patrick's Luncheon, 80+ Birthday Luncheon, end of 
Summer Picnic. Sheriffs Picnic, Thanksgiving Luncheon, Christmas Party, River Bay 
Club safety, luncheon & entertainment programs, lunch @ Cohasset HS, lunch at Sunrise 
Adult assisted living, the Paul Pratt Library for "Meet the Author" programs, out of town 
trips to the JFK Library, Massasoit CC Concerts, rides to voting poll and Flu short, and 
informative update on Medicare. These programs are provided with little or no personal 
cost to our seniors, and provide them with useful knowledge and companionship of their 
peers. 



15; 



Medical Van Transportation Report 
January 1 - December 31, 2005 

Medical transportation is available to Cohasset residents 60 and older. Daily 

transportation, within a radius of 15 miles, is provided Monday thru Friday, with the 

exception of Holidays. 

Destinations Number of Trips 

Adult Health Day Care 208 

Anderson Physical Therapy 26 

Doctor visits - Weymouth 79 

Driftway Medical/Scituate 8 

Eye Health 3 

Flu shot clinic 1 

Foot Care/Cohasset 8 

Health Fairs/Seminars 2 

Hull Medical Center 7 

MDC - water aerobics 4 

Old Colony 20 

Post Physical Therapy 26 

Quincy Medical Center 5 

S.S. Family Practice & local doctors 67 

South Shore Hospital 9 

South Shore Medical Center 2 

Stroke Club - Hingham COA 2 

Vision Center - Hingham COA 10 

Total Trips: 487 Clients Served: 48 

The first priority of the Medical Van is to transport anyone in need of transportation for 
health reasons. When available, it is also used for large programs/functions such as the 
Valentine Tea Party, St. Patrick's Day luncheon, the 80-90 Birthday for all seniors in 
Cohasset, the Thanksgiving luncheon, and Health related programs such as the Medicare 
"Plan D" Seminar in December. 

Medical trips beyond our service area or those that the Medical Van is unable to 
accommodate are referred to and coordinated by CEA with the South Shore Action 
Council. 



South Shore Action Council 


Number of Trips 


Clients 


Beth Israel Hospital 


1 


1 


Boston Imaging 


2 


2 


Driftway Medical 


5 


5 


Eye Health 


1 


1 


Faulkner Hospital 


2 


2 


Mass General Hospital 


1 


1 


New England Medical Center 


1 


1 


Old Colony-Libby Ind Pkwy 


1 


1 


South Shore Gastro 


2 


2 


South Shore Hospital 


3 


3 



152 



South Shore Medical 1 1 

V.A. Hospital 1 1 

Weymouth Doctor Visits 18 18 

Total Trips: 39 Clients: 39 

Programs & Trips being considered for the Winter Season 

December 1 3th MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE - Upcoming programs 
including the popular Holiday concert 12/13/05. 

The offer programs every Thursday l-3pm at the Senior Center Humanities which might 
be of interest to our seniors. List available. 

New members are always welcome to join the MCC senior chorus. Rehearsals are held 
on Wednesdays l-3pm in the fine arts building. 

A.C. MOORE -New store at the Hanover Mall has been contacted we asked if they 
would consider giving a demonstration at CEA for al fall arrangement for the seniors. 
They said as soon as they have all their instructors in place we can set a date. Will get 
back to us. 

NOVEMBER 10: VETERANS DAY is on a Friday. Do we want a Breakfast for might 
we have a brunch/lunch? Our regular serving day, we have asked all Veterans to 
send/drop off a picture of themselves in uniform during their service years. We will 
display them at the center and see how many can be identified (and maybe have a 
contest.) Also it might be a nice idea for our vets to write a letter or a card to a 
serviceman/woman in our present day armed forces overseas. We could supply the 
materials and see to their mailing. 

(The local veterans contact may be of help with addresses) St A's has a list of local 
service men/women now serving our country) I will send info the Mariner and other 
publications. 

OCTOBER 10 :COLUMBUS DAY (WE ARE CLOSED FOR THE HOLIDAY) Can we 

combine it with the program on October 1 1 "The Healing Effects of Herbs and Teas. 

If herbs and teas create enough interest, we can ask Jennifer from Home Instead Senior 
Care to come again and show us the best way to grow an indoor herb garden. 

Geneology has become a hobby for a large part of our population and we are in contact 
with Jack Murray, a teacher at UMass and former president of the Geneology Society 
who is willing to give classes here at CEA. No date has been set as of yet. 

INVITING AUTHOR(S) to DISCUSS THEIR BOOK and maybe combine with a light 
lunch. 



153 



Donald Angell - "Where Somebody Waits for Me" Re: the great depression 

Leslie Silvia - " Once Upon an Island" RE: Life on Peddocks Island 

And other authors that may be recommended -Martha heard the author of "The Other 

Perfect Storm" by Michael Touglas @ the Hull Lifesaving Museum- perhaps we could 

get him to come to CEA museum 



The James Library and Center for the Arts is offering some very interesting programs for 
the fallAVinter program season. List will be on the bulletin board in the Keating room. 

TRIP TO SOUTH SHORE VO TECH for lunch and/or the beauty salon (if enough 
interest in either) can be planned. 

ANTIQUE APPRAISALS @ CEA, TBA MARTHA IS WORKING ON THIS @ 

TRIP TO HANOVER MALL could include Trader Joe's Market and Panera Bread for 
lunch. (Do you think it might generate more interest?) 

MOHEGAN SUN / HOLIDAY CABARET, Dec 6. This day-long trip includes round- 
trip motor coach transportation, casino pack including a lunch voucher and a holiday 
cabaret extravaganza at the Grand Arts Theatre. Snacks will be provided on the trip 
home. This trip is being shared with the Scituate CO A and cost is $65. 

JAN 2006 Ann and John Murphy spoke with Ann and she will send a package to CEA 
cost is normally $500 but they will give 50% off to senior centers. Week of 1/16/06 looks 
good if it is decided to go ahead wit this. To be discussed: If we can hold in larger place 
maybe we could get a larger group. 



OUTREACH PROGRAM 
January 1, 2005-December 31, 2005 

The Cohasset Elder Affairs Outreach Program aims to enhance the quality of life for all 
citizens of Cohasset who are 60 years old and older through program development, home 
visits, articles in the Vista and telephone consultations with the elder and/or the caregiver 
and other family members. Presently, there are two grants through South Shore Elder 
Services that support our Respite and Helping Older Adults take a more Active Role in 
their Health Care Programs. In addition, SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Information 
Needs for Elders) counseling is available and applications for Fuel Assistance Handicap 
Plate, The Ride, Medicaid, Prescription Advantage, Hospital Free Care, Food Stamps, 
Homestead Act, and Are you O.K. and counseling is provided for our citizens. 

The File of Life , Health Care Proxy and CEA. state and federal resources are reviewed 
with each first encounter with the elder. The above programs are mentioned as 
appropriate and SSES services are referred as necessary or indicated. November and 
December were especially busy in helping clients with Medicare Part D. 



154 



The following programs are identified with the number of participants, contacts per week 
and total for the 12 months: 



PROGRAM 

Escorted grocery 

Shopping two days -Weekly 



PARTICIPANTS TOTAL FOR January 1 , 2005 to 

December 3 1,2005 



Friendly Telephone Call/daily when 
Opened 



CaseMgmtHome Visits/Telephone 
Health Benefits Counseling 
Legal / Tax Consultation 
Medicare Part D Education 
Support /MH 
Protective Services 
Referrals 
Fuel Assistance 



6-9 



10-15/day 

Respite Worker Program 5/2hours/week 5/2hours/week 
New Clients 



20 

92 

100 

18 

300 

30 

12 

40 

6 



432 

2400 
480 
20 
1438 
200 
18 
300 
620 
12 
60 
6 



155 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Cohasset Housing Authority is a public agency with a five member Board of 
Commissioners, four of whom stand for town election and the Governor appoints the 
remaining Commissioner. 

Commissioner Term Expires 

John D. Muncey, Chairman 2006 

Christopher Allen, Vice Chairman 2009 

Ann C. Barrett, Treasurer 2008 

Ralph Perroncello, Asst. Treasurer 2007 

Helen C. Nothnagle Governor's Appointee 

The Cohasset Housing Authority has a staff of two: 

Catherine M. Luna, Execu-Tech Consultant 
Jill Rosano, Maintenance Supervisor 

According to their bylaws, the Board of Commissioners meets on the fourth Wednesday 
of each month and holds its annual meeting in June. 

Cohasset' s subsidized housing inventory includes 64 state units of Chapter 667 
Elderly/Disabled housing located at Harborview, 60 Elm Street and 12 units of Chapter 
689 Special Needs housing located at 72, 74 and 76 Elm Street. The Department of 
Housing and Community Development subsidizes these 76 state units. Our annual 
subsidies are granted upon successful annual, semi-annual, and quarterly reviews of 
management and regulatory compliance. 

Eligibility standards for Harborview include a maximum allowable income of S46.300 
for one person and the age for admission is 60. At the present time there is a waiting list 
of 50, many of whom are Cohasset residents. Local residents under state law have a 
preference on our Wait List. "Local Preference" as defined by state law is "any applicant 
living and/or working in the Town". The Board of Commissioners recommends that 
application for subsidized housing at Harborview be made before the need becomes 
critical. There is approximately a one-year wait for an apartment for a local resident and 
longer for a non-resident. 

Modernization grants for capital improvements are awarded by our funding source, the 
Department of Housing & Community Development. Grants that have been approved are 
waiting for funding to begin. A bond issue is expected to be introduced by the 
Department to fund projects in the pipeline. Funding has been an issue, specifically the 
fact that the Department had not forwarded funding for utilities to many Housing 
Authorities. The annual subsidy for 2005 arrived at the Cohasset Housing Authority in 
September, which allowed the Authority to pay all outstanding invoices at that time. 



156 



However that is a temporary fix and the Massachusetts Chapter of the National 
Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials, has recommended that we alert our 
municipalities and legislatures as to the severe budget crisis that exist in public housing 
today. 

In unprecedented consideration, the Community Preservation Committee entertained 
requests from the Cohasset Housing Authority in the form of needed capital 
improvements. Money from the CPC has funded new intercom/secure door system, 
refrigerators, stoves, lever door handles, water- saver commodes, water-saver 
showerheads and a number of water heaters. This year the town, upon the 
recommendation of the CPC, has awarded the Authority $400,000 in CPC funds towards 
replacing the envelope of the buildings at Harborview. Our deepest gratitude to Taffy 
Nothnagle initiating the process and presenting the application; to the CPC for their 
thoughtful and generous consideration of our needs; to the Selectmen and the Advisory 
Committee for their encouraging support in placing this issue on the Town Meeting 
warrant; and to the citizens attending Town Meeting. Their support in approving the 
requests honors our senior citizens and enhances their quality of life here at Harborview. 

The State's proposed budget reduces Housing Authority operating dollars for the fourth 
year in a row. We continue to request emergency funding for our complex, as weather 
and time take their toll. We have submitted a budget to the Department of Housing and 
Community Development that indicates our needs which is far greater than the amount 
the State allows. 

We submitted a Condition Assessment Report (our primary vehicle for grants awarded 
for Capital Improvements) requesting siding, windows and doors for the building 
envelope and it was approved. The Department of Housing and Community Development 
has set a budget of 5800,000 to accomplish this task, the $800,000 includes the $400,000 
in CPC funds awarded the Authority. The work has begun; the project should be out to 
bid in the year 2006. 

2005 proved to be a year of transition for the Authority. Marilyn Leblanc, Executive 
Director retired after 1 1 years of excellent service to the Cohasset Housing Authority and 
we wish her Health and Happiness in her retirement. The Board of Commissioners chose 
to hire a Consulting firm to run the Authority, the Execu-Tech Consultants and Catherine 
Luna has been the firm's associate that is administering the Agency. 

Our continued gratitude to the Public Works, Police and Fire Departments for their 
continued generosity, insuring the safety of our residents; to the students from Notre 
Dame Academy, the Girl Scout and Brownie troops for always remembering us. We 
thank you. 



157 



The Board of Commissioners continues to pursue its mandate of providing affordable, 
safe, and secure housing and of reviewing and updating regulatory policies/procedures. It 
remains diligent in the research of opportunities to create affordable housing for those 
with the greatest need. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John D. Muncey, Chairman 

Christopher Allen, Vice-Chairman 

Ann C. Barrett, Treasurer 

Ralph Perroncello, Assistant Treasurer 

Helen C. Nothnagle, Governor's Appointee 



158 



Town Report 
Building Department 
2005 

In 2005, the Building Department issued 420 building permits for almost 34 
million dollars of new construction, which is 10 million dollars more than the previous 
year. 

Nine permits were issued for dwellings at the new Cedarmere Development, six 
were for other new construction and in what is a growing trend, eight permits were issued 
for demolition and re-construction. Hundreds more were for additions and substantial 
renovations. 

In addition to permitting and inspecting these projects, the Building 
Commissioner inspects and certifies the safety of all public buildings and places of 
assembly, and seals all measuring devices as the Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Building Department Activity for 2005: 

Estimated Cost of Construction for permits 420 33,691,915. 

Building Permit Fees Collected 215,666. 

Certificate of Inspections 12 755. 

Zoning By Laws and Maps 266. 

Copy Machine (.20 per page) 38. 

Occupancy Permits 22 550. 



Plumbing Permits 234 14,363. 

Gas Permits 184 5,399. 

Weights & Measures 22 1,321. 

As always, I would like to thank all of the departments, boards and commissions 
for their continued assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert M. Egan 

Building Commissioner 

Zoning Officer 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



159 



Planning Board 2005 Annual Report 

The Cohasset Planning Board, under the authority granted by Massachusetts General 
Law. Chapter 41, Section 81 A-GG (Planning and Subdivision Control Law), and Chapter 
40A (the Zoning Act) is charged with the review of large homes, subdivisions and site 
plan review of various development projects, hi addition to these duties the Board 
completed a number of additional planning tasks in 2005. 

The Board conducted hearings on a number of Zoning Articles. Five (5) zoning articles 
were presented to the Planning Board via citizen's petitions for the Annual Town 
Meeting. These zoning articles included: scenic roads, earth removal, demolition delay, 
and amendments to Section 8 and to the Large Home Review bylaw. Of the proposed 
zoning articles and amendments, the scenic road article was withdrawn and the remaining 
four were NOT voted favorably by Town Meeting. Public hearings were conducted for 
three zoning articles for the December Special Town Meeting to amend Section 5.4, 
Section 5.3.1 and Section 7.2 of the Zoning Bylaws to allow: the Planning Board more 
flexibility/creative design when reviewing multi-use projects in the Downtown Business 
District; dwellings for more than one family to be constructed in the Downtown Business 
District in conjunction with other business uses in the same building: striking the 40,000 
SF or greater requirement in the Downtown Business District; and, to allow the Planning 
Board to take into account available public parking in the Downtown Business area when 
determining the required number of on-site parking spaces that will be required for any 
individual project. These amendments were withdrawn prior to Town Meeting. 

Three subdivision applications were addressed by the Planning Board in 2005. The 
Board completed the review of the 14-lot "Highland Estates" subdivision project located 
along Beech wood Street in the vicinity of Mealy' s Pond, filed by Anthony Nader in early 
September 2004. This project was approved with conditions including permanent 
drainage and grading easements to govern future construction that might alter approved 
drainage patterns. A preliminary subdivision application for "Scituate Hill" was 
reviewed and approved for the creation of four (4) 80.000 SF lots for likely warehouse 
and/or office/retail development at 215 CJC Highway between Sunrise Assisted Living 
and the Brass Kettle Office Building. Subsequently, a Definitive Subdivision application 
was submitted in December 2005 with review and public hearings to begin in January 
2006. Last. re\iew and public hearings were begun for a Definitive Subdivision 
application submitted by King Taylor Cohasset LLC for the construction of five (5) new 
homes on 40.000 to 80.000 SF lots on Castle Road/215 South Main Street. This property 
is bordered by Mendel Road, 100 Pond Street and the Cedarmere site on Beechwood 
Street and plans a second access through Cedarmere. 



160 



The Board held public hearings on eleven (11) large home reviews on nine (9) different 
properties (one application was denied twice and approved on the third submission). 
Several of the projects were quite complicated, including the need to address abutters 
input and concerns regarding blasting, two year construction plans etc. The Board was 
able to hear this input, and request such items as the submission of blasting plans, 
construction protocols, schedules of meetings with abutters and incorporate these items 
into their written recommendation to the Building Inspector. The larger than expected 
number of large home review submissions and, the complexity of some submissions 
prompted the Planning Board to amend the fee and deposit schedule to more accurately 
reflect the time required to process and review these submissions. The Board also 
realized the need to amend some of the procedures and regulations for the administration 
of this bylaw and to clarify its responsibility regarding the concept of "non-harmonious" 
and "injurious" to the existing neighborhood relative to large home construction. 
Ultimately, the large home reviews were very productive, resulting in the approval of all 
large home review applications. 

The Board reviewed and approved with conditions two site plans that included the 
renovation of Motif #1 at 82 Border Street and, the construction of a 9600 SF commercial 
building consisting of 8 bays for rental to small, individual contractors at 2 Smith Place, 
Review began and public hearings were opened for a third site plan application for the 
construction of a new 6000 SF retail and warehouse facility as an expansion of the 
existing Joseph's Hardware retail business on CJC Highway. This site plan review will 
continue into 2006. 

A substantial amount of attention was focused on the continued review of the status of 
conditions and progress of projects approved in the previous year including: the new 
restaurant and Dunkin Donuts drive-thru at 154/156 King Street; the approved expansion 
of DiNero's restaurant on Hull Street; Ox Pasture Lane Subdivision on Beechwood 
Street; and, the 104 unit Cedarmere Senior Multi-family Residence Development on 
Beechwood Street. 

The Board continued its review of the Master Plan as drafted by the Growth and 
Development Committee. Once the Board finalizes its review, a public hearing will be 
advertised to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on a final version of the 
document. 

Additionally, by way of participation on the Planning Board and on other committees, the 
Planning Board: was involved in Cook Estate planning/discussion; initiated the 
Downtown Village Forum to discuss the Village District Plan and subsequently 
reactivated the Zoning Advisory Committee to address rezoning the Downtown Village 
area; began examination of the use of the one ( 1 ) acre parcel behind the Red Lion Inn for 
parking; and, initiated steps for a Route 3A Traffic Study. 



161 



In this extremely busy year, the Board also conducted the following regular business: 

• Held 30 meetings 

• Reviewed 13 subdivision approval not required applications or "Form A's," 
approving 12 and accepting one withdrawal request from the applicant. 

• Reviewed and offered recommendations on 37 special permit or variance 
applications before the Zoning Board of Appeals 

• Review and implementation of minor changes to the SMROD Special Permit 
Rules and Regulations 



Respectfully submitted, 

Alfred S. Moore, Chairperson 
Peter J. Pratt, Vice Chairperson 
Stuart W. Ivimey, Clerk 
Robert H. Sturdy 
Michael R. Westcott 



162 



ANNUAL REPORT - 2005 

COHASSET CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The Cohasset Conservation Commission reviewed twenty-three Requests for 
Determination of Applicability (RDA's), and sixty-six Notices of Intent during 2005. We 
also considered a number of After-the-Fact Notices of hitent and RDA's for people who 
were out of compliance with the Wetlands Protection Bylaw. Furthermore, we made 
many site visits to view project applications first-hand. Several projects required 
particular attention and review, due primarily to their scale and potential environmental 
impacts, including Cedarmere, and the adjoining 14 home subdivision proposed by 
Anthony Nader. 

We worked with the Sandy Beach Association and the Community Preservation 
Committee on the funding and implementation of a beach management plan for Sandy 
Beach. 

Deborah Cook resigned as chairman in September, and David Farrag was elected the new 
chairman. Associate Richard Karoff and Alix White were appointed to the Commission, 
upon the resignation of Jeffrey Waal and James Dedes 

Respectfully submitted, 

David H. Farrag, Chairman 
Sarah E. Charron 
Deborah S. Cook 
Edward S. Graham, Jr. 
Richard M. Karoff 
Veneta P. Roebuck 



163 



SOUTH SHORE RECYCLING COOPERATIVE 
DECEMBER 31, 2005 

The Town of Cohasset is a member of the South Shore Recycling Cooperative (SSRC), a 
voluntary association of fifteen South Shore towns established by hitermunicipal 
Agreement (IMA) and Special Legislation in 1998. Members of the SSRC are: Abington, 
Cohasset, Duxbury, Hanover, Hingham, Holbrook, Hull, Kingston, Marshfield, Norwell, 
Plymouth, Rockland, Scituate, Weymouth, and Whitman. 

Each member town is represented by town associates appointed by the Selectmen. 
Cohasset is represented by Merle Brown and Arthur Lehr. 

The mission of the SSRC as stated in the IMA is: "to provide a forum of cooperative 
management of solid waste by members, to assist each member Town to improve the 
cost-effectiveness of their recycling efforts by providing eco-nomy of scale while 
maintaining full control over solid waste management; to assist members to improve 
programs to divert waste materials from the waste stream and to reduce the amount and 
toxicity of wastes; and to provide such assistance on an individual basis to each member 
Town and cooperatively in joint programs with other Towns." 

Each member town pays an annual membership fee of $4,000. In 2005 the SSRC raised 
a total of $60,000 through these fees, which the SSRC supplemented with $14,259.03 in 
grants from Mass. Dept. of Environmental Protection and Covanta at SEMASS. Those 
funds pay for the services of the Executive Director and support various solid waste and 
recycling activities during the year to benefit member towns. The SSRC estimates that in 
2005 these activities saved member towns an estimated $112,000, and provided over 
250 hours of direct services to the towns. 

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS PRODUCT COLLECTIONS: By using the regional 
contract negotiated by the SSRC with Clean Harbors for the collection and disposal of 
household hazardous products. Member Towns paid about 30% less than the State 
contract, and avoided the administrative time to bid and schedule them. The thirteen 
collections held in 2005 2,439 residents attended, and Member Towns saved 
approximately $28,400 for this service. The contract also enabled 101 residents and 
businesses to attend other Member towns' collections using the reciprocal arrangement, 
which is administered by the Executive Director. The SSRC publicized the events with 
several thousand flyers delivered to the town halls and libraries and ongoing press 
releases in all local papers, on cable TV and the radio. The Executive Director 
attended and helped run ten of the collections, handed out paint stirrers with cost saving 
instructions on latex paint disposal, provided signs and calculated the proper billing for 
the vendor to ensure that discounts and allowances were credited and visitors billed 
properly. 

CONSTRUCTION AND BULKY WASTE. By using the arrangement negotiated by 
the SSRC with the Bourne ISWMF. Member Towns enjoyed a disposal rate of S70/ton 
for construction and bulky waste. The gate fee is $75/ton. With a generation of 7,965 
tons, Member Towns saved $39,825 in CY05 with this arrangement. 

MATTRESSES. The SSRC conducted an RFQ for mattress processing when the 
surcharge at Bourne increased from $10 to $15 each plus the tip fee and transportation, 
coupled with the elimination of the 10 mattress/load allowance. Three companies 



164 



responded, and the SSRC accepted an offer by Miller Recycling in Plainville to transport 
and process mattresses for $14/each, including container rental. This arrangement saved 
the three participating towns approximately $7,400 on the 1,852 mattresses they collected 
in 2005. 

WASTE OIL. The SSRC negotiated a 7-lOe/gal rebate from Cyn Environmental for 
waste oil. Towns had previously received nothing from either Clean Harbors or Cyn. 
This should have generated $5,000 for Member Towns for the six months it was in effect 
in 2005. Exact figures were not available. 

COMPOST AND BRUSH PROCESSING. The SSRC re-bid its contracts for brush 
grinding and compost screening, which were awarded to Letoumeau Corp. and Lion's 
Head Organics. The contractors made presentations at a Board meeting, and the 
contracts were used by several of our towns in CY05. 

THERMOMETER SWAPS. The SSRC assisted the thirteen member towns that have 
contracts with SEMASS to maximize their benefits from the Material Separation Plan 
(MSP), including the provision by SEMASS of digital thermometers for exchange, 
Dunkin Donuts coupons as incentive for residents and contractors to turn in mercury 
thermostats, reimbursement for mercury disposal costs, and outreach assistance (HHP 
flyers, radio ads) valued at approximately $9,780. These programs removed 121 lbs. of 
mercury from the waste stream in 2005. 

RADIO ADS. The SSRC produced sixteen radio ads promoting recycling and waste 
reduction, which were broadcast over 500 times on WATD 95.9 fm (Marshfield), 
WPLM 99.1 fm (Plymouth) and WJDA 1300 am (Quincy) from April through 
December. The SSRC obtained grant funding from Mass. DEP for the spring ads, 
sponsorship from Covanta at SEMASS to cover 1/3 of the airtime cost for the fall ads. 
We also partnered with the North and South River Watershed Association for reduced 
airtime costs on WATD. Total cost was $9,540. 

EVENT RECYCLING. With assistance from the Mass. DEP and the Town of 
Marshfield, the SSRC worked with event organizers to continue event recycling 
programs at the Marshfield Fair. While public education was the main benefit, five 
tons of material was also diverted from the trash for recycling. Recycling containers 
from a previous grant are available for loan to all Member Town events. 

LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST. The SSRC held a Legislative Breakfast in April at 
which Rep. Kathleen Teahan (D- Whitman) was recognized with our "Environmental 
Hero" award for her sponsorship and support of bills and budget items that promote 
waste reduction. Sen. Robert Hedlund (R-Weymouth) also spoke at the event. 

ADVOCACY. The Executive Director led advocacy efforts for State budget items that 
benefit municipal solid waste programs. She met with the Senate Ways and Means 
Environmental Policy Analyst to advise on state and local solid waste issues and budget 
concerns. She also attended policy meetings, forums and conferences hosted by the DEP, 
Solid Waste Association of North America, the Council of SEMASS Communities, the 
Mass. Recycling Coalition, and the Northeast Resource Recovery Association. In her 
capacity as President of MassRecycle, she was appointed to and attends Mass. DEP 
Solid Waste Advisory Committee meetings. She shares what she learns with the 
Managers, and relays the Managers' concerns to the professional and State organizations 
and regulators. 



165 



WEBSITE, ssrc.info provides town-specific recycling information, household 
hazardous product collection information, press releases, Business Partnership 
information, links to other sites, annual reports and the newsletter. 

ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE. The Executive Director's help is frequently sought by 
the solid waste managers on such issues as curbside contracting, disposal of special 
wastes, alternative vendors for different materials, regulations and accessing grants. She 
met with the solid waste managers from each town to stay up to date on their 
programs, update them on current trends, and advise on specific needs each town had. 
She made presentations to Whitman and Marshfield officials and residents about 
PAYT, helped Rockland and Marshfield negotiate better disposal contracts, and 
assisted Mass.DEP in hiring Municipal Assistance Coordinator Rosemary Nolan. 

QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER. The SSRC publishes a newsletter filled with 
information of immediate interest to the South Shore solid waste community, including 
local solid waste news, regulatory and legislative proposals, meetings and seminars. The 
newsletter is circulated to over 300 town officials, legislators, regulators and volunteers, 
and is posted online at ssrc.info. 

PUBLIC OUTREACH. The SSRC releases articles and provides information to the 
local press about waste reduction and recycling, and the proper disposal of hazardous 
waste. The Executive Director also fielded 75 calls from Member Towns' residents in 
CY05 to answer questions, mostly about HHP and CRT disposal. 

MONTHLY MEETINGS. The SSRC provides valuable networking opportunities 

and information sharing at our well-attended Solid Waste Manager meetings, at which 
solid waste collection, disposal and recycling service, pricing and proposed laws and 
regulations are discussed among member towns. Guest speakers provide information on 
subjects of interest to the local MSW community, including special waste disposal, 
regulatory compliance, legislative and budget issues, and grant assistance. 

The SSRC exists to serve its member towns by facilitating their solid waste disposal and 
recycling functions. It always welcomes suggestions on how it can better serve its 
Members. 



166 



Alternative Energy Committee 
Cohasset, MA 

Spring Report to Town Manager 
January 2006 



Committee Formed 

At the request of Merle Brown of the Cohasset Advisory Committee, the Town of 
Cohasset Board of Selectmen formed a committee to investigate the potential for 
conserving energy in Cohasset and for alternative means of generating energy. 
Merle's concerns included both the rising cost of energy and the ongoing 
environmental damage caused by conventional methods of producing electricity 
and heat. Merle mentioned the idea of Cohasset having a wind turbine like Hull's 
Wind 1. 

The committee met for the first time on 17Aug05. The committee has met 
monthly since August, normally on the 3'^'^ Tuesday of the month from 7:30 - 
9:00pm. 

Committee Members 

Jim Shipsky 
Rod Hobson 
Mimi White 
Mike Bliss 
Luciano Lauretti 
Alfred Slanetz 
Andrew Willard 
Robert Kinscherf 

Committee's Goals 

• Our primary goals have been to review, investigate and propose sources for 
alternative energy. 



Committee's Investigation has included 

• Demand - Usage of energy 

■ Where is our usage greatest 

• Supply - Production of energy 
Wind 
Solar 
Biogas 

Water turbines 
Possible locations for power plants 



167 



■ Town owed power plants vs. non-town owed 

• Current Law 

■ What local, state, federal laws are in place that could have a 
positive or negative impact on the ability of the town or its citizens 
to provide/build renewable energy systems? 

Committee actions to date 

Over the past six months the committee has met with several individuals to better 
educate ourselves. Our invited guests have included: 

Brian Adams: Cohasset Facilities Operations Manager 

We met with Brian to understand where our town's energy usage was 
greatest. 

Andrew Stern: VP CARE (Citizen's for Alternative Renewable Energy) 

Andrew and CARE played a key role in the town of Hull raising Hull 
Wind 1, a 600KW wind turbine. Andrew provided us information of 
available resources and options for Cohasset to look at should we proceed 
with a wind turbine. 

Hull Wind 1: 

On Saturday 19Nov05 members of the committee made a site visit to Hull 
Wind 1. We toured the site to get a feel for the size and scale. During our 
visit the winds were strong enough to have the rotors spinning at full 
speed and generating power, it was noted that we could stand at the base 
of the turbine and carry on a normal conversation. 

Kristen Burke: Massachusetts Technology Council (MTC) 

The MTC is a state program funded by a surtax on our electrical bill, the 
MTC is charged with working with local communities to build alternative 
(renewable) energy systems. Kristen is focused on wind power and she 
presented to the Cohasset Board of Selectman what services MTC offers 
to towns and the process followed when investigating the possible siting 
of a wind turbine. 

Committee findings to date 

• Demand - Usage of energy 

o We met with Cohasset' s Facilities Operations Manager, Brian Adams, so 
we could understand where our energy usage is greatest. The largest user 
of energy for natural gas and electric demand is the Junior/Senior High 
School followed by the Deer Hill and the Osgood. The Junior/Senior High 
usage is greater than the Deer Hill and Osgood combined. Other buildings 
in town such at the Town Hall, Department of Public Works and the 
Community Center use "minor" amounts of energy compared to our 
school buildings. 



168 



Supply - Production of energy 

o Wind: Can offer the best/fastest return on investment, there are several 
programs offered at the regional level that make money and engineering 
services available if we were to investigate wind power. 

■ Part of what makes wind so cost effective is the number options for 
cash flow a wind turbine can generate and the number of 
government sponsored programs. MTC offers extensive 
engineering services at no to minimal cost, having a wind turbine 
raised on town land can offer tax revenue or there can be monies 
generated by the sale of renewable energy credits. Additionally 
when the turbine is generating power, that power offsets 
potentially higher priced electricity from the grid. 

■ Hull Wind 1 paid for itself in three years of operation. 

o Solar: 

■ Hot Water is one of the most economical methods of harvesting 
alternative energy; systems can be scaled in size to deal with large 
amounts of water. In the school buildings, solar hot water could be 
used for a variety of needs including pre-heating water for use in 
the heating system, showers, and for the kitchens. Even during 

w inter months solar hot water can lower overall costs of producing 
hot water. Due to our freezing temperatures the system needs to be 
designed to avoid damage during the winter months. Hot water 
systems are normally roof mounted to capture maximum light. 

■ Electricity: (solar PV) One of the most expensive forms of 
Alterative energy. Solar photovoltaic panels like solar hot water 
offer Toof mounting options. For best energy generation, panels 
should be mounted on tracking poles or on special racks that allow 
realignment from summer to winter orientations. Like wind, solar 
PV is where extensive research is being focused. 

o Biogas: In some cases it is possible to extract methane gas from capped 
landfills, that gas can be used instead of, or in conjunction with, natural 
gas. Our landfill is too small and too old to serve as a reliable source of 
methane gas. 

o Water turbines: There are locations in the world where tidal action or 
reversing falls offer excellent locations for water turbines for electrical 
generation. In Cohasset our two reversing falls and local tides do not offer 
a large enough drop elevation nor in amount of water flow to be effective. 
There are experimental placements of equipment that generate electricity 
by wave motion but this technology is not expected to cost effective for 
another 8-15 years. 



169 



o Current Law: At this time the committee has not investigated the local or 
state zoning laws. 

■ We have learned if Cohasset wants to own a wind turbine with the 
ability to sell/feed excess power back onto the electrical grid we 
would need to create a Municipal Power Company such as exists 
in Hull. The creation of such a company would take over 3 years 
and require special approval from the State House. 

■ There options exist with in the law for Cohasset to lease land to a 
power generation company so they can build wind turbines and sell 
us power at a fixed below market rate. 



Committee Next Steps 

• We are continuing to work with MTC to look at possible locations for the 
installation of a data collection tower. This tower, known as a MET tower, will 
collect wind data for 12 months. If the data shows the location has 'good wind' 
then we could begin investigation of financing and permitting operations should 
the town wish to install a turbine. 

• We will continue to investigate solar hot water; additionally MTC is starting up 
new options for lOKW solar PV systems that we will review. 

• There are possible options for the town to have energy audits performed to obtain 
a better understanding of where we could enact conservation methods to lower 
energy use. 

o "The least expensive energy is the energy you do not use." 
o "The cleanest form of energy is the energy not needed." 



170 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit the Annual Report for the Cohasset Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2005 

A statistical analysis of the Department responses for the year is as follows: 

Building / Structure Fires 50 

Brush / Outdoor Fires 19 

Motor Vehicle Crashes 158 

Motor Vehicle Fires 6 

Medical Emergencies 833 

Investigations 97 

Inspections 458 

Assistance 1 26 

Miscellaneous 495 

Total 2,242 

Medical Responses: 

Total Incidents 991 

Basic Life Support Transports 1 77 

Advanced Life Support Transports 394 

Mutual Aid Rendered 184 

Mutual Aid Received 103 

Mutual Aid with other Towns, for fires: 

Rendered 47 

Received 21 



171 



APPARATUS 

The Fire Department is currently operating with the following apparatus: 

Engine 1 - 1994 Pierce - 1,750 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 

Engine 2 - 1987 Pierce - 1,250 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 

Engine 3-2001 HME/ Central States - 1,250 G.P.M. Pumping Engine 

Ladder 1 - 2004 Pierce - 105 Foot Aerial Ladder Truck 

Squad 1 - 2000 Ford - 4 wheel drive - 500 G.P.M. pump 

Rescue 3 - 2001 Ford - E-450 - Ambulance 

Car 20 - 1995 Ford - 4 wheel drive - Chiefs Vehicle 

Rescue Craft - 1993 Avon - 14ft. Inflatable/trailer 

hi conclusion, I would like to extend to the Citizens of Cohasset, the Board of Selectmen, 
the Town Manager, and the Heads and Members of all Town Departments and 
Committees my sincere thanks and appreciation for their assistance. 

To the Offices and Firefighters of the Department for their dedication and performance of 
duties, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Roger W. Lincoln 

Chief of the Fire Department 



172 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

UNIFORM CRIME REPORT 2005 STATISTICS 

Offense Reported 

Robbery 

Assaults 4 

Breaking and Entering 37 

Larceny 87 

Larceny of Motor Vehicle 1 1 

Vandalism 110 

Criminal Complaints Sought 74 

Motor Vehicle Accidents Investigated 163 

Motor Vehicle Citations Issued 846 

Parking Tickets Issued 429 

Residential & Business Alarms answered 562 

Stolen Motor Vehicles Recovered 4 

Emergency and other calls for service 1 2,967 

Department Vehicle Mileage 124,685 

Special Details 724 

Domestic Violence Cases Investigated 17 

FID Cards Issued 2 

LTC Issued/ Renewed 30 



RECORD OF ARRESTS 2005 

Offense Male Female 

Assault and Battery 6 3 

Breaking and Entering 2 

Operating Under the Influence of Liquor 9 2 

Violation of Drug Laws 2 

Warrants 8 

Larceny 2 

Shoplifting 2 1 

Minor in Possession of Alcohol 8 3 



173 



Offense Male Female 

Motor Vehicle Violation 

Protective Custody 

Malicious Destruction of Property 

Violation of Protective Order 

Use of a Motor Vehicle without Authority 

Uttering False Prescription 

Failure to Stop for Police 

Courtesy Booking 



63 17 



TOTAL ARRESTS 80 



6 


3 


10 


5 


2 





1 





1 





1 





1 





2 






FEES RETURNED TO GENERAL FUND 

Court Fines & Assessments $ 1 5,928.00 

Parking Violations $ 1 8,7 10.00 

Paid Detail Surcharge $ 6,454.65 

License Fees $ 3,934.00 

Request for Police Reports $ 95 1 .00 

False Alarms/ Billing S 1,775.00 

TOTAL $47,752.65 



Respectfully submitted, 

James M. Hussey, Chief of Police, 

Cohasset, MA 



174 



REPORT OF THE EMERGENCY DISPACH CENTER 

To the citizens of the Town of Cohasset I hereby submit the Annual Report of the 
Cohasset Emergency Dispatch Center for the year ending December 31, 2005. 

This year again was a very busy year for all Dispatch personnel. Dispatch personnel 
received 12,967 calls for emergency and other related services. 

The department continues to work with the Town Assessors office updating the Towns E- 
911 Database and making sure all homes are numbered properly. All residents are asked 
to number their residence properly by placing the number where it can be seen by the 
police and fire units 

On November 7'^ and 8'^ 2005, this Department hosted a fire dispatch training class. The 
Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO) taught this class. Three 
dispatchers attended the class from the Town of Cohasset: Dispatcher Douglas, 
Dispatcher Lowery and Dispatcher McCarthy. There were several Dispatchers from 
around the South Shore area in attendance, as well as Dispatchers from New Hampshire 
and Maine. I would like to thank the Cohasset Light Keepers Corporation for providing a 
site for the class, and Cohasset Harbor inn for providing Housing for the attendees from 
out of state. 

The winter of 2005 was very snowy with very low temperatures. There were very busy 
times that required two dispatchers to work. Many of the dispatch staff live out of Town 
and were therefore unable to get home for long periods of time. I would like to thank the 
Cohasset Harbor Inn for stepping up to the plate and offering rooms to all dispatch 
employees that were unable to get home. 

All residents and business owners are reminded that if you have a burglar alarm or fire 
alarm; please keep your contact information up-to-date with the Dispatch Center. All 
information will be entered into the department's database. You can call 1-781-383-1055 
Ex 1003 for more information. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Emergency Dispatch Center who work 
in a very stressful job answering the emergency needs of the Town of Cohasset: 
Dispatcher Patricia Douglas, Christopher Grant, Patricia Lowery, John Hussey, Kelli 
McCarthy David Weeks and Sasha Geddes for their dedication and service to The Town 
of Cohasset. 

I would also like to thank William Griffin Town Manager, the Honorable Board of 
Selectmen, Chief of Police, James M. Hussey, and Fire Chief, Roger W. Lincoln, for 
their continued support of the Cohasset Emergency Dispatch Center. 

Respectfully Submitted. 
Thomas W. Wigmore 
Communications Supervisor 



175 



Report of the Office of Emergency Management 

During the year we continued to develop our emergency preparedness capabilities, we 
were funded for the first time with a line item in the town budget of S5,000. We received 
a grant from the state for SI 2,000 which we plan to use to purchase personal protective 
equipment for the Police, Fire and DPW employees. 

During January '06 we will be conducting a tabletop exercise to access our capabilities to 
respond to certain emergencies and disasters. 

The Board of Health has been developing plans for a pandemic response, and has 
reactivated their network of volunteer medical professionals. The Board continues to 
work with the Fire Department to establish a training program, so they can locate more 
defribulators in town owned buildings, defribulators were placed in the schools this year. 
The Board of Health was the recipient of a State Public Health Grant of S5,000 again this 
year. 

As required by FEMA, we were able to certify 21 Town employees in the National 
Incident Management System (NIMS), in doing so we continue to qualify for FEMA 
funds. During 2006 we will be required to certify nearly all Town Employees, including 
teachers. 

The national network RACES/ARES was reestablished, the network is a backup 
communication system through the amateur radio operators; the system allows us to 
communicate with MEMA and FEMA in case of a failure of other communication 
systems. 

We were authorized by the December Town Meeting to purchase a mass calling program, 
(Reverse 911 so called), that will allow us and other town agencies to communicate 
emergency information to large numbers of residents in a short time. Along with the 
Town Manager we are establishing an Advisory Committee to oversee the selection and 
management of this system. 

Our emergency shelter supplies and equipment are being updated and restocked, through 
a $5,000 appropriation of the December Town Meeting. We are also working with the 
Board of Directors of the Community Center to establish their facility as an Emergency 
shelter. Our large incident shelter is the Middle-Hieh School. 



'c^ 



During the year we were able to set up a coordinating committee for school related 
issues, consisting of one School Committee Member, the School Department Business 
Manager and the Middle-High School Vice Principal, these individuals are also members 
of the Emergency Preparedness Committee. This is a very important move, because the 
Town's Emergency Plan relies heavily on the School Department's facilities and assets. 
The Schools Safety and Crisis Plan in certain cases rely on the resources of various Town 
departments, agencies, and emergency management planning. 



176 



As part of our communication upgrades, we have been able to establish the 
telecommunications capacity, through the Water Department, to be able to transfer all of 
our emergency dispatch and data lines to our Backup EOC at the Water Treatment Plant. 
We expect during 2006 to have the transfer capability operational. 

We plan during 2006 to reestablish our volunteer network and offer them the required 
CERTS training. 

We wish to thank all the Town Departments for their participation in our work as we 
continue to improve our capabilities to respond. 

Respectfully submitted 

COHASSET OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Arthur L. Lehr, Jr., Director Emergency Management 
Glenn A. Pratt, Deputy Director Emergency Management 
Roger Lincoln, Chief of Fire Department 
James Hussey, Chief of Police Department 
Dr. Joseph Godzik, Health Agent 



177 



2005 ANNUAL REPORT 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



GENERAL: 

The Department of Public Works is a Town service organization responsible for 
providing essential services for the citizens of Cohasset. Services provided by this 
department include construction, maintenance and repair of streets, sidewalks and storm 
drainage systems; maintenance and repair of vehicles and equipment; maintenance of 
parks, cemeteries, athletic fields and off-street parking facilities; the transfer of public 
refuse and recyclables; snow removal and ice control; maintenance and/or removal of 
town owned trees; filling and maintenance of the fuel tanks. 

In addition to providing routine maintenance throughout the year, the following projects 
were completed by or under the direction of the DPW during the last year: 

Rebuilt or repaired 18 catch basins. 

histalled 150' of drainage pipe at Jerusalem Road and Rust Way. 

Dug out the flapper on Atlantic Avenue 49 times to alleviate flooding. 

Dug out 100' of the "cut" on Border Street. 

Rebuilt or replaced 8 fences. 

Replaced or repaired 52 traffic and street signs. 

In an effort to control algae in Little Harbor, we opened and closed the cat dam gates 
each month from April to December. 

Transferred 1.947 tons of solid waste and 868 tons of C&D. Recycled 840 tons of mixed 
paper products, 206 tons of scrap metals and cans, 49 tons of plastics, 143 tons of glass 
and 1,210 gallons of waste oil. Over 300 tons of leaves and brush were processed. This 
year has shown that the amount of recycling has dropped some, while the solid waste 
tonnage has increased. This may be due to an increase of residents using the RTF versus 
a private hauler. 

Constructed an additional 2 parking spaces at the Elm Street Senior Housing. 

Created 7 parking spaces at Wadleigh Park. 

Repaired and pressure washed the self-regulating tidal gate. 



178 



Replaced a section of culvert on Jerusalem Road. 

Installed a vault to enclose water and electrical lines for irrigation at the Middle High 
School front field. 

Repaired the Government Island bell. 

Repaired the light post at the Middle High School parking area. 

Dismantled and removed the condemned bleachers at Alumni Field. 

Dug test holes for the Beechwood Ballpark renovation project. 

Dug perk test holes at the Cook Estate. 

Removed various dead or diseased trees and planted new trees and shrubs throughout the 
town. 

Conducted and recorded 47 internments at the various town owned cemeteries. 

Prepared SI. 375 million Annual Operating Budget and $100 thousand Capital 
Improvement Program for Fiscal Year 2007. 

The Department of Public Works would like to extend our appreciation to all Town 
employees, boards and committees for their continued assistance and support during the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carl A. Sestito 
D.P.W. Superintendent 



179 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

December 31, 2005 

2005 was one of the most productive and successful years in the 55-year history of 
the Cohasset Water Department. Some of our most significant accomplishments 
were: 

Sale of Water to Linden Ponds. On November 17, 2005 we turned on the new 
booster pumping station at the Hingham Town Line, beginning the first year of a 20 
year contract to provide water for the Linden Ponds development in Hingham. 
Linden Ponds, also known as Erickson Retirement Communities, paid for the 
construction of the booster station, the one mile of new water main on route 3 A to 
connect the booster station to our water system, and other improvements to our 
system. 

Land Acquisition to Protect Water Supply. In 2005 we acquired over 23 acres of 
land in the watershed of Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir to prevent future 
development that may threaten drinking water quality. At the December 5 Special 
Town Meeting we received authority to acquire 45 additional acres. See attached 
map. We were also authorized to help protect 70 acres in our watershed in Scituate 
Storm water BMP Implementation Project. In 2005 we installed the first 5 
raingardens and two water quality swales in the Lily Pond Watershed to reduce 
nutrient loading. When the remaining 50 raingardens are constructed over the next 3 
years this project should reduce nutrient loading by 50% to Lily Pond from the 
Peppermint Brook watershed. 

Water Quality Improvements. To improve drinking water quality, including 
reducing Disinfection Byproducts and improving taste & odor, in 2005 we made 
many improvements to the Lily Pond Treatment Plant, including changing some 
water treatment chemicals. We are presently conducting year long pilot studies, and 
small scale water treatment process testing, to determine which long term 
improvements will work best for our particular source. 

24-Hour Operations. In March 2005 the Water Dept. went to 24 hour operations, to 
ensure the provision of the freshest water to our customers. Previously the Plant ran 
8-18 hours a day depending on the demand, and the rest of each day customers were 
supplied water from the storage tanks. In the short term we are running the plant 
around the clock with extra manpower, but are also in the process of upgrading the 
plant SCADA automation system so it can be run automatically part of the day. 
Distribution System Improvements. In 2005 we installed 7,150 feet (1.4 miles) of 
water mains to improve water service and fire protection throughout Cohasset. 



180 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. At the April 9, 2005 Town Election, Water 
Commissioner Glenn Pratt was reelected. At the Board's reorganization meeting in April, 
Commissioner Pratt was elected as Chairman. Commissioner John McNabb was elected 
Vice-Chairman, and Commissioner Nathaniel Palmer was elected Clerk. 

NEW STAFF. In 2005 we welcomed two new employees in Cohasset of American 
Water, our contractor responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Water 
Department: Eileen Commane, Superintendent, who brings over 20 years water supply 
management experience, and Steve May, Construction Manager. They join our current 
staff: - Distribution Supervisor Bill McAuliffe, Distribution Foreman Barry Sladen, 
Office Manager Brenda Douglas, Environmental Engineer Jared Hill, and Plant Operators 
Drew Cottone and Ted Lavin. 

THE COHASSET WATER DEPARTMENT provides water for domestic 
consumption and fire protection to about 90% of the Town of Cohasset. Our service area 
does not include the North Cohasset area, which is serviced by the Aquarion Water 
Company of Massachusetts (formerly known as the Hingham Mass-American Water 
Company). The Cohasset Water Department system encompasses about 36 miles of water 
mains, 2,429 service connections, and 386 fire hydrants. 

During 2005, a total of 263.561.870 gallons of water were produced and pumped to the 
distribution system. American Water Services, Inc. continues as the contractor 
responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Water Department under the 
direction and control of the elected Board of Water Commissioners. 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. Our fiscal situation continues to be excellent. The 
water rate increase approved at the April 2 Annual Town Meeting should provide 
sufficient funds to provide for our annual operating and maintenance needs as well as all 
our planned water system improvement projects for the next few years. Since 1997, we 
have borrowed and expended over $16,000,000 in capital improvements projects - which 
is over 7 times the 52.130,000 spending that the 1997 rate increase was expected to fund. 
We have been able to stretch these funds through measures such as the careful 
management of our debt structure, prudent expenditure of our occasional surpluses, and 
additional income from the System Development Charge, which was established in 2002. 
The Water Department is entirely self-supporting (as an Enterprise Fund) from user fees 
and other fees and charges (which does not impact non-customers living in North 
Cohasset who are served by the Aquarion Water Company in Hingham), including the 
fire hydrant rental fee from the Town. We do not receive any property tax revenue from 
the Town of Cohasset. We are also receiving additional revenue from the sale of water to 
the Linden Ponds development in Hingham, which commenced on November 17, 2005. 



181 



LAND ACQUISITION TO PROTECT WATER SUPPLY In 2005 we acquired 23 
acres to protect water quality of Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir. In December 
we were awarded state matching funds of S434.000 to acquire an additional 40 acres in 
the watershed for Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir. These land acquisitions 
represent long term protection for the integrity of the Town of Cohasset public drinking 
water supply for decades to come and are some of the most important accomplishments 
of the Water Department in the past twenty-five years. In 2005 work began on the 
installation of four stream gauging stations to monitor flow in and out of the watershed, 
in addition to existing stream gauging stations that have been in place for two years, as 
well as improvements to the fishways at the Bound Brook control Structure and the 
Aaron River Dam with completion projected for early 2006. 

SRF LOW INTEREST LOANS. Our loan applications for S20 million for the Drinking 
Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) program and S497,500 for the Clean Water Act SRF 
program were approved by the state in 2004. The Drinking Water SRF projects are 
planned to be completed over the next 6 years. The Clean Water SRF projects, which will 
retrofit stormwater structures and make landscape improvements to reduce pollutant 
loading into Lily Pond and the Aaron River Reservoir, will be completed over the next 3 
years. These 2% low interest loans save money for our ratepayers by allowing the Water 
Dept. to make water system improvements at a lower interest cost and the 5% we would 
otherwise be paying for capital improvement loans. 

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS. ]n 2005, continuing our long range 
water distribution system capital improvements plan first prepared by Tutela Engineering 
in 1996, we installed a total of 7,150 feet (1.4 miles) of water mains: 

• Route 3 A - installed 3,700 feet of new water main (paid for by Erickson 
properties) 

• Pond Street - 1,450 feet to replace undersized water mains 

• Cedar Lane - 700 feet to replace undersized water mains 

• Bow Street - 850 feet of new water mains 

• James Lane - 450 feet of new water main to connect new Films Meadow 
pumphouse 

We also replaced aged service connections, fire lines, and fire hydrants in the 
downtown area. We have coordinated our construction schedule with the ongoing 
Greenbush rail line reconstruction and the Downtown Revitalization Project. 

We fixed 11 leaks in 2005. 

In the 10 years since the water emergency in 1994, caused because of problems in 
the distribution system, we have replaced or rehabilitated 15.3 miles or about 48% of the 

36 miles of water mains in the distribution system, which has improved water service 
throughout Cohasset and has resulted in major measurable improvements in public safety 
by increasing fire flows in fire hydrants. 

FIRE HYDRANTS & VALVES. In 2005 we replaced 2 fire hydrants, installed 20 new 
hydrants, and painted 99% of our 386 hydrants. We replaced 5 gate valves and installed 

37 new gate valves. We also made progress in our short-term program to map and test all 
valves in the distribution system. 



182 



DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS (DBFs). At the beginning of 2005, the Water Dept. 
exceeded the standard for Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs), but halfway through the year 
we were in compliance and have been in compliance ever since. Our successful efforts to 
meet this standard was the result of intensive work during 2004 and 2005 to study and 
improve the operation of the Lily Pond Treatment Plant and the distribution system, and 
many improvements that were made over the past two years. The installation of baffles in 
the Clearwell in the Treatment Plant in March 2005 helped by reducing the amount of 
chlorinated organics while still keeping the required chlorine contact time to protect 
public health. The two improvements which have also made the greatest impact were the 
move to 24-hour operations in March 2005, and the addition of Ferric Chloride to the 
treatment process in September 2005. To stay ahead of the next round or regulatory 
requirements for TTHMs, we are in the process of piloting two potential major retrofits to 
the plant to improve water quality - MIEX and Ozone/BAC. 

TREATMENT PLANT OPTIMIZATION. During 2005 American Water, together 
with a well recognized water treatment consultant, has continued to re-evaluate and make 
numerous improvements to the operation of the water treatment plant. This optimization 
process is aimed at continually reviewing operational data and the performance of each 
separate step of the water treatment process including the impact of one process upon 
another. These steps include raw water intake and rapid mixing, flocculation; which 
gently mixes the coagulant treated water necessary to cause the undesirable material to 
settle out of the water, sedimentation; which maximizes the settling of the undesirable 
matter and lastly through the filtration process itself. The focus of the optimization effort 
has been to achieve the maximum possible treatment levels within the physical 
constraints of the existing facilities. The optimization process has led to initiation of 
process improvements such as ferric chloride, liquid polymer addition, potassium 
permanganate addition, and several instrumentation and control improvements. In 
addition, process control through increased laboratory testing and process monitoring has 
been increased. The changes, first to enhanced coagulation using aluminum sulfate and 
then to the upgrade and full-scale pilot testing (following application to and approval by 
the DEP) of polyaluminum chloride have all been supported by these improvements. We 
also performed studies to optimize corrosion control. 

LILY POND TREATMENT PLANT IMPROVEMENTS. In addition to the 
improvements noted above, in 2005 \\e made the following needed improvements and 
upgrades to the Treatment Plant in 2005 as part of the Drinking Water SRF low interest 
loan program: 

• Replaced the filter media (improve water quality by reducing color and turbidity). 

• Installed baffles in the clearwell and moved the prechlorination point from before the 
filters to after the filters (to reduce TTHMs) 

• Replaced a raw water pump and motors (to improve operating reliability and reduce 
electrical cost) 

• Added chemical feed pacing from the raw water flow meter (enable chemical feed 
pacing with variable raw and finished water flows). 

• Replaced flow and pressure transmitters (replacement will enable operators more 
flexibility in terms of remote monitoring of processes) 



183 



• Began installation of video security system to monitor the Lily Pond Water 
Treatment Plant and remote sites of the water system. 

WATERSHED PROTECTION. The Water Commission employs Norfolk Ram Group 
to conduct watershed protection work for the Water Department. In 2005 this included: 

• Land Acquisition Grant Application Successful. Submitted an application for the 
Drinking Water Supply Protection Grant: which was successful in obtaining a 
5434,000 Land Purchase Grant Program that provides 50% EOEA grant funds for 
land purchases application. 

• Review of Watershed Threats, including ongoing review of the hazardous waste 
site at the former Norfolk Conveyor site and monitoring source water quality within 
Lily Pond, Aaron River Reservoir and their tributaries as part of the Commission's 
program of watershed management. 

• Review of Development Projects including the Cook Estate and Cedarmere. 

• Nutrient Loading Investigations. In 2005 Norfolk Ram Group performed some 
research on possible methods to control or reduce eutrophic conditions in Lily Pond, 
conditions which impair the Pond's primary function as a drinking water supply in 
the following ways: Increase concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), 
particularly dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that are problematic precursors to 
trihalomethane (TTHM) formation during water treatment chlorination Loss of 
supply volume due to long term build up of sediments Excessive plant growth -plants 
that draw nutrients from pond sediments, and cause fouling of the plant intake, and 
contribute, via annual senescence and decay, to the dissolved organics problem 

• 319 Grant Application. Norfolk's investigation lead to the submittal of an 
unsuccessful 319 Non-Point Source Pollution Grant Application for "In-Lake 
Restoration and Management of Lily Pond" (June 1, 2005 submittal). The 
application sought state funding for two recommended in-lake restoration methods 
considered to have the greatest potential for minimizing the presence of DOC and 
reducing the level of eutrophication in Lily Pond: The grant sought funds to (1) 
dredge sediments from 14 acres of the westerly portion of Lily Pond, (2) three years 
of annual harvesting of weeds prior to the end of each growing season, and (3) a 
lakeshore restoration project to reduce lawn areas around the water treatment plant. 

• Stream Gauging. In 2005 Norfolk continued on-going stream gauging at key 
tributaries to Lily Pond as part of a program to track the quantities of source waters 
entering and exiting the Lily Pond system. The stream gauges are now undergoing 
an upgrade to enable stream gauge information to be transmitted back to the water 
plant automatically. 

STORMWATER BMPS. With funds from our Section 319 Grant (5255,000) and the 
2% low interest loans for $497,500 from the Clean Water SRF (CWSRF) program over 
the next three years we will implement both structural and non-structural solutions for 
eliminating and/or reducing nonpoint source pollution in the watershed for Lily Pond and 
the Aaron River Watershed. The s. 319 grant was awarded in 2003; we submitted the 
formal loan application for the CWSRF loans on October 15, 2004 and we began 
construction of 5 raingardens in the Lily Pond watershed in 2005. This Project will utilize 
structural best management practice (BMP) solutions and will incorporate low impact 



184 



development (LED) strategies wherever possible to contain and minimize off-site flows and 
pollutant loading in these areas. Structural BMP improvement options to be considered 
will include; hooded catchbasins, bioretention facilities, Rain Gardens, roadside swales 
with biofilters and spill containment facilities. 

As part of the on-going 319 grant funded stormwater project, the Norfolk Ram Group, on 
behalf of the Water Commission, worked closely with the Cohasset Garden Club to 
determine appropriate plantings in Cohasset during construction of the Rain Gardens. A 
"demonstration rain garden" was constructed at the Water Treatment Plant that intercepts 
and treats stormwater that runs off the parking lot into Lily Pond. In support of the 319 
grant funded stormwater project, Norfolk completed wet-weather sampling and testing of 
stormwater that enters Peppermint Brook and Lily Pond. This effort is important for 
documenting stormwater quality prior to the implementation of the Low Impact 
Development stormwater 

SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT & PROTECTION (SWAP) REPORT. On 

January 16, 2004 the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) 
issued the final SWAP Report for the Cohasset Water Department. The SWAP report 
identifies the sources of Cohasset public drinking water supply, the protection areas 
around those supplies, inventories the potential sources of contamination, and makes a 
number of recommendations to improve protection of our water supplies. The Cohasset 
Water Commission, in its ongoing watershed protection program, following the 2002 
Surface Water Supply Protection Plan, is planning on implementing the 
recommendations of the SWAP along with the many other water supply protection 
measures already underway. 

AVALON 40B PROJECT APPEAL. In May, 2004 Avalon Cohasset, Inc, filed a 
Motion to Dismiss the appeal (Land Court Miscellaneous Case No. 294252) filed by the 
Water Commission, which seeks to overturn the Comprehensive Permit granted by the 
Zoning Board of Appeals on October 27, 2003 for a 200-unit development in the Lily 
Pond Watershed. On June 15 the Water Commission filed its Opposition to the Motion to 
Dismiss. A hearing on the Motion was held June 23, 2005 in Land Court before Judge 
Sands, who dismissed our complaint. We appealed to the Massachusetts Appeals Court 
who has not yet set a date for a hearing. 

WELLFIELDS. Both wellfields are still out of service. At the end of 2005 construction 
of a new pumphouse at the Ellms Meadow Wellfield was almost complete, and we expect 
to get that wellfield back on line in 2006. We have so far been unsuccessful in finding a 
new location for the Sohier Street wells, which have to be relocated because of the 
restoration of the Greenbush Rail Line which are located too close to the current well 
location. The MBTA has provided the Water Commission with $250,000 for the 
relocation of the wells, as part of their mitigation measures to the Town. 

COOPERATION WITH OTHER TOWN DEPARTMENTS. The Cohasset Water 
Department cooperated with many other Town of Cohasset departments during 2005 
including: 



185 



• Worked with the Community Preservation Committee and other town officials and 
boards, as well as with the Trustees of Reservations and the Cohasset Conservation 
Trust, to acquire land in the Lily Pond Watershed. 

• Managing the Newtonville Lane drainage and roadway reconstruction project, 
including installing a water main loop from Newtonville to Elm court, for the Town. 

• Coordinating paving with the Highway Department on North Main Street and in the 
Downtown area. 

• Provided the Fire Department access to the Treatment Plant site for training 
practices. 

• The Water Department does billing for the Sewer Department. 

CONCLUSION. The strength and successes of today's Water Department have been 
possible because of the vision and extraordinary efforts of the Water Commission and 
staff in the 1970's, to conceptualize, design, permit, and build the Aaron River Reservoir 
and the Lily Pond Treatment Plant which turned Cohasset from a water-poor town to a 
water-rich town. 

During 2005, the Cohasset Water Commission has implemented many major 
infrastructure investments, operational initiatives, land acquisition and landscaping 
projects which significantly enhance our ability to protect our water supply, treat, pump 
and deliver excellent drinking water and reliable water service for domestic and 
firefighting use for our customers - our ratepayers in Cohasset. We have accomplished 
these important achievements within our current rate structure, since our financial 
position remains excellent. 

The Board of Water Commissioners and the Water Department would like to thank all 
the Town officials, boards, citizens, and committees who have supported and assisted us 
throughout 2005. We will continue to improve the water system in the coming years for 
the benefit of all customers and the Town of Cohasset. 

Respectfully submitted. 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Glenn A. Pratt, Chairman 

John K. McNabb, Jr., Vice-Chairman 

Nathaniel Palmer, Clerk 



186 




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187 



Report of the Water Resources Protection Committee 

During 2005 the Committee met 8 times with a primary focus of working with the Water 
Department to implement and promote various conservation and management procedures 
tied to the maintenance of a high quality water source for the town. 

The first half of the year meeting topics included discussions with various groups 
working on invasive plants; water management practices; the development of rain 
gardens in the Lily Pond Basin. The committee monitored the Greenscapes hiitiative 
voted by the Town Meeting. Committee members have reached out to the public through 
published articles on low maintenance lawn care, health effects of chemical lawn 
additives and water conservation. Additionally members of the committee have been 
active participants on the Conservation Committee; Garden Club, Harbor Health 
Committee and the Center for Student Coastal Research to assist in coordinating 
activities. 

In the fall the WRPC actively supported the acceptance of an article establishing with a 
permanent conservation easement for headwaters of Pepperment Brook to minimize 
potential development pressures from adjacent property. Additionally several members 
had participated in the development of the proposal for the James Brook Study submitted 
(successfully) to the Mass Coastal Zone Management Board. 

Respectively submitted, 

James C. Kinch 
Chairman 



188 



Sewer Commission 2005 Annual Report 

Warrant articles for the approval and funding of the Little Harbor/Atlantic Avenue and 
North Cohasset Sewer Expansion projects, totaling S13.2M, were approved by the 2005 
Annual Town Meeting. The articles provided that the property owners who would benefit 
from the sewer expansion would pay for all costs associated with the projects. Another 
article was approved which, upon obtaining a majority vote in a special election, would 
require 50% of the sewer expansion costs for the collection system and central plant 
modifications to be paid from town general tax revenue. This proposed cost sharing, 
consistent with payment provisions for previous expansions in the Central and North 
Cohasset sewer districts, failed to gain a majority vote in the special election. Thus all 
costs associated with the sewer expansion (collection system, central plant modifications 
and private property connecting pipes and grinder pumps) will be borne by the property 
owners. Project Evaluation Forms were filed with the state to obtain state revolving funds 
for financing the expansion. Preliminary feedback indicates that the Cohasset project is 
highly ranked and quite likely to be declared eligible for low interest loans from the state. 
Collection system design work has been completed, and work has commenced on the 
detailed design work related to the central treatment plant. It is anticipated that the 
design work will be completed by the fall of 2006 and bidding and construction will 
commence in 2007. This should allow all sewer connections (which will involve 
homeowners contracting for the work on their property) to be completed by 2010. 

The Sewer Commission also presented an article at the 2005 Annual Town Meeting, for 
SIOOK, which was approved to begin the process of assessing decentralized wastewater 
options in the areas of our community currently not targeted for sewer expansion. The 
evaluation efforts will attempt to identify viable areas for satellite treatment and disposal 
facilities which will further safeguard our drinking water supply and water resources. A 
desktop assessment is continuing this spring and will be followed by soil investigations 
during the summer of 2006 at potential sites. It is anticipated that the preliminary 
evaluation efforts will be finalized by the fall of 2006. 

The Commission continued its infiltration/inflow (I/I) program in 2005 to reduce the 
influence of storms and tidal action on the original collection system piping. Work will 
be continuing on a new flow monitoring program to reassess I/I prone areas of the 
existing sewer collection system. Efforts to further reduce the excess flows coming from 
leakage and infiltration are anticipated to be stepped up over the next year in preparation 
for the upcoming expansion efforts. 



189 



The Central Treatment Plant continued to operate very successfully throughout the year, 
thereby giving confidence that the plant expansion using the same membrane technology 
should perform as designed. Capacity issues have continued to consume a significant 
amount of the Commission's time due to litigation and political pressures brought on 
behalf of individual lot owners as well as proposed developments such as Cedarmere, 
Avalon, the Cook Estate and Jerusalem Road Estates. The Commission will continue its 
commitment to satisfy the outstanding judicial judgment requirements as well as helping 
to eliminate existing pollution sources. The guiding philosophy will continue to be to 
provide sewer service to existing homes with failing septic systems, within the 
established service areas, before any consideration is given to new developments. 



Respectfully submitted. 



John Beck, Clerk 

Sean Cunning, Vice Chairman 

Raymond Kasperowicz, Chairman 



190 



REPORT OF THE COHASSET HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



We first pay tribute to Noel Ripley, Chairman of the Historical Commission since its 
inception and long-time advocate of Cohasset historic preservation, who died in July. 
Through his years of service and volunteer time, the Captain's Walk was developed, the 
Minot Light Replica completed. Veteran's pictures hung in the Town Hall, the Cohasset 
Common Historic District was established, the Town History Committee was created, 
and many other historic projects proceeded. His knowledge of and passion for Cohasset 
will be greatly missed. 

The Cohasset Historical Commission worked on the following projects this past year: 

Demolition Delay Article - The Commission and a private group of citizens proposed a 
demolition delay zoning by-law article for Town Meeting. This by-law would include 
houses on the HT (Heritage Trail) list. National Register listing and significant houses 
over 100 years old. The citizens at Town Meeting felt more strongly about individual 
property rights than town preservation and the article did not pass. 

Nominations for National Register - Areas of town have been identified over the years as 
eligible for National Register of Historic Places. The Commission approached PAL 
Public Archaeology Laboratory, Inc.) to draw up a proposal to prepare the necessary 
application to be submitted for the "Jacob's Meadow Area." The Community 
Preservation Committee was approached for funding. Due to the lack of knowledge about 
National Register Listings, the proposal was tabled. More education is needed on the 
definitions, benefits and advantages of National Register Listings. A National Register 
Listing application was submitted for the Historical Society's Pratt Building on South 
Main Street. This project is nearing completion. 

Surveys - One of the primary duties of the Commission is to inventory historical 
properties in Cohasset. To date, over 1600 properties have been surveyed and the 
information sent to the Massachusetts Historical Commission. This past year, the survey 
was expanded. When a historic property is altered or replaced, updated information and 
pictures are submitted to the state. A copy of the survey is on file at the library. 

Cedarmere Project - In June, the Commission was represented at a meeting at 
Massachusetts Historical Commission to go over the plans at the former "Hayes Estate". 
The house and bam are significant both for their architecture and for the contributions of 
such former owners as Richard Washburn Child, author and diplomat and Samuel C. 
Stampleman, president of the Gillette Safety Razor Co.. Documentation detailing the 
history and significance of the property is on file. 



191 



Roundhouse and Turntable - Many people were able to view the railroad turntable in the 
town parking lot during its excavation in the fall of 2004. Meetings were held concerning 
keeping part of the site open and the appropriate signage. Unfortunately, it appears that 
we will not be able to keep the site open due to the parking constraints. Signage will be 
developed to note the location. 

Captain's Walk - The Commission continues to sell tee-shirts, sweatshirts and other 
items with pictures of the Minot Light Replica through the Cohasset News Store and 
during the Art Festival. Proceeds are used for the maintenance of the replica. This 
summer, the inside of the replica was cleaned and power washed. 

Membership - Paula Morse, a member for four years resigned. We thank her for her years 
of service. 

We thank the various town departments and committees that have helped and supported 
our goals. Our meetings are held the second Monday of the month at Town Hall. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Rebecca Bates-Mc Arthur, Chairman 

David Wadsworth. Secretary 

Hamilton Tewksbury 

Marilyn Morrison 

Nathaniel Palmer 



192 



Report for Year 2005 Committee on Town History 

History is alive and well in Cohasset and though our history books are not on the 
Ledger's Top ten sales list, our three Narrative histories, one Treasury of previously 
published articles and the limited edition print sold throughout the year. 

The Committee on Town history set up a table at the Art Show in June and the Village 
Fair in December. Here is where the majority of sales are made, though our complete set 
of titles and prints are available throughout the year at the Town Clerk's office as well as 
our books are available at Buttonwood Books and the New Pratt Library. Prints are sold 
at the Cohasset Historical Society. 

Thanks to the Cohasset Mariner for their ongoing coverage of our book activity which 
helps build interest and direct buyers to either Buttonwood or Town Hall. 

The Minot Light prints, which were given to Cohasset by the executrix of Boston 
publisher's estate, have been selling well and have returned nearly $5,000 to the book 
account, hi addition, the Committee ordered more slip case boxes to enable the three 
Narratives to be sold as a boxed set. One bulk sale alone to a prominent Cohasset realtor 
netted over $1,000. 

The book account is now over $30,000, which will help fund a forthcoming 2006 second 
Treasury being compiled by member Jackie Dormitzer. designed by Hal Coughlin and 
produced digitally by member Jim Hamilton. The cover will feature an aerial photograph 
taken by member Margot Cheel. It will be assigned an ISBN number and Library of 
Congress code number just as our other four books are recorded for national sales and 
archiving and will be available for Christmas 2006 sales. 

Our inventory of books are kept in a locked storeroom in the basement of Town Hall. 
Our films for the Narrative History Volume III and our electronic files for the three other 
titles are also stored there and all books are individually shrink wrapped to protect them 
from dust, humidity and moisture. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jim Hamilton 



193 



Cohasset Cultural Council 
Annual Summary: 2005 



The Cohasset Cultural Council is a part of the Massachusetts Cultural Council, which 
promotes excellence, access, education and diversity in the arts, humanities, and 
interpretive sciences to improve the quality of life for all Massachusetts residents and 
contribute to the economic vitality of our communities. 

The vision of every local cultural council in the state is for the arts, sciences and 
humanities have the power to build healthier, more livable, more vital communities. They 
are an essential part of a strong educational system. They contribute enormously to our 
economy. They build bridges across cultures. They can be used to address - or better yet, 
prevent - some of our most stubborn social problems. They help us interpret our past and 
shape our future. They help us understand what it means to be human. 

Local cultural councils are also committed to building a central place for the arts, 
sciences and humanities in the everyday lives of their community across the 
Commonwealth. Councils pursue this mission through a combination of grant programs, 
partnerships and services for nonprofit cultural organizations, schools, communities and 
individual artists. 

The Cohasset Cultural Council receives an annual appropriation from the state 
Legislature and funds from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Wallace 
Foundation, and others. The funds are disbursed as grants given directly to non-profit 
cultural organizations, schools, communities, and individual artists. The beneficiaries of 
these programs are the citizens of Cohasset. 

Council Forums 
October 3, 2005 

Community Input Meeting 

Town Hall 
November 14, 2005 

Business Meeting for 2006 Grant Cycle 

Paul Pratt Library 

2006 Grant Cycle Allocation 

Twenty-seven applications were received requesting funding for programs amounting to 
$15,530. The council approved twelve applications, (44% of the applications), and 
awarded $4,100, (26.4% of the total requested funds). 



194 



Approved Grant Applicants 

Broad Cove Choral/Unicom Singers 

Choral Arts Society 

Cohasset Dramatic Club 

Cohasset Middle High School Arts Boosters 

Deer Hill School 

Duxbury Art Association 

James Library & Center for the Arts 

North River Arts Society 

Joseph Osgood School 

Plymouth Philharmonic 

Rusty Skippers Community Band 

South Shore Art Center 

Council Ledger 

S5,100 Balance maintained in the council's account 

$2.500 Awarded from the state for the 2006 Grant Cycle 

S7600 Total funds 

$2.500 Outstanding grants from the 2004 and 2005 Grant Cycles 

$5,100 Total unencumbered funds 

$4.100 Awarded 2006 Grant Cycle 

$1,000 Unencumbered funds for future disbursement 

Portions of the above summary are excerpts for the Massachusetts Cultural Council web 
site at wwvv.mass-cullure.org . This summary is respectfully submitted by the Cohasset 
Council Members. 

Selene Carlo-Eymer: Chair 

Alex Adkins 

Douglas Eymer 

Mary Foley 

Klaus Gensheimer 

Joan Jensen 

Elizabeth Morse 

Betts Murray 

Suzanne Terry 



195 



Annual Report of the Paul Pratt Memorial Library - 2005 

The Paul Pratt Memorial Library flourished in 2005. Library checkouts at our new 
facility on Ripley Road continue to grow, with a 42% increase in loan activity from 2003. 
Our public computer terminals are in constant use, and our website 
www.cohassctlibrarv.org makes it possible to access research materials, browse the 
collection, and reserve museum passes as well as renewing and putting holds on books 
from your home computer. The library's wireless environment accommodates many 
patrons using laptop computers. We will be adding laptop computers for use in the 
library as well as three new computer stations in the Children's area. 

Our wildly successful Children's Program under the leadership of Children's Librarian 
Sharon Moody continues to attract large numbers of children and their parents, with 
attendance figures of 4104 at the various story hours, summer programs and reading 
groups. We are expanding our adult programming with Reference Librarian Gayle Walsh 
organizing author appearances, a film series, a book group, and a lecture series. Our 
meeting rooms are in constant use by various town groups, and we host art exhibits 
provided by the South Shore Art Center that change monthly. All of these activities make 
our library a vibrant center of community life. 

The Investment Advisory Committee, chaired by Patience Towle, recommended a 
conservative investment policy and a takeout rate of 4%, which the Board adopted. At 
the Special Town Meeting in December, it was voted to ask the Massachusetts 
Legislature to establish the Cohasset Library Trust, Inc., a nonprofit organization that will 
raise and receive funds in support of the Library. It is expected that the Legislature will 
act on the petition in 2006. The Library Friends, chaired by Gail Flynn, continue to 
enhance our library services by providing Museum passes, assisting with receptions, 
honoring volunteers and staff, delivering books to shut-ins, and funding the successful 
Children's programs. 

This year the Library received a $10,000 Federal Grant awarded by the Massachusetts 
Board of Library Commissioners for improving customer service. Library Director Jackie 
Rafferty and our staff provide an environment that promotes reading and learning, despite 
the added workload that our successful operation has imposed. We wish to thank town 
government and our loyal patrons for their support. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sarah Pease, Chair 
Sheila Evans 
Rodney Hobson 
Roger Lowe 
Agnes McCann 
Barbara Power 
Carol Riley 
Patience Towle 
Stacey Weaver 



196 



REPORT OF PLYMOUTH COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

The Commissioners of the Plymouth County Mosquito Control Project are 
pleased to submit the following report of our activities during 2005. 

The Project is a special district created by the State Legislature in 1957, and is 
now composed of all Plymouth County towns, the City of Brockton, and the Town of 
Cohasset in Norfolk County. The Project is a regional response to a regional problem, 
and provides a way of organizing specialized equipment, specially trained employees, 
and mosquito control professionals into a single agency with a broad geographical area of 
responsibility. 

The 2005 season began with a normal water table until record April precipitation 
produced large numbers of spring and summer brood mosquitoes throughout the County. 
Efforts were directed at larval mosquitoes starting with the spring brood. Ground and 
aerial larviciding was accomplished using B.t.i., an environmentally selective bacterial 
agent. Upon emergence of the spring brood of mosquitoes, ultra-low volume adulticiding 
began. The Project responded to 1 1.578 requests for service from residents. 

In response to the elevated threat of mosquito borne diseases in the district, we 
increased our trapping, aerial and ground larviciding, and adult spray in areas of concern 
to protect public health. 

Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus was first isolated from Culiseta melanura, a 
bird biting species, by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health in Kingston on 
July 25. 2005. Of the season's total of forty five EEE isolates, twenty eight were from 
Plymouth County as follows: Abington (9/12), Carver (8/17, 8/29, 9/5), Duxbury (8/5). 
Halifax (8/22, 9/1, 9/5, 9/7), Hanover (9/7, 9/14), Hanson (9/13), Kingston (7/25, 7/27(2), 
8/1(2), 8/8, 8/10, 8/22. 9/12, 9/19, 9/28), Lakeville (9/12, 9/19), Pembroke (8/1, 9/9), 
Rockland (9/7). Four human cases of EEE were confirmed including two fatalities 
(Halifax and Kingston) and two non-fatal cases (Duxbury and Plymouth). No horses 
were diagnosed with EEE in Plymouth County. We normally end our spray season on 
Labor Day. This year, because of increased virus isolations, we extended our residential 
spray program into October. Town and City based requests for area wide spray 
continued throughout the district through October 7, 2005. Based on guidelines defined 
by the "Vector Control Plan to Prevent EEE" in Massachusetts, Southeastern 
Massachusetts will be at a "moderate level of EEE risk" beginning the 2006 season. 

We are pleased to report that in 2005 there were no human or horse West Nile 
Virus cases in Plymouth County. A total of six birds tested positive for the West Nile 
Virus in the following five towns: East Bridgewater ( 1 ), Hanover ( 1 ), Marshfield ( 1 ), 
Pembroke (1), West Bridgewater (2). A total of eight isolations of West Nile Virus in 
mosquitoes were found in the following towns: Abington (9/13(2)), Bridgewater (9/15), 
Lakeville (9/26), Middleboro (8/29, 9/29) and Norwell (8/23, 9/13). 

The recurring problem of EEE and WNV continues to ensure cooperation 
between the Plymouth County Mosquito Control Project, local Boards of Health and the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. In an effort to keep the public informed, 
EEE and WNV activity updates are regularly posted on Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health website at www. state. ma.us/dph/wnv/wnvl .htm . 

The figures specific to the Town of Cohasset are given below. WTiile mosquitoes 
do not respect town lines the information given below does provide a tally of the 



197 



activities which have had the greatest impact on the health and comfort of Cohasset 
residents. 

hisecticide Application. 2,176 acres were treated using truck mounted sprayers 
for control of adult mosquitoes. More than one application was made to the same site if 
mosquitoes reinvaded the area. The first treatments were made in June and the last in 
October. 

During the summer 970 catch basins were treated to prevent the emergence of 
Ciilex pipiens, a known mosquito vector in West Nile Virus transmission. 

Our greatest effort has been targeted at mosquitoes in the larval stage, which can 
be found in woodland pools, swamps, marshes and other standing water areas. Inspectors 
continually gather data on these sites and treat with highly specific larvicides when 
immature mosquitoes are present. 

Water Management. During 2005 crews removed blockages, brush and other 
obstructions from 1,950 linear feet of ditches and streams to prevent overflows or 
stagnation that can result in mosquito breeding. This work, together with machine 
reclamation, is most often carried out in the fall and winter. 

Machine Reclamation. 545 linear feet of upland ditch was reconstructed in 
Cohasset using the Project's track driven excavator. 

Finally, we have been tracking response time, which is the time between notice of 
a mosquito problem and response by one of our inspectors. The complaint response time 
in the Town of Cohasset was less than two days with more than 122 complaints 
answered. 

Mosquito Survey. A systematic sampling for the mosquitoes in Cohasset 
indicates that Cq. perturbans was the most abundant species. Other important species 
collected include Ae. vexcms and Ur. sapphirina. 

We encourage citizens or municipal officials to visit our website at 
www.plymouthmosquito.com or call our office for information about mosquitoes, 
mosquito-borne diseases, control practices, or any other matters of concern. 

Raymond D. Zucker 
Superintendent 

Commissioners: 

Carolyn Brennan, Chairman 

Michael J. Pieroni, Vice-Chairman 

Leighton F. Peck, Secretary 

William J. Mara 

Kenneth W. Ludlam, Ph.D. 



198 



REPORT OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 



It gives us great pleasure to report to residents, the activities of their Recreation 
Commission for 2005. 

During the year, approximately 4,350 individuals of all ages participated in a variety of 
structured programs, activities and events. While budget restrictions persist, our latitude 
of use of the Revolving Account Fund for 100% Self-Supporting Programs are 
continuing under this financial mechanism causing no impact upon taxpayers. In fact, via 
the Recreation Commission's policy to charge an Administrative Service Fee charge to 
all R.A.F. sponsored programs, taxpayers are reimbursed for the cost of the recreation 
budget. That is, revenues produced via Administrative Service Fee's, coupled with 
budget sponsored program fees, service fees and charges helps reimburse taxpayers for 
the budget of their Recreation Commission. Only revenue on deposit in the General 
Fund can be considered recapitalization revenue. 

During Fiscal Year 2005, ending June 30, 2005 the Recreation Commission produced for 
the General Fund S95.527.47. 55,500.00 was produced for use by the Commission via 
grants and matching grant funds. Concurrently, 532,574.43 was transacted via Revolving 
Account Funds for 100% Self-Supporting via fees charged participants for a variety of 
services. Approximately another 5310.000.00 was transacted via other and direct self- 
supporting financial systems during F.Y. 2004, manifesting a collective 5443,601.90 of 
recreational services to residents. These figures do not include the thousands of man- 
hours that are annually donated by hundreds of residents, in support of a variety of 
program operations. 

Due to the financial difficulties town government faces during Fiscal Year 2005/2006, 
the Recreation Commission aims to become 75% to 100% self-supporting via revenue 
dedicated to the General Fund of the town only. Via fee charges and administrative 
service fees to contractors to the Commission our intent will be to recapitulate about 
$100,000.00 to 5120,000.00 back to taxpayers. It is our intent to do this with as little 
financial impact upon users of our services as possible. 

Municipal recreation is for the benefit of all residents and we continue to direct our 
efforts towards assurance of equal access and opportunity to the entire community. To 
this end, a specific and calculated portion of revenue was not collected this year from 
residents who were temporarily unable to pay full fee charges for services. In many 
instances time was volunteered in lieu of full fee payments, benefiting the department and 
participants of programs. 



199 



During this past year we have re-constructed a portion of our program operations 
specifically related to the after school recreation programming. After School Recreation 
Programs have been available for the past 30 years via the joint efforts of the recreation 
commission and school department. Vital towards the success of these particular 
programs remains the ability to offer them directly after school and at school facilities, 
precluding children requiring transportation. 

Generally, we have offered these programs on a limited basis; Fall, Winter, and Spring. 
Each session has generally been 5 to 6 weeks in duration. 

The current effort is to increase the number and types of programs offered. To this end 
many of the programs will be made available via contracted services thru our Revolving 
Account Fund for 100% Self -Supporting Services. Via this method, the per capita fee 
collected will be collectively utilized to operate the programs financially, while 15% of 
the gross revenue collected will be deposited back to the General Fund of the Town, 
hence, back to tax payers. 

Programming represents only one aspect of the responsibilities, duties, and functions as 
prescribed and conferred upon the recreation commission by both Massachusetts General 
Laws and By-Laws of the Town. Continuing efforts are focused upon upgrading and 
renovating existing outdoor recreational facilities under jurisdiction of the commission. 
Often times these undertakings are coordinated via a lending of both public and privately 
solicited resources and efforts, easing taxpayers' burden. 

Numerous town departments and officials have continued to support our effort in this 
area for which we remain enormously grateful. Further, we remain indebted to many 
private and civic groups for their magnanimous efforts and resources. Via the efforts of 
the Cohasset Basketball Boosters Club and Cohasset Soccer Club, the community is well 
served beyond the operations of sports programs only. 

The seven member, elected board of the Recreation Commissioner's, volunteer their 
services to the town and department meeting regularly in order to discuss a wide- 
spectrum of topics relative to the leisure needs and pursuits of all residents. Further, the 
Commissioner's establish policy, and provide departmental direction, support, and 
assistance. Each meeting is publicly posted at least one week prior to date and residents 
are cordially invited to attend and participate in any meeting. Essential to our proper 
function, and absolutely vital towards success, is the ability to remain responsive to the 
dynamic community needs. We consider your input and feedback our most important 
source of guidance. 



200 



Degree of community interest and support for recreational and leisure-time services can 
directly be measured by two essential factors. First and most logically, interest is 
measured by the level of participation by residents in various services. Secondly and 
perhaps as important, interest and support is readily recognizable by the extraordinary 
numbers of volunteers who donate their time, effort and expertise in conduct with a 
number of our programs, events and activities. 

The recreation commission wishes to acknowledge gratitude to the many individuals, 
civic and business organizations, school and sport's groups, town boards, committees and 
departments who have lent their support and assistance in our efforts to best serve the 
recreational and leisure needs of residents of all ages. While too numerous to mention 
each name, none are forgotten and all are sincerely appreciated and thanked. 



Respectfully yours, 

Richard P. Barrow, Chairman 

James H. Richardson, Vice-Chairman 

James E. Carroll, Secretary 

Anthony J. Carbone 

Lillian M. Curley 

Lisa L. Lojacono 

Mary K. Muncey 

John M. Worley, Director 



201 



Recreation Commission 
Youth Resources 

It is with distinct pleasure that the Recreation Commission submits their Annual Report 
to the residents of Cohasset. 

Having completed the transformation of the 60 year old town highway garage, to a teen 
center for Cohasset youngsters, opening the doors January 8* 2000, we now begin our 6'*' 
year of operation. 

The Garage, when open for general use or rented for functions, sports video games, pool 
table, big screen TV as well as a variety of other electronic and non-electronic games. 

As the town enters difficult and uncertain financial times, it will be incumbent upon us to 
operate the Garage on a close to 100% self-supporting basis. That is, we have been able 
to pay, via small per capita fee charges to youngsters for dances and special events, all of 
our operating costs, i.e.: heat, lights, phone, supplies, games, etc. However, via 
515,600.00 inserted in the recreation commission budget starting in Fiscal Year 2002, we 
were able to pay for staffing of the Garage. Due to current financial and continuing 
deficits faced by the Town, $13,000.00 of the SI 5.600.00 has been eliminated from the 
recreation commission budget. 

However, via the continued support and generosity of residents, civic and business 
organizations and per capita fee charges to the youngsters, we feel this deficit can be 
accommodated. Anyone wishing to help with this endeavor can find self-addressed 
envelopes just outside the Recreation Department office, in the foyer of Town Hall. 

The youth of Cohasset and members of the Recreation Commission wish to extend their 
most sincere gratitude to the numerous residents, business organizations, town boards, 
officials and departments who have generously donated money, time, effort, materials 
and supplies towards our projects and efforts. 

Respectfully yours, 

Richard P. Barrow, Chairman 

James H. Richardson, Vice-Chairman 

James E. Carroll, Secretary 

Anthony J. Carbone 

Lillian M. Curley 

Lisa L. Lojacono 

Mary K. Muncey 

John M. Worley, Director 



202 



GOVERNMENT ISLAND ADVISORY COMMITTEE - 2005 ANNUAL REPORT 

For the Annual Report of the year 2005 I'm going to use a couple of paragraphs from the 
2004 report - I think they're important and of interest to the Townspeople. 

The island's 59'^ birthday - 2005. The Town bought the Island - 7.4 acres - from the 
U. S. Government for $29,000.00 or about S3, 900.00 per acre - as I've said before, "Not 
a bad deal". The area consists of ledge, woods, shoreline and graded and seeded area to 
be used by the fisherman, sailing club members, townspeople (YOU) and visitors to 
Cohasset. 

The GIAC oversees these 7.4 acres for the town. We are an interested group of 
volunteers who make recommendations to the Selectmen for action to be taken. The 
Selectmen and/or Town Manager will, if necessary, go to Town Meeting for action by the 
voters - YOU. 

This past fall season Carl Sestito, DPW Superintendent, and his crew removed 
refurbished and replaced the bell located on the Templates. It was in dire need of 
attention - they did a nice job. The normal maintenance of the Island goes on with good 
cooperation between Carl, his crew and the GIAC. 

Please, as we have said many times, take some time to visit the area with your family and 
friends. Enjoy it, absorb it, and drink in some history that is right here in your harbor - in 
your backyard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury, Chairman 

Constance M. Afshar 

Richard P. Barrow 

John D. Muncey, Harbor Master 



203 



SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 
COHASSET TOWN REPORT 

Continuing Improvement, Progress and Growth - Substantial Facilitx Need 

Once again, the South Shore Regional School District is pleased and thankful for the 
opportunity to report on the "State of Vo-Tech" and how it relates to the eight district 
member communities. Now nearly recovered from the extensive budget cuts of two and 
three years past. South Shore has embarked on an aggressive long-term plan aimed at 
providing still better and more comprehensive career and technical educational pathways 
for the students of the region. More than at any other time, the value of multiple 
educational and future workplace options cannot be emphasized enough. Whether it be 
further academic improvements, equipment upgrading, programmatic examination and 
pursuit of new technical fields or the ongoing attempts to address the needs of a close to 
forty-five year old facility, Vo-Tech stands prepared to continue and enhance a 
partnership which targets positive results for all concerned. 

The 2005-2006 school year has opened with South Shore's highest enrollment in the 
school's history, following a trend of several years, and we are now "maxed out." The 
school is at capacity with an extensive waiting list. As reported last year, the Class of 
2009. like its immediate predecessor, did not have admissions room for students from 
outside the eight-town district. While this is obviously a very positive sign from the point 
of view of student and parent interest, it does have a financial consequence. The reduced 
tuition-based enrollments from other non-member towns, continues to drain a revenue 
stream that has always gone to help reduce district town assessments. We will certainly 
keep finance and advisory committees informed as we progress through the FY '07 
budgetary planning process. 

It is important to touch upon several noteworthy highlights that have attributed to an 
extremely successful past year, and which serve as indicators of continued improvement, 
progress and growth at your Hanover based regional resource. Among them: 

• MCAS results that continue to improve, with the best passing rates yet on the 
first testing try for the Class of 2007. It is anticipated that the Class of 2006 will 
mirtor its 2005 predecessor from which (100%) one hundred percent of South 
Shore's class reached the mandated competency determination criteria. The 
number of students achieving at the proficient and advanced levels is also on the 
rise. 

•Equipment upgrades or new installations have been made recently in the 
Welding, Automotive, Culinary Arts, Graphic Arts and HVAC programs. In 
addition, a complete overhaul and reconfiguration of the Drafting department was 
accomplished, with every workstation now able to utilize CAD, Computer Aided 
Drafting and Design. 



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•The heating and ventilation systems building-wide have been audited, and many 
repairs and upgrades already completed should greatly enhance energy efficiency 
as well as a more uniform control of climate-related equipment and delivery. 
•All academic and vocational curricula are or are in progress of becoming 
completely aligned with State DOE Frameworks. This includes several technical 
area third party credentialing articulations with state and national affiliations. 
•The school's automotive program continues to excel not only locally but also at 
the State and National levels. For the first time. South Shore students represented 
Massachusetts in both the Ford/AAA and Skills USA competitions, a rare feat for 
any such dual success by one school in the same year. 
•Two new wireless computer labs have been made available for student use, 
primarily by the English and Health Career departments, but indicative of the 
growing trend toward technological portability and flexibility. 
•In inter-scholastic sports post-season tournament play was realized to an 
unprecedented degree, as Viking teams qualified in Football. Boys and Girls 
Basketball, Hockey. Baseball and Lacrosse. The football and baseball team 
victories in the State Vocational tournaments resulted in State Championships. 

Growing involvement through the school's Parents' Association and Continuing 
Education program has provided further evidence of community involvement and 
extended regional participation. As always, South Shore seeks ways to extend both 
learning and service beyond the school campus. 

Currently. 9 of the total enrollment of 592 are from Cohasset. June 2005 celebrated the 
graduation of the following student from the town: Elyse Portanova. 

The upcoming year promises to be another busy one at South Shore. The District will 
have submitted its two-year follow-up report to the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges. This compliments the recommendations made after the Fall 2003 
decennial accreditation visiting team evaluation process which was very encouraging 
overall, but as always, includes many suggestions for continued improvement. That 
together with annual recommendations made by our Advisory Committees helps to set a 
course of planning for Vo-Tech. One area that will definitely realize change is in the 
schedule of academic classes, as the addition of Science and Social Studies to the MCAS 
menu necessitates additional instructional time similar to what is currently the case with 
English and Mathematics. 

Once again. South Shore Vocational Technical High School wants to thank its member 

communities for their continued support. Successes benefit all concerned, from student 

to hometown citizenry. As a strong educational and community partner, we welcome the 

challenge to assist whenever possible in making our entire region more dynamic and 

filled with opportunity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David M. Kneeland 

Cohasset Representative 

South Shore Regional School District Committee 



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"Continuing the Commitment to Excellence" 

Cohasset Public Schools 

Annual Town Report 
2005 



It is a sincere pleasure for me to present the 2005 annual report for the Cohasset school 
department. It is a time of change in Cohasset and a time of growth. The past ten years 
have seen an increase of over three hundred and thirty six students in the district. 
Developing and implementing a plan to meet present and future needs of Cohasset' s' 
growing student population becomes more of a challenge than ever. 

The challenge is to maintain the overall strength of the school system while recognizing 
continued local and general challenges. 

We celebrate in 2005: 

The expansion of Cohasset' s' Pre School Program. 

The implementation of five full day Kindergarten classes. 

The establishment of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Cohasset 

Police Department. 

The establishment of a process for curriculum renewal, K-12, in order to 

ensure currency in the curriculum at all levels. 

The addition of the best and brightest teachers and administrators to 

enhance an already strong professional learning community; to continue to 

set and articulate high expectations for all students and staff. 

The creation of effective means of improving communication with the 

community through Connect-Ed. 

The increase in the numbers of students furthering their education beyond 

high school. 

The creation of a transparent school department budget that accurately 

reflects the needs of the district. 

While much has been accomplished in 2005, there is still much to do. New programs and 
personnel are in the planning to continue to improve student performance and move the 
district forward. We thank the community for your continued support. The time and 
efforts of the Strategic Plan Action Committees are greatly appreciated. 

The principals will follow with individual building reports from Osgood, Deer Hill and 
Cohasset Middle-High School. 

Respectfully, 

Denise M. Walsh, Ed.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 



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Joseph Osgood School Annual Town Report 

2005 

The Joseph Osgood School enjoyed a year of many changes and exciting new 
programs! The district reorganization has given us room to grow and has allowed us to 
expand early childhood programs that will greatly improve student readiness. 

We welcomed 381 children in prekindergarten to grade 2 in September 2005. This 
was an increase of 20 students from the previous school year. An additional 15 children, 
who attend the South Shore Collaborative program housed in the building, are also part 
of our school community. We continue to provide a before school program known as the 
Breakfast Club as well as an after school program for our Cohasset children. 

The Osgood School Council develops annual goals for school improvement. We 
are proud to report that excellent progress has been made in meeting those goals, thanks 
to a strong home/school partnership and community support. We are now one of more 
than 150 communities in the state that offers a full-day kindergarten program. A Full-Day 
Kindergarten Task Force worked for more than two years to plan for implementation. 
This committee completed a needs assessment based on parent survey data and in 
September 2005, 90% of our families registering for kindergarten enrolled their children 
in this new program. We are pleased that we were able to meet the needs of all families 
by providing both full-day and half-day programs. We are also pleased to report that we 
have implemented our own integrated public preschool program. This program provides 
high quality learning experiences for our children and will facilitate a smooth transition 
to kindergarten. 

An Osgood/Deer Hill Literacy Curriculum Committee met throughout the year to 
review research-based reading programs and to identify district needs. There was 
unanimous support for adopting a comprehensive K-2 program that is being implemented 
with great enthusiasm by all. The Discovering Justice program was expanded this year to 
include first and second graders. This program is a literacy-based social studies and civics 
education program that helps students become active engaged citizens while learning 
about democracy and justice. Updating curriculum is ongoing and we look forward to 
working with our new Curriculum Coordinator, Ms. Nancy Mrzyglod, who will be 
leading us through the process of curriculum review and renewal. 

Our Parent School Organization (PSO), led by Jackie Burchill and Donna 
Hayden, provided tremendous support throughout the year through curriculum 
enrichment programs, classroom grants for instructional materials, book fairs, and Family 
Math and Science Night. Parents have created a May Arts Night that is an especially 
memorable evening of outstanding events and family fun! We are grateful to all of our 
parent volunteers who participate in the day-to-day operations of the school — in the 
classroom, in the library, or at recess. We also appreciate the work of so many parents 
who contribute outside of the school day, supporting PSO fundraisers and other school 
advocacy initiatives. Our Character Education Committee continues to play an active role 
in supporting school programs and in planning programs to support parent education. 

Our facilities continue to provide space for community groups such as the Girl 
Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Cohasset Recreation Department. There were numerous summer 
programs provided at the Osgood. The district provided special education classes for 
preschool, kindergarten and grade one children. The South Shore Educational 



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Collaborative offered six programs for children from preschool to middle school. Many 
children participated in a summer sports camp that was offered. 

Early release professional development days allowed faculty and staff 
opportunities for developing curriculum that is aligned with state Frameworks and is 
integrated with content areas. Teachers are working with a reading consultant to help 
with implementation of our new program, and our staff continues to participate in 
workshops and coursework in order to maintain currency in best practices. 

We look forward to another successful school year as we work collaboratively to 
achieve our goals for school improvement. 

Janet Sheehan, 
Principal 



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2005 Town Report - Deer Hill School 

Submitted by Keith Gauley, Principal 



Deer Hill School continued implementation of the Coluisset Public Schools' 
Strategic Plan 2004-2009 and made progress towards achievement of its School 
Improvement Plan goals during the past year. As the school began its second year with 
grades three, four, and five, October 1 enrollment was 350 students. Class sizes ranged 
from 19 to 24 students in sixteen grade-level classrooms. Staff at Deer Hill School 
consisted of sixteen classroom teachers, three special education teachers, a 
speech/language pathologist, a full-time principal and secretary, and specialist teachers 
for music, art, physical education, technology, and health, hi addition, staff included a 
nurse, school psychologist, adjustment counselor, library aide, and instructional aides/ 
activity aides. Additional funding from state and federal grants provided staffing for 
occupational therapy, physical therapy and a trained behaviorist. Several staff members 
were shared with the Osgood School and with the Middle-High School. 

In 2005, the program at Deer Hill continued to include the four main content areas 
of English language arts, mathematics, science, and social science. Students also 
received instruction in art, music, technology, health and physical education. Program 
improvements this year at Deer Hill School included the second year of a computer-based 
report card system, curriculum renewal in the areas of language arts and science, and the 
introduction of the enrichment program. EMC . EMC [Enrichment. Motivation, and 
Challenge program for the 3 grade levels at Deer Hill School] includes after school 
offerings in engineering, drama, literacy (Great Books), and the development of logical 
thinking skills in a program entitled Mind Games. Extension of the EMC program 
during the school day is being planned for the 2006-2007 school year. 

Other significant events during 2005 included the increased attention on school 
security. This increased emphasis on security included the inception of staff training and 
student drills related to the district's School Safety Plan, the locking of entrances at Deer 
Hill School throughout the school day. and the use of parent volunteers as door monitors 
to check-in visitors and help ensure the safety of the students. Increased security 
measures will need to be implemented in the upcoming months and years to follow 
through with the School Safety Plan. 

The Deer Hill School Student Council became more actively involved in the 
.school and organized several events including MCAS Mania and fundraising for the 
victims of Hurricane Katrina and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The PSO 
continued its tradition of active involvement in the school by providing funding for a 
wide variety of enrichment programs, coordinating several fundraisers including the first 
Read-a-thon, arranging "room mothers" for all classrooms, planning and implementing 
the PSO Teacher Grant program, and supporting efforts to recognize staff. The Deer Hill 
School playground was also expanded as PSO funding. Student Council funding, and the 
work of many volunteers led to additional swing sets being installed for the benefit of 
students. 



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In alignment with the Education Reform Act of 1993, all Deer Hill School 
students were assessed through MCAS [Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment 
System]. Assessment areas included content standards and skills outline in the 
Department of Education curriculum framework for each area. Students at Deer Hill 
performed above the state average on MCAS in all grades. We will monitor closely and 
provide support for the subgroup of special education students who did not make 
adequate yearly progress as defined by the Department of Education. In grade three, 
2005 scores reported 85% of the students as "Proficient" in reading, in grade four, 60% 
of the students were "Advanced" or "Proficient" in English language arts and 52% were 
"Advanced" or "Proficient" in mathematics. Sixty- five percent of the grade 5 students 
scored in the proficient or advanced categories in science, technology & engineering. 
Students at Deer Hill also participated in the NAEP [National Assessment of Educational 
Progress] and these scores contributed to Massachusetts scoring first or second in the 
content areas tested in comparison to all other states at the same grade level. 

In the years ahead, we plan to make progress on our goals outlined in the Strategic 
Plan and Deer Hill's School Improvement Plan. Under the leadership of the Cohasset 
School Committee, Dr. Denise Walsh, superintendent, and Keith Gauley, principal of 
Deer Hill School, we understand that progress will need to be a collaborative effort 
involving administration, teachers and other staff members, students, parents, and the 
Cohasset community. The addition of Brian Adams as Facilities Manager will assist in 
the maintenance of our new buildings. The continual update and renewal of our 
curriculum will create relevancy and assist in the acquisition of necessary skills and 
knowledge in all content areas. Programs such as the new EMC' program, the grade five 
science fair, the grade three wax museum, and our character education program will 
further ensure that we are meeting the needs of all students and helping our students 
become productive, involved citizens in a democratic society. We will strive to achieve 
the goals that have been established and to meet the present and future needs of Cohasset 
students as we continue our commitment to excellence. 



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TOWN REPORT 

Cohasset Middle-High School 

2005 

Cohasset Middle-High School ushered in 2005 last January like many schools in the area 
by canceling school for a number of days due to snow. In spite of the snowy winter, the 
school experienced a number of accomplishments during this past school year. The 
accomplishments include academic successes for our students, high levels of 
participation and achievement in co-curricular activities, and a focus on staffing and 
professional development to better meet the needs of all students. 

All 78 members of the Class of 2005 earned competency determinations according to 
Department of Education standards, and twenty members of the class (25%) were 
recognized as John and Abigail Adams Scholarship Award recipients. Four students 
were recognized as distinguished scholars based on the highly competitive nationally 
recognized Advanced Placement test results. 

Our students continue to distinguish themselves academically. Our SAT scores remain 
highly competitive when compared to surrounding communities. The school offers credit 
in eight different Advanced Placement electives with our total student enrollment at 121. 
Results on AP exams demonstrate the preparation and success of the 57 students who 
participated in 96 exams, on which 76 (approximately 80%) were graded to be eligible 
for college credit. 

Our students distinguish themselves as they participate in a number of our extra- 
curricular activities as well, including athletics, band, chorus, drama, journalism, student 
council, and community service. Our programs continue to excel because of the 
commitment, dedication, and hard work of our students. One example of this is the 
addition of artwork on the Massachusetts Dental Associations Anti-Tobacco Calendar 
submitted by students Hannah Burgess and Meaghan Costello. 

Athletically, Cohasset High School won its first ever Division III State Championship in 
wrestling. The team also had individual State Champions Joe Kehoe, Shane Dorion, and 
Dave McKenna. Coach: Torin Sweeney was selected as District A (New England, New 
York, and New Jersey) Coach of the Year. The Girls Tennis team earned Division II 
South Sectional Semi-Finalists, with individual honors to Elizabeth Stone, South 
Sectional Finalist. The Boys Lacrosse team earned Division III State Finalist as well. 
Finally, the Athletic Program was recognized by the Boston Globe as the 2005 Division 
IV Larry Ames Award for overall excellence in athletics. This is the first time Cohasset 
has won this award. This past fall our Golf team became the South Shore League 
Champions and the Boys Soccer team made it to the Division III South Sectional Semi- 
Finals, with Aidan Buick earning Eastern Massachusetts All-Star Team recognition. 



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Finally, Tony Rolfe was recognized by the Eastern Massachusetts Football Officials 
Association as their Coach of the Year. 

Amidst these performances that have added to the fine reputation of the school and the 
community some negative activity made an impact on the day-to-day operations of the 
school and heightened our awareness regarding our goal to provide a safe, respectful 
learning environment. The collaborative efforts of the community to deal with these 
issues, will only make us stronger. 

Throughout the course of the year the school bell rang for the last time for a number of 
faculty and staff who after many years of distinguished service to the Cohasset 
community chose to retire or move on, including Maura Devin, Betty Beatson, William 
Kite, Ruth Fennessey, Jack DeLorenzo, and Fran Cronin. As a result, staffing changes 
were made throughout the summer in preparation for the new school year including a 
new principal, middle school assistant principal, middle school counselor, and eleven 
new teachers who come to us with outstanding skills and wonderful teaching methods. 
These new staff members join a faculty that numbers seventy to serve the student 
population at the Middle-High School that continues to grow. In the Middle School there 
are currently 373 students, while the High School has 412 on its roster. 

Staff members have taken on initiatives such as co-teaching, curriculum review and 
revisions, school safety, bully prevention education, and implementing an ADL Peer 
Mediation program. One member of the staff, Ms. Stephanie Wooley, was accepted by 
the Massachusetts Department of Education to assist in the development of future MCAS 
mathematics tests. As we look forward, we will explore expanding elective offerings at 
the middle and high schools, offering additional Advanced Placement courses, further 
integrating the sixth grade into the middle school structure, and focus on supporting all 
students to be proficient or advanced in all MCAS measured batteries while we continue 
the district mission to Continue the Commitment to Excellence. 



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INDEX 

In Memoriam 3-4 

Elected Officials 5-6 

Appointed Boards and Committees 7-18 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Registrars. Board of 19 

Selectmen, Board of 20-21 

Town Manager's Report 22 

Town Counsel 23-25 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 26-30 

Town Clerk's Report 3 1 

Index, Annual Town Meeting, April 2, 2005 32 

Annual Town Meeting, April 2, 2005 33-79 

Annual Town Election, April 9, 2005 80-82 

Special Town Election. May 2 1 , 2005 83-84 

Index, Special Town Meeting, December 5. 2005 85 

Special Town Meeting, December 5, 2005 86-102 

Vital Statistics 103 

Prospective Juror List 104 

FLNANCIAL REPORTS 

Town Accountant 1 05- 1 3 1 

Treasurer/Collector 132-140 

Assessors, Board of 141 

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 

Health, Board of 142-143 

Cohasset Elder Affairs 1 44- 1 55 

Cohasset Housing Authority 156-158 

LAND USE CONTROL 

Building Department 159 

Planning Board 160-162 

Conservation Commission 163 

Recycling Committee 164-166 

Alternative Energy Committee 167-170 



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